Tag Archive | Colour rings

Technopole update, Lac Rose & more

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Lots going on at Technopole at the moment, and hardly any time to write… pretty much as usual.

So here’s a quick update and a few pics, starting with some of the highlights:

  • The two obliging Buff-breasted Sandpipers are still present, seen each time in the area behind the fishermen’s cabin. The country’s 7th or 8th record, and also by far the longest staying birds.
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Buff-breasted Sandpiper / Becasseau rousset

  • This may be getting boring now and a bit of a déjà-vu, but yet again a Lesser Yellowlegs showed up in Dakar. This one was photographed on 8/2/18 by J. Dupuy and posted on observation.org; as far as I know this is the 8th record for Senegal and the third for Technopole (after singles in August 2015 and January 2016). Yesterday morning, a visit with French birders Gabriel and Etienne allowed us to relocate the bird, a very nice adult coming into breeding plumage:
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Lesser Yellowlegs / Chevalier a pattes jaunes

  • Almost just as good, and another first for Technopole (232 species on the list now), was this Common Shelduck – not totally unexpected given the small influx that took place this winter, but still a very good record and always nice to see this pretty duck showing up on my local patch. Unlike its name suggests, it’s definitely not common in Senegal, as there appear to be only about nine previous (published) records, two of which were also obtained this winter.
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Common Shelduck / Tadorne de Belon

  • Along the same lines, another scarce species showed up at Technopole recently, possibly still the same as the one I saw at the end of December: a Jack Snipe on 12 & 19/2. Only a few Garganeys are present at the moment, but Northern Shovelers are still numerous these days. At east three Eurasian Teal were with the preceding species (two males on 27/10, and a pair on 10/2).
  • Remember that influx of Short-eared Owls? Well it looks like it’s not finished yet, with the discovery of no less than seven (maybe even more!) Short-eared Owls roosting together, on 3/2, by Edgar and Jenny Ruiz (at least two birds were still in the same place on 18/2).

Switching categories now – ring reading! Even with such a diversity and sheer numbers of ducks, waders, terns, gulls to go through, we’re still paying attention to ringed birds. And making very modest contributions to our knowledge of migration strategies, survival rates, and much more – one bird at a time. Since the start of the year we’ve been able to read about 50 rings of more than 40 different birds, mostly Audouin’s, Lesser Black-backed and Slender-billed Gulls, but also a few more original species:

  • The flock of 170-180 Avocets that are still present contains at least two colour-ringed birds, both from SW Spain where they were ringed as chicks in… 2005! That’s nearly 13 years for both birds – a respectable age, though it seems that this species can live way longer that that: the record for a British (& Irish) Avocet is nearly 24 years (impressive… though not quite as much as a that 40-year old Oystercatcher!). Interestingly, “RV2” had already been seen at Technopole five years ago, by Simon, but no other sightings are known for this bird.
  • A few Black-tailed Godwits are still around though the majority has now moved on to the Iberian Peninsula from where they will continue to their breeding grounds in NW Europe. Reading rings has been difficult recently as birds tend to either feed in deeper water, or are simply too far to be read. This one below is “G2GCCP”, a first-winter bird that hatched last spring in The Netherlands and which will likely spend its first summer here in West Africa.  Note the overall pale plumage and plain underparts compared to the adult bird in the front, which has already started moulting into breeding plumage.
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Black-tailed Godwit / Barge a queue noire

  • Mediterranean Gulls are again relatively numerous this winter, with some 8-10 birds so far. As reported earlier, one bird was ringed: Green RV2L seen on 21 & 27/1, apparently the first French Med Gull to be recovered in Senegal.
  • The Caspian Tern “Yellow AV7” is probably a bird born in the Saloum delta in 2015 – awaiting details.
  • The regular Gull-billed Tern U83, ringed as a chick in 2009 in Cadiz province, seems to be pretty faithful to Technopole: after four sightings last winter, it’s again seen on most visits since the end of January.

A morning out to Lac Rose on 11/2 with visiting friends Cyril and Gottlieb was as always enjoyable, with lots of good birds around:

  • The first Temminck’s Courser of the morning was a bird flying over quite high, uttering its typical nasal trumpeting call. The next four were found a little further along, while yet another four birds were flushed almost from under the car, allowing for a few decent pictures:
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Temminck’s Courser / Courvite de Temminck

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Temminck’s Courser / Courvite de Temminck

  • The now expected Greater Short-toed Larks were not as numerous as last year, with a few dozen birds seen, sometimes side by side with Tawny Pipit. No Isabelline nor any Black-eared Wheatears this time round, but one of the Northern Wheatears was a real good fit for the leucorrhoa race from Greenland (& nearby Canada and Iceland).
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Greater Short-toed Lark / Alouette calandrelle

  • As usual, a few Singing Bush Larks were about, though not very active and as always quite difficult to get good views of as they often remain close to cover, even sheltering under bushes.
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Singing Bush Lark / Alouette chanteuse

  • Quite surprisingly, we saw lone Sand Martins (twice), a House Martin, and especially Red-rumped Swallow – the latter a long-awaited addition to my Senegal list. Already on the move, or are these hirundines overwintering in the area?
  • A final stop on the edge of the plain, where the steppe transitions into the dunes on one side and a seasonal pond (now dry) on the other. Here we found a couple of species that I’d seen in the same spot before, particularly two that have a pretty localised distribution in western Senegal it seems: Yellow-fronted Canary, and Splendid Sunbird. Also seen here were another Red-necked Falcon, Mottled Spinetail, Vieillot’s Barbet, etc.
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Splendid Sunbird / Souimanga eclatant

  • And plenty of gulls by the lake! First time I see this many gulls here, with at least 800 birds, mainly Audouin’s (ca. 350) and some 500 Lesser Black-backed Gulls. Lots of ringed birds of course, but most were too far and we didn’t take the time to go through the entire flock.

 

And elsewhere in Dakar…

  • A “Pallid HeronArdea (cinerea) monicae was found by Gottlieb and Cyril at Parc de Hann on 13/2 (but not relocated yesterday…). A rare Dakar record!
  • Seawatch sessions at Ngor continue to deliver good species, most notably good views of several European Storm-Petrels these past couple of weeks. Lots have been seen along the Petite Cote (Saly, Somone, Toubab Dialaw) recently, and especially at the Gambia river mouth where several dozen birds were counted.

 

 

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A bit of news from our little neighbour

It’s about time we reported some news from Gambia on this blog.

Clive Barlow’s recent appointment as official bird recorder for The Gambia is a great excuse to do so. Given its peculiar enclaved geography – just like my home country, a bit of an accident of history, Gambia has always had close ties to Big Brother Senegal, in many ways – cultural, religious, linguistic, ethnic, economic… In the same way, Senegal’s and Gambia’s wildlife and ecosystems are of course intricately connected. A key difference, however, is that despite it being just about 6% of the size of its neighbour, The Gambia has a much higher density of resident birders, birding tours, and local guides, and as such is far better covered, ornithologically speaking, than Senegal.

Want some examples to illustrate the connections between the two? Here’s a first one: the wanderings of Abuko, one of several Gambian “Hoodies” that are equipped with satellite tracking devices. As a youngster, this particular Hooded Vulture was a keen traveler, having covered a good deal of central Senegal, Western Casamance (where it seemingly has taken up residence), and upriver Gambia. The map below shows its movements for the past 4 years.

Abuko movements 2017-12-03

 

Another example are the Slender-billed Gulls, Caspian Terns, and Royal Terns that breed in Senegal’s Saloum delta, many of which make it to The Gambia at some point. Take for instance Slender-billed Gull “POL” ringed as a chick in June 2014 at the Ile aux Oiseaux, and seen at Tanji Bird Reserve on 16/3/15, 14/4/15 and again the following winter, on 5/2/16. Among the 40+ other recoveries of the Saloum’s breeders in TG, another one is AUF: ringed on 15/6/15 at Jakonsa (also in the PNDS), it was seen on 26/8/15 at Tanji, and then almost a year later, on 26/6/16, at our very own Technopole.

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Slender-billed Gull / Goéland railleur “POL” (John Hamilton & CrB)

 

And now for the very official announcement of Clive’s appointment, by the West African Bird Study Association from Gambia (WABSA):

“As from 15 Oct 2017 WABSA is pleased to appoint Clive R Barlow as the voluntary Country Recorder for bird observations in The Gambia. WABSA intends an annual Gambia bird report & general update of activities for presentation to DPWM & this publication will then will be accessible to all resident ornithologists & visiting birders. The work will also compliment the GIS bio diversity project currently under planning at DPWM. More news of e.g. single species enquiries, colour ring reports, nest/breeding records, will be notified as the project develops. In the meantime various report forms are being developed but feel welcome to email your ad hoc records, trip reports etc past, present & future to CliveRB [email]. Additionally, all related field research activities will involve WABSA and DPWM staff also to partake voluntarily in the absence or presence of funding. ”

So, if you visit TG: please send your records, whether of common birds or rarities, to Clive.

Clive also runs a project on the phenology of Paleartic passerine migrants to The Gambia, running from as far back as 1965 to present, systematically recording the first arrival  and last departure dates in the coastal area (Banjul – Tujering). In 2017, we have for instance the last record of Western Olivaceous Warbler in 29/03, with the first return bird as early as 28/07, while Subalpine Warbler was last seen on 26/04 and had a first returning bird on 06/10; Common Swift 14/04 & 30/07, etc. The first Common Nightingale of the autumn was heard singing on 13/11.

Watch this space for more trans-border collaborations and publications! (next up: Great Shearwater in Senegambia, status of Kelp Gull, and more!).

I certainly hope to make it to TG some time soon, to see what’s all the fuss about and visit some of the hotspots such as Tanji, Kartong, Abuko Forest, Kiang West and so on.

And meet CrB in real life 😉

 

For now, I’m off to the Djoudj, Langue de Barbarie, Lompoul and Somone. Happy holidays!

 

(Featured image: “Beach Boys” by CrB, 2017)