Archive | Cap Vert RSS for this section

Au revoir la Teranga

Our regular readers will have noticed that it’s been very quiet on this blog in recent months, so it’s about time I published an update here. There’s a simple reason for the lack of recent posts: after just over five years in Dakar, it was time to move on. Three weeks ago we landed in Laos where we will be based for the foreseeable future, marking the start of a new adventure here in Vientiane. And the end of a pretty amazing experience living in Senegal.

Moving on is of course bittersweet, as I will certainly miss the fabulous bird life that Senegal has to offer, yet at the same time I’m excited to discover the birds and culture of Laos. Even if we’re currently living in rather unsettling and unpredictable times, to say the least. Many of you will be reading this while confined at home, but being extremely busy with my work here I’ll need to keep it short… somehow writing this post is actually the one that I’ve struggled the most with so far – it’s been sitting in my drafts for about three weeks now.

Over the past five years I managed to visit all but one of the country’s regions – sadly I never made it to Matam! – and was lucky to see a good deal of its birds, 530 species to be precise, 527 of which I saw during 2015-2020. A few other numbers: some 52,500 records “collected”, four additions to the country list, about 1,040 sound recordings posted on xeno-canto, tons of poor quality bird photographs, countless happy hours in the field…

Wassadou

Wassadou Happy Hour

 

There are of course a few specials that I didn’t get to track down, such as Golden and Egyptian Nightjar, White-throated Francolin or Denham’s Bustard to name but a few, and I somehow managed to never visit Kousmar (pretty unbelievable right?) and the Niokolo-Kobo proper (I was happy enough exploring Wassadou on three occasions), but these are all good reasons to one day come back of course. That said, I’m not very optimistic about the state and future of Senegal’s environment, and while this is not the time to expand on this, there have been many frustrating, sad and upsetting moments when confronted on an almost daily basis with the ongoing destruction of natural habitats, with the ever-increasing pollution levels, and with the population’s general indifference and ignorance when it comes to nature and wildlife conservation.

BaraPiafs_Wassadou_20180617_IMG_2732

The birds of Wassadou / le bar à piafs

 

Senegal certainly has treated us well and I feel privileged to have had the chance to explore the country these past few years. I tried to promote birding in Senegal and think I made some modest contributions to the “body of ornithological knowledge” both through this blog (149 posts!) and through a number of papers, 14 to be precise, something we’ll try to continue doing in coming months (years?). The absence of recent posts on SenegalWildlife is definitely not for a lack of ideas or material… just need to find the time to write up stuff, be it here in these pages or elsewhere.

Lots of good memories, of encounters with birds of course but also of places and people, too many to start listing here. Unexpected finds, and some unexpected birding settings.

 

IMG_1036 (2).JPG

Birding the Saloum delta (yes that’s me in my pyjamas in a bath tub on the edge of a mud flat, one of those randomly surreal settings one may find oneself in… only in Senegal!) – Picture by Jane Piot

 

Despite the crazy busy few weeks leading up to our departure from Dakar, I was of course keen to go back out to some of my favourite spots: Popenguine, Technopole, Mbeubeusse, Lac Rose, and of course Le Calao for my daily dose of seawatching.

Technopole_Herons_20200210_IMG_6197.JPG

Egret feeding frenzy at Technopole, 10 February 2020

 

And as always there were some good birds to be seen here, some of which were quite unexpected. During my last visit at Technopole on the morning of our departure (8.3), a pair of Eurasian Teals was a nice find. My final ring reading here was of a French Eurasian Spoonbill ringed in the Camargue colony in 2016… with now +600 ring readings in my little database, there’s definitely enough material to write up another post on this topic. An immature Brown Booby on 21.2 and 5.3 at Ngor was pretty classic at this time of the year. Much less expected was a fine Cream-coloured Courser on the steppe near lac Rose on 20.2, apparently the first record for the Dakar region. It was loosely associating with a few Temminck’s Coursers, a classic species here, just like the handful of Greater Short-toed Larks that were present the same day. A few days earlier, a Temminck’s Stint at Mbeubeusse (16.2) was yet another scarce migrant to show up at this prime location for waders. And during our last visit to Popenguine (23.2) a Chestnut-crowned Sparrow-Weaver was a good record from this location, of a species that is rarely reported away from the south-east and that in fact I’d only seen once before in Senegal, near Kedougou.

CreamcolouredCourser_LacRose_20200220_IMG_6234

Cream-coloured Courser / Courvite isabelle, lac Rose, Feb. 2020

 

Thanks to our followers and regular readers.

Take care, stay safe, flatten that curve.

Au revoir le pays de la Teranga, à la prochaine!

 

PNLB_201904_IMG_3118

Saloum Sunset, Simal

Seawatching Ngor – August 2019

An update on this autumn’s seabird migration at Ngor is long overdue, so here we set off the season’s summary with the month of August. I managed to count migrants during 18 hours spread out over 16 sessions, starting with the first on August 9th, straight after coming back to Dakar from a short break Up North. As usual I tried to do relatively brief sessions (usually about an hour) as often as possible, typically early morning about an hour after sunrise. And always from the Club Calao terrace, of course.

Calao_20190831_IMG_4524

View from the Calao terrace, 31 August 2019

 

With some 7,100 birds counted, numbers passing through during August were about average in comparison with previous years. The few highlights so far were a Great Shearwater (Puffin majeur) flying SW on the 10th which I believe is the first August record, more than usual ‘Macaronesian’ Shearwaters (=Boyd’s or Barolo, Puffin “de Macaronésie”) with no less than 21 birds spread out fairly evenly throughout the period, and again a decent amount of Long-tailed Skuas (Labbe à longue queue). So far, 226 of these elegant pelagic skuas passed through, compared to 213 in August 2018; last year a record 500 were logged during the entire season. Top day was the 20th when I counted a very honorable 84 birds in just one hour, surprisingly during modest NNW wind – always impressive seeing loose flocks of up to 15-20 birds, usually including several adults. None were seen the following two days but during 24-26th there were 89 in 4h35′. Last year the peak passage was during the first decad of September when no less than 217 were counted in just 75′ on 2.9.18, so it’s possible that quite a few more Long-tails will pass through in coming weeks, though this will in part depend on wind conditions: moderate to strong winds from W to NW are usually required to see this species in double or even triple digits (in 2017, hardly any were seen, as shown in the chart below where the dashed line is 2017 and the dotted line 2018; solid line is hourly average per decad).

LTS_Ngor_Chart2017-18

 

Other pelagics included early Sooty Shearwaters (Puffin fuligineux) with seven birds during 24-26 August, and three Sabine’s Gulls (Mouette de Sabine) on the 20th. September and October should see many more of these two species! In contrast with last year when more than a thousand birds were seen in August when conditions were good for this species, just three Red Phalaropes (Phalarope à bec large) were detected this past month, though I had the first small flock this morning Sept. 1st, about 15 towards the SW and one coming in from the N and landing at sea. Of course many must have passed through these past few weeks, just too far off-shore for them to be seen from the coast.

Red Phalarope - DSC_2276 - B Mast

Typical view of a migrating Red Phalarope, low over the waves… Off Ngor, Oct. 2018 (Bruce Mast)

 

What was most likely the same Red-footed Booby (Fou à pieds rouges) was seen daily from 9th-12th, usually flying past at close range and sometimes feeding just behind the surf, with two birds together on Aug. 17th. I also twice saw one in July so it’s quite possible that at least one of these two immatures – both dark morph, as all others seen so far – oversummered around the peninsula.

As usual, the most frequently seen wader was Whimbrel, with just a handful of Oystercatchers and Bar-tailed Godwits each (Courlis corlieu, Huîtrier pie, Barge rousse). The lower number of waders compared to the past few years is probably due to the late arrival of the rains and a four-day gap in my presence during the last week of the month (waders tend to be seen mostly during and just after spells of rain here).

Whimbrel_Ngor_20170930_IMG_4932

Whimbrel / Courlis corlieu, Ngor, Oct. 2017 (BP)

 

The table below lists all species with totals for the month, with 2017 and 2018 numbers to compare with. Note that the vast majority of the ‘Comic’ Terns were Arctic, and the higher number of Roseate Terns is possibly explained by the fact that I may feel more confident identifying these birds (Sterne arctique/pierregarin, Sterne de Dougall). Oftentimes, Roseates are migrating 2-3 birds together, usually mixed in with Arctic Terns.

 

Species

2019

2018

2017

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel 0 157 0
Cape Verde Shearwater 0 100 1
Great Shearwater 1 0 0
Sooty Shearwater 7 0 0
Boyd’s/Barolo Shearwater 21 3 0
Shearwater sp. 3 6 4
Red-footed Booby 2 0 0
Oystercatcher 8 8 6
Whimbrel 127 340 437
Bar-tailed Godwit 6 1 49
Turnstone 0 4 13
Red Knot 0 28 0
Ruff 0 1 5
Sanderling 0 0 16
Curlew Sandpiper 0 0 4
Little Stint 0 0 4
Grey (Red) Phalarope 3 1,123 0
Common Sandpiper 0 7 1
Common Redshank 1 1 1
Audouin’s Gull 7 0 0
Lesser Black-backed Gull 0 0 1
Yellow-legged Gull 0 1 0
Large gull sp. (prob. Kelp Gull) 1 0 2
Slender-billed Gull 1 0 1
Sabine’s Gull 3 12 6
Arctic/Common Tern 3,878 4,500 1,399
Roseate Tern 56 44 10
Little Tern 23 56 28
Sandwich Tern 462 343 463
Lesser Crested Tern 4 40 41
African Royal Tern 342 585 166
Caspian Tern 10 14 1
White-winged Tern 0 1 0
Black Tern 1,803 2,160 774
Bridled Tern 0 4 0
Catharacta Skua sp. 0 0 1
Pomarine Skua 3 1 2
Arctic Skua 59 94 24
Long-tailed Skua 226 213 25
Skua sp. 46 18 17
Total birds 7,103 9,865 3,502
Number of days 16 22 13
Number of hours 18h05′ 26h20′ 17h05′

 

Meanwhile at Technopole, the lagoons are finally starting to fill up again now that we’ve had a few decent showers, though a lot more will be needed to ensure that the site remains wet all through the dry season. There’s a good diversity of waders again and breeding activity is at its peak for many of the local species. Striated Heron for instance is now very visible, and last Sunday I saw a pair feeding a recently fledged young at the base of one of the Avicennia stands on the main lagoon, while Spur-winged Lapwing juveniles are all about, Zitting Cisticolas are busy tending their nest, and this morning a small flock of juvenile Bronze Mannikins was seen (Héron strié, Vanneau éperonné, Cisticole des joncs, Capucin nonnette).

Several wader species are starting to pass through again, such as Common Ringed Plover, Little Stint, Curlew Sandpiper and Marsh Sandpiper (Grand Gravelot, Bécasseau minute, Bécasseau cocorli, Chevalier stagnatile). It’s also peak season for Ruff, with a very modest max. so far of 148 counted this morning (Combattant varié).

On the gulls & terns front, a Mediterranean Gull was still around on 18 & 25.8, probably one of the two immatures that were seen in May-July and apparently completing its summer stay here (these are the first summer records for the species in Senegal), while the first juvenile Audouin’s Gulls of the year were also seen last Sunday, Aug. 25th (Mouette mélanocéphale, Goéland d’Audouin, . This morning a White-winged Tern was of note, as were 24 Little Terns resting with the other terns or feeding above the main lake (Guifette leucoptère, Sterne naine). Three Orange-breasted Waxbills and three Long-tailed Nightjars on 11.08 were far less expected (Bengali zebré, Engoulevent à longue queue).

This morning’s eBird checklist has all the details.

 

CommonRedshank-Ruff_Technopole_20190901_IMG_4541

Redshank & Ruff / Chevalier gambette & Combattant

CurlewSandpiper_Technopole_20190901_IMG_4560

Curlew Sandpiper / Bécasseau cocorli juv.

 

 

 

Petite revue de la bibliographie ornithologique sénégalaise, 2016-2019 (Troisième partie)

Cette troisième et dernière partie de notre petite série sur la littérature ornithologique sénégalaise concerne la documentation des divers ajouts à l’avifaune du pays. Les publications qui suivent décrivent donc les « premières » pour le pays, par ordre chronologique de publication.

Ces articles ont été publiés dans l’un ou l’autre des deux revues de prédilection pour ce type de notes, soit le Bulletin de l’African Bird Club et Malimbus de la Socété d’ornithologie de l’Ouest africain (à laquelle, en passant, chaque ornitho qui s’interésse à l’avifaune du Sénégal ou de manière plus large de l’Afrique de l’Ouest devrait adhérer!).

20190814_193312-1

 

Pour une liste complète des nouvelles espèces de ces douze dernières années, voir ce billet; voir aussi les parties I et II de notre revue bibliographique.

 

  • Première mention du Merle obscur pour le Sénégal: Benjumea & Pérez 2016. First record of Eyebrowed Thrush Turdus obscurus for Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Bull. ABC 23: 215-216.

Découverte fortuite incroyable, le 10/12/15 dans un jardin d’hôtel, par deux ornithos espagnols en marge d’une de leurs missions d’étude dans le PN de la Langue de Barbarie. Il s’agit de la deuxième mention de cette espèce sibérienne sur le continent africain, alors qu’elle hiverne normalement en Asie du sud-est, la première provenant de Merzouga au Maroc en décembre 2008. Comme quoi presque n’importe quel migrateur à longue distance d’origine paléarctique peut se retrouver égaré dans nos contrées… et comme quoi, ça sert de toujours avoir un appareil photo à portée de main!

 

  • Delannoy 2016. Les premières observations de l’Alouette à queue rousse Pinarocorys erythropygia au Sénégal. Malimbus 38: 80-82.

La première observation documentée de cette alouette peu connue a été faite dans le Boundou du 10 au 12 novembre 2015, suivant deux observations antérieures non encore publiées formellement, toutes deux du Niokolo-Koba: la première en février 1985, la deuxième en novembre 1992.

C’est donc une alouette à rechercher en hiver dans le sud-est du pays, mais son apparition est probablement très aléatoire, étant une espèce à caractère erratique qui se trouve ici tout à fait en limite de son aire “hivernale” régulière. Elle fréquente les savanes arborées ouvertes tout comme des zones cultivées, affectionnant particulièrement des zones récemment brûlées.

 

  • Première observation de la Bergeronnette à longue queue au Sénégal: Pacheco, Ruiz de Azua & Fernández-García 2017. First record of Mountain Wagtail Motacilla clara for Senegal. Bull. ABC 24: 88-89.

Cette mention de Dindéfélo en mars 2015 reste pour le moment la seule pour le pays, bien qu’il soit possible que cette bergeronnette soit un visiteur non-nicheur plus ou moins régulier dans l’extrême sud-est du pays, dans les contreforts du Fouta-Djallon. A rechercher aux abords du fleuve Gambie et des ruisseaux de vallons autour de Kédougou.

 

  • Observations remarquables du Sénégal, dont la première de l’Engoulevent pointillé: Blanc et al. 2018. Noteworthy records from Senegal, including the first Freckled Nightjar Caprimulgus tristigma. Bull. ABC 25: 58-61.

En plus de la description des observations de l’engoulevent, espèce maintenant considérée comme résidente à Dindéfélo et sans doute dans des milieux similaires dans les environs, les auteurs rapportent des données nouvelles concernant l’Engoulevent doré (dans le Khelkom), à Dindéfélo le Drongo occidental (encore le Drongo de Ludwig à l’époque, auparavant connu uniquement de la Casamance), le Traquet de Heuglin (nicheur sur le plateau de Dande) ainsi que le très discret Sénégali à ventre noir, et enfin le Bihoreau à dos blanc et le Martin-pêcheur azuré au bord du fleuve Gambie à Mako. Ces deux derniers sont depuis plusieurs années assez régulièrement observés dans cette région, notamment autour de Wassadou.

Avec l’espèce précédente, le Trogon narina et deux indicateurs différents, Dindefelo détient clairement la palme en tant que hotspot pour la découverte de nouvelles espèces pour le pays.

 

  • Première donnée du Fou à pieds rouges au Sénégal: Moran et al. First record of Red-footed Booby Sula sula for Senegal. Bull. ABC 25: 213-215.

Le 19/10/16, un Fou à pieds rouges immature a été photographié à environ 10 milles marins au nord de Dakar, lors d’une sortie en mer en marge du PAOC, observation que nous avions déjà rapportée ici. Depuis, pas moins de quatre mentions supplémentaires sont connues, toutes autour de la presqu’île du Cap-Vert: un oiseau en janvier 2018 au PNIM, puis trois fois à Ngor en 2018-2019 dont quelques oiseaux ayant stationné pendant plusieurs semaines ou même mois (deux ind. en mai-juin 2018, un en novembre 2018, et un vu régulièrement en juin-août 2019 dont encore ce 12/8 comme les quatres jours précédents!).

Avec l’augmentation des effectifs aux Iles du Cap Vert on peut s’attendre à d’autres observations dans le futur.

RedfootedBooby_Dakar_20161016_BarendvanGemerden - 2

Red-footed Booby / Fou à pieds rouges, au large de Dakar, Oct. 2016 (B. van Gemerden)

 

  • Première observation d’une Frégate superbe pour le Sénégal: Piot & Lecoq 2018. First record of Magnificent Frigatebird Fregata magnificens for Senegal. Bull. ABC 25: 216-218.

Notre observation de fin avril 2017 reste pour le moment la seule confirmée pour le pays. Bien qu’il puisse s’agir d’une des deux dernières femelles des Îles du Cap-Vert (où l’espèce ne niche plus depuis 1999), une origine néotropicale semble plus probable. Le site de reproduction le plus proche de l’Afrique de l’Ouest est l’île de Fernando de Noronha, situé au nord-est du Brésil à environ 2’650 km de Dakar. D’autres données de frégates dans la sous-région concernent des observations en Gambie (Frégates superbes en 1965 et 1980, puis une frégate sp. en 2005) et au Ghana (Frégate aigle-de-mer F. aquila en 2010, espèce aussi notée aux iles du Cap-Vert en 2017 et donc également d’apparition possible dans les eaux sénégalaises). A quand la prochaine mention dans le pays?

MagnificentFrigatebird_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170429_IMG_1811

Magnificent Frigatebird / Frégate superbe f., PNIM, April 2016 (BP)

 

  • Première donnée du Pipit farlouse au Sénégal: Piot 2018. First record of Meadow Pipit Anthus pratensis for Senegal. Malimbus 40: 67-69.

Le 1er janvier 2018, j’ai la chance de trouver un Pipit farlouse aux abords de la lagune de Yène sur la Petite Côte non loin de Dakar. Bien que l’identification ait été confirmée par les cris caractéristiques de l’espèce, plusieurs personnes semblent toujours douter de l’identité de cet oiseau, me disant qu’il s’agit plutôt d’un Pipit à gorge rousse… Le plumage assez contrasté de cet oiseau de permier hiver peut effectivement faire penser à cette espèce, mais d’autres critères et notamment l’absence de stries sur le croupion (visibles sur photo, comme celle-ci) permettent d’éliminer le Pipit à gorge rousse, tout comme le cri d’ailleurs qui est très différent. L’espèce étant connue du sud de la Mauritanie, l’apparition d’un Pipit farlouse égaré au Sénégal n’est pas bien étonnante.

MeadowPipit_Yene_20180101_IMG_7862 (2)

Meadow Pipit / Pipit farlouse, Yene, Jan. 2018 (BP)

 

En plus de ces sept publications, plusieurs autres sont sous presse ou sont sur le point d’être soumis et seront publiés dans les mois à venir : l’Indicateur de Wahlberg vu plusieurs fois en 2018 (Caucanas et al.), le Gonolek de Turati en 2018 (Bargain & Piot) et l’Anomalospize parasite en février 2019 (Bargain, Caucal & de Montaudouin) tous les deux découverts en Casamance, et enfin la Tourterelle turque en 2016 (BP).

Il y a aussi quelques premières obs encore non encore publiées formellement, notamment nos Martinets horus (rédaction prévue!) de l’an dernier et l’Indicateur de Willcocks de février dernier. Tout comme des mentions un peu moins récentes d’oiseaux qui pour le moment ont été observés une seule fois dans le pays (Epervier d’Europe, Milan royal, Grue cendréeBécasseau d’Alaska) mais dont je doute qu’une publication verra un jour le jour, bien malheureusement…

Quoiqu’il en soit, je vous tiens bien entendu au courant de la suite!

 

Je me permets de terminer en faisant un peu de pub pour une autre publication sur les oiseaux du Sénégal, dans un tout autre registre de celles qui précèdent mais toute aussi intéressante : un recit de voyage naturaliste sous forme de magazine auto-édité par mes amis Frédéric et Jérémy. Truffée de superbes photos, des textes riches en informations pertinentes et anecdotes diverses, c’est bien plus qu’un simple rapport de voyage, où chacun trouvera quelque chose à son goût. De Dakar au Djoudj en passant par les Trois-Marigots, le Gandiolais, et bien d’autres encore!

A decouvrir (et à commander) ici

20190816_180340-1

 

 

Petite revue de la bibliographie ornithologique sénégalaise, 2016-2019 (Deuxième partie)

Si les publications passées en revue dans la première partie étaient en grande partie issues d’études scientifiques menées par des chercheurs académiques, les articles présentés ici sont pour la plupart rédigés par des ornithologues de terrain et de passionnés d’oiseaux fréquentant régulièrement le pays ou qui, comme moi, ont la chance d’y résider et de pouvoir apporter des contributions, certes modestes, à nos connaissances de l’avifaune. Finalement il y aura encore une troisième partie, sinon cet article serait un peu trop long et risquerait de devenir un peu trop ennuyeux!

On s’intéresse ici donc essentiellement au statut et à la répartition des oiseaux du Sénégal, avec dans l’ordre taxonomique les publications suivantes, toujours pour la période 2016-2019:

  • Mortalité massive de Puffins majeurs le long de la côte de la Gambie en juin 2011, et observations récentes au Sénégal: Barlow, Piot & Fox 2018. Great Shearwater Ardenna gravis mass mortality in The Gambia in June 2011, recent observations from Senegal, and evidence for migration patterns. Malimbus 40: 10-20.

Au moins 103 Puffins majeurs sont trouvés rejetés sur 7 km de plages en Gambie en juin 2011, constituant les premières données de l’espèce pour ce pays. Les mesures biométriques à partir de 18 crânes sont présentées et nous résumons les observations publiées pour le Sénégal, la Mauritanie et les îles du Cap-Vert, tout en rapportant de nouvelles informations pour le Sénégal (issues de mes suivis de la migration devant Ngor!). Les mouvements de Puffins majeurs suivis par satellite depuis les sites de reproduction de l’Hémisphère Sud vers l’Atlantique Nord ainsi que leurs stratégies de nourrissage au cours de leur migration sont discutés. La faim est proposée comme cause probable de la mort des oiseaux échoués.

Nous avons également pu contribuer des données récentes obtenues à Ngor à deux autres articles récents traitant d’observations d’oiseaux de mer en Gambie, rédigés par nos collègues gambiens Clive Barlow et Geoff Dobbs :

  • Barlow 2017. First proof of Sooty Shearwater Puffinus griseus in The Gambia, May 2012. Malimbus 39: 56-58 [Première preuve pour le Puffin fuligineux en Gambie, en mai 2012]
  • Barlow & Dobbs 2019. New observations of five species of pelagic seabirds in The Gambia in early 2018, with information from previous years. Malimbus 41: 32-40 [Nouvelles observations de cinq espèces d’oiseaux de mer en janvier-février 2018 en Gambie].
GreatShearwater_Pelagic_20171115_IMG_5887

Great Shearwater / Puffin majeur, Ngor, Nov. 2017 (BP)

 

  • Le Grèbe castagneux, aujourd’hui une espèce reproductrice résidente en Gambie, avec une aire de reproduction au Sénégal étendue: Barlow, Piot & Bargain 2018. Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis now a breeding resident in The Gambia, with an expanded breeding range in Senegal. Malimbus 40: 47-54.

Nous rapportons ici l’historique du Grèbe castagneux en Gambie et au Sénégal, en fournissant des données nouvelles sur la reproduction et de nouveaux sites de nidification depuis 2001. L’utilisation de plans d’eau artificiels en tant que sites de nidification contribue à l’extension de la saison de reproduction ainsi que de l’aire de répartition dans cette région.

LittleGrebe_map_v4_labels_noOSM

Sites de nidification du Grèbe castagneux au Sénégal et en Gambie

 

  • Taille de la population et phénologie de reproduction du Phaéton à bec rouge aux Iles de la Madeleine: Diop et al. 2019. Population Size and Breeding Phenology of Red-Billed Tropicbirds (Phaethon aethereus) on Iles de la Madeleine, Senegal. Waterbirds 42: 100-106.

La phénologie de reproduction et la répartition dans les sites de nidification des phaétons ont fait l’objet d’un suivi du 6 juin 2014 au 18 mai 2016 dans le PN des Îles de la Madeleine, avec des visites tous les 15 jours pour enregistrer les nids actifs et leur contenu. Ngoné et ses collegues trouvé jusqu’à 76 sites de nidification mais seulement 49 étaient actifs en 2014-2015 et 45 en 2015-2016. Les phaétons se reproduisent tout au long de l’année, mais le nombre de nids actifs a culminé d’octobre à janvier, ce qui peut être lié au caractère saisonnier de l’upwelling océanique. Les nids ont été regroupés dans quatre zones et leur répartition et leur occupation peuvent être liées à la direction du vent pendant le pic de reproduction saisonnier d’octobre à mai. Le succès de reproduction était généralement élevé (62,9% en 2014-2015 et 47,3% en 2015-2016) par rapport aux autres colonies se reproduisant dans des eaux moins productives. Étant donné la singularité et la petite taille de cette population, une surveillance, une gestion et une protection stricte sont nécessaires pour garantir sa viabilité.

  • Effectif exceptionnel de Vautours percnoptères observé au Sénégal en novembre 2017, avec historique et actualisation de son statut au Sénégal et en Gambie: Caucanas, Piot, Barlow & Phipps 2018. A major count of the Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus in Senegal in November 2017, with notes on its history and current status in Senegal and The Gambia. Malimbus 40: 55-66.

Nous rapportons l’observation d’un groupe de 30 Percnoptères d’Egypte le 26/11/17 dans la RNC du Boundou, soit le groupe le plus important jamais documenté au Sénégal et en Gambie et l’un des plus importants pour le Sahel. En déclin rapide dans la plus grande partie de son aire de répartition, nous dressons un état des lieux des observations et données obtenues par suivi GPS depuis la première mention en 1913, et nous proposons qu’elle soit considérée comme migratrice peu fréquente ne nichant pas dans ces deux pays, étant régulière seulement dans l’extrême est du Sénégal.

  • Déclin d’une population urbaine de Vautours charognards sur 50 ans à Dakar: Mullié et al. 2017. The decline of an urban Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus population in Dakar, Senegal, over 50 years. Ostrich 88: 131-138.

A Dakar, comme dans de nombreux centres urbains de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, les Vautours charognards ont toujours été des charognards urbains caractéristiques. Le récent déclin dans d’autres parties de l’Afrique a motivé, en 2015, son inscription sur la Liste rouge de l’UICN comme espèce menacée « En danger critique d’extinction ». Comme nous l’avons déjà rapporté, nous avons mené une enquête sur son statut actuel à Dakar afin d’effectuer une comparaison avec les données disponibles depuis un demi-siècle. Une forte baisse (>85%) a été notée, la population estimée passant de 3’000 individus en 1969 à seulement 400 en 2016. Ce déclin correspond aux chutes constatées ailleurs en Afrique mais contraste avec les populations apparemment stables de la Gambie à la Guinée. Les causes probables sont 1) une urbanisation galopante entraînant une perte de sites d’alimentation et une réduction de la disponibilité de nourriture, 2) un empoisonnement accru de chiens sauvages due à une recrudescence de la rage et 3) une disparition accrue des arbres appropriés pour la nidification et le repos.

HoodedVulture_Technopole_20190610_IMG_4209

Hooded Vulture / Vautour charognard, Technopole, June 2019 (BP)

 

  • Voies de migration de la population méditerranéenne de la Sterne voyageuse: Hamza et al. 2017. Migration flyway of the Mediterranean breeding Lesser Crested Tern Thalasseus bengalensis emigrates. Ostrich 88: 53-58.

Un programme de baguage a été mis en place de 2006 à 2012 dans les colonies de Libye, soit les seules sites en Méditerrannée. A partir d’un total de 1354 couvées baguées à l’aide de bagues métalliques et/ou couleurs, 64 ont été retrouvées le long de leur voie migratoire ou sur leur aire d’hivernage.

Cependant, les auteurs écrivent que « le Sénégal et la Gambie sont au cœur de l’aire d’hivernage, » affirmation erronée rectifiée par Dowsett & Isenmann 2018 (Wintering area of the Libyan breeding population of Lesser Crested Tern. Alauda 86: 65-68) qui démontrent que la principale zone d’hivernage se trouve en Guinée-Bissau et en Sierra Leone. Bien que quelques dizaines à quelques centaines d’oiseaux hivernent bel et bien en Sénégambie, l’essentiel des nicheurs libyens hiverne donc un peu plus au sud. Cela n’enleve cependant en rien la conclusion de Hamza et collègues, comme quoi « la conservation de cette population particulièrement localisée et menacée ne réclame pas seulement une protection des sites de reproduction mais également celle des escales migratoires et des sanctuaires d’hivernage»

Lesser Crested Tern / Sterne voyageuse

Lesser Crested Tern / Sterne voyageuse portant une bague posée en Libye, Ngor, May 2013 (P. Robinson)

 

  • Un afflux de Hiboux des marais en Afrique de l’Ouest pendant l’hiver 2017/18: Piot 2019. An influx of Short-eared Owls Asio flammeus in West Africa in winter 2017/18.  Bull. ABC 26: 206-212 [publication prévue dans le prochain numéro, en septembre].

Pendant l’automne 2017 et l’hiver 2017/18, un afflux sans précédent a eu lieu en Afrique de l’Ouest et particulièrement au Sénégal ; des observations ont également été réalisées en Gambie, en Guinée-Bissau et en Mauritanie. Entre début novembre 2017 et mi-avril 2018, 22 observations concernant au moins 24 oiseaux ont été rapportées: ceux-ci ont peut-être hiverné plus au sud que d’habitude en raison des rudes conditions hivernales en Europe de l’Ouest. Les effectifs fluctuent probablement aussi en fonction des densités d’acridiens au Sahel, où une part importante du régime alimentaire peut être constituée d’insectes. L’espèce devrait y être considérée comme un migrateur régulier et un hivernant localement peu commun en petit nombre, avec des variations interannuelles importantes. La rareté des observations dans la région est probablement due aux habitudes crépusculaires et nocturnes de l’espèce, et aussi à une présence très limitée d’observateurs.

ShortearedOwl_Technopole_20171231_IMG_7729

Short-eared Owl / Hibou des marais, Technopole, Dec. 2017 (BP)

 

  • L’étude par géolocalisateurs révèle que le Martinet unicolore des Canaries hiverne en Afrique de l’Ouest équatoriale: Norton et al. Geolocator study reveals that Canarian Plain Swifts Apus unicolor winter in equatorial West Africa. Publié sur le site de l’African Bird Club (je suppose qu’un article formel suivra; cliquez le lien pour obtenir le PDF).

Même s’il ne s’agit pas d’une étude sénégalaise, elle a toute son importance pour nous: en effet, le suivi par géolocalisateurs a montré que le Martinet unicolore hiverne dans la zone forestière de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, et que l’espèce fait partie de l’avifaune du Sénégal. C’était sans doute l’une des grandes découvertes de ces dernières années – tout comme nos Martinets horus, dont un article portant sur notre étonnante trouvaille de janvier 2018 est en cours de préparation.

En juillet 2013, 16 Martinets unicolores, espèce endémique des Canaries qu’on pensait lagement sedentaire (ailleurs, vu seulement dans les régions cotières du nord-ouest de l’Afrique), ont été équipés de géolocalisateurs dans deux colonies de reproduction sur Tenerife. (Un géolocalisateur, minuscule appareil électronique pesant moins d’un gramme, mesure l’intensité du rayonnement solaire et l’heure, et enregistre ces données pendant une année; au retour de l’oiseau, celles-ci permettent de reconstituer son itinéraire). Parmi ces 16 individus, deux ont par la suite été retrouvés dans la colonie. Les deux oiseaux ont passé la majeure partie de l’hiver dans les forêts de l’est du Libéria. Ils ont quitté la colonie en octobre et novembre respectivement, et ont parcouru au moins 2’600 km pour hiverner, passant toute la période d’hivernage jusqu’en mars-avril 2014 dans les forêts de la Haute-Guinée au Libéria, en Guinée et en Côte d’Ivoire. La route migratoire prénuptiale comprenait le passage dans plusieurs pays où l’espèce n’avait là non plus jamais encore été signalée, dont le Sénégal, la Gambie, la Guinée-Bissau et la Sierra Leone. L’étude souligne l’importance de l’écosystème forestier de la Haute-Guinée pour au moins certains Martinets unicolores, les oiseaux passant plus de la moitié de l’année dans ce hotspot de biodiversité. Elle montre également qu’il devrait donc être possible d’observer cette espèce in natura au Sénégal, notamment en automne et au printemps, même si l’identification sera forcément délicate.

  • La Fauvette de Moltoni au Sénégal et en Afrique de l’Ouest: Piot & Blanc 2017. Moltoni’s Warbler Sylvia subalpina in Senegal and West Africa. Malimbus 39: 37-43.

Récemment élevée au rang d’espèce après la révision taxonomique du complexe des Fauvettes passerinettes, l’aire d’hivernage de la Fauvette de Moltoni était en grande partie inconnue. A la suite d’observations récentes au Sénégal, où sa présence a été enregistrée annuellement depuis 2013, nous avons passé en revue les observations faites en Afrique de l’Ouest : celles-ci suggèrent que l’espèce est largement répartie dans le Sahel, du Sénégal au Nigéria. Il semble que l’espèce soit plus abondante à l’est de cette zone, cependant l’aire de répartition précise et son abondance nécessitent plus de recherches, tout comme ses stratégies de mue et de migration.

  • Rose et al. 2016. Observations ornithologiques au Sénégal. Malimbus 38: 15-22.

Cinq observations d’espèces rares ou peu communes sont décrites, toutes de janvier 2015, dont on peut cependant se poser la question si une publication était réellement nécessaire, car leur simple inclusion dans la rubrique des observations récentes de l’ABC aurait sans doute suffi. Quoiqu’il en soit, les auteurs relatent les observations d’un Onoré à huppe blanche dans le delta du Saloum (où l’espèce est maintenant assez régulièrement vue, à Toubacouta), d’un Hibou des marais aux Îles de la Madeleine, d’un Engoulevent du désert au Djoudj, d’un Martin-pêcheur azuré au Niokolo-Koba, et d’un Sirli du désert dans le Ndiael. La prédation d’un Héron garde-bœufs par un Aigle martial, ainsi que l’histoire de vie d’une Barge à queue noire baguée, sont également rapportées.

Black-tailed Godwits / Barges a queue noire

Dutch and English colour-rigned Black-tailed Godwits / Barges à queue noire baguées aux Pays-Bas et en Angleterre, Technopole Jan. 2016 (BP)

 

Deux autres notes courtes sont également à mentionner ici, la première traitant de notre observation d’une pie-grièche hybride du lac Tanma en 2017 (Piot & Caucanas 2019. A hybrid shrike Lanius in Senegal; publication prévue dans le prochain bulletin de l’ABC), l’autre d’une observation de plusieurs Travailleurs à bec rouge à env. 100 km au large de la côte sénégalaise, soit la donnée la plus éloignée du continent jusqu’à présent (Quantrill, R. 2017. Red-billed Queleas Quelea quelea at sea off Senegal. Bull. ABC 24: 216).

Puis au moins deux articles supplémentaires traitant du statut et de la distribution d’oiseaux au Sénégal sont prévues pour publication ces prochains mois, dans la revue Alauda : le premier sur les quartiers d’hiver et les voies de migration du Pouillot ibérique (Isenmann & Piot), le second sur les résultats de nos suivis 2017 et 2018 de la migration des oiseaux de mer à Ngor (première partie prévue en décembre, 2e partie en début d’année prochaine).

La troisième et dernière partie de notre petite série sur la literature ornithologique sénégalaise concernera la documentation des divers ajouts à l’avifaune du pays.

 

 

The Great Re-Tern

April is Tern month!

From mid-March into May, lots of terns pass through Dakar on their way back home from the wintering grounds further south – some as far as South Africa! – and the first half of April is definitely peak time for many species. When conditions are right, literally thousands of these elegant birds may pass through on a single day, and sites such as Technopole can hold several hundreds of birds at any one time. So much that in the past week, I’ve had the chance to see 12 out of the 14 tern species that are known to occur in Senegal, the only ones missing being Bridled and the rare Sooty Tern.

On Monday 8.4 at Technopole, decent numbers of terns were about, mainly Sandwich Tern (+300, likely quite a bit more) with a supporting cast of the usual Caspian and Gull-billed Terns (the former with several recently emancipated juveniles, likely from the Saloum or Casamance colonies), but also several dozen African Royal Tern, a few Common Terns, at least two Lesser Crested, and as a bonus two fine adult Roseate Terns roosting among their cousins. And as I scanned one of the flocks one last time before returning back home, an adult Whiskered Tern in breeding plumage, already spotted the previous day by Miguel. I managed to read four ringed Sandwich Terns but far more were wearing rings, but were impossible to read.

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2765.JPG

Gulls & Terns at Technopole

 

Yesterday 13.4, we went back to our favourite urban hotspot mainly in order to see if we could read some more of these rings. The main roost is close to the northern shore of the main lagoon, quite close to golf club house, which makes it possible to get close enough to the birds to read most rings. We saw most of the same tern species (except Roseate), with the addition of a fine moulting White-winged Tern and a small flock of Little Terns migrating over our heads. The first colour-ringed bird we saw was actually a Gull-billed Tern, but not the usual Spanish bird (“U83”) ringed in 2009 and seen several times herein the past three winters. This bird was even more interesting, as it was ringed in the only remaining colony in northern Europe, more precisely in the German Wadden Sea. Awaiting details from the ringers, but it’s quite likely that there are very few (if any!) recoveries of these northern birds this far south. It may well be the same bird as one that we saw back in November 2018 at lac Mbeubeusse, though we didn’t manage to properly establish the ring combination at the time.

GullbilledTern_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2751

Colour-ringed Gull-billed Tern & Black-winged Stilts / Sterne hansel & Echasse blanche

 

So, back to our ring readings: all in all, we managed to decipher an impressive 14 Sandwich Tern rings – blue, white, yellow & red! – of birds originating from no less than four countries: Ireland, UK, Netherlands, and one from Italy (to be confirmed). Most of these are chicks that were born in summer 2016 and that logically spent their first two years in the Southern Hemisphere, and are now returning back to their breeding grounds for the first time. In addition, a Black-headed Gull with a blue ring proved to be a French bird ringed as a chick in a colony in the Forez region (west of Lyon) in 2018, while a Spanish Audouin’s Gull was a bird not previously read here. I’ll try to find some time to write up more on our ring recoveries, now that my little database has just over 500 entries!

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2778

More gulls & terns

 

Others local highlights from these past few days are the Lesser Yellowlegs still at Technopole on 8.4 (but not seen yesterday… maybe it has finally moved on), also a superb breeding plumaged Bar-tailed Godwit, still a few Avocets, plenty of Ruff, Little Stint, Sanderling, Curlew Sandpiper and Dunlin, many of which in full breeding attire. And on 13.4, once again a Franklin’s Gull, but also a rather late Mediterranean Gull and what was probably the regular adult Yellow-legged Gull seen several times since December. Three Spotted Redshanks were also noteworthy as this is not a regular species at Technopole. The Black-winged Stilts are breeding again, and the first two chicks – just a couple of days old – were seen yesterday, with at least two more birds on nests; a family of Moorhen was also a good breeding record.

Full eBird checklist from 13.4 here.

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2786

A sleepy Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin

 

Earlier this week at the Calao was just about as good in terms of tern diversity: again the usual Sandwich Terns which are passing through en masse at the moment, with some LCT’s in the mix, several dozen Common Terns and the odd Roseate Tern hurriedly yet graciously flying past the seawatch spot, and of course more Royal Terns en route to Langue de Barbarie or Mauritanian breeding sites, a lone Caspian Tern, and this time round an even less expected White-winged Tern (and just two Black Terns). Oh and also the first Arctic Tern of the season! The first birds in spring are typically seen at the end of March or first half of April; earliest dates (2015-2018) are 16.3.18 and 25.3.16. The numbers of migrating terns were really impressive here on Saturday 6.4: a rough estimate puts the number of Sandwich and Common Terns passing through at 500 and 1200, respectively, in just two hours.

At Ngor, regular morning sessions have yielded the usual Pomarine and Arctic Skuas, Northern Gannets, as well as a handful of Cape Verde Shearwaters feeding offshore on most days. Sooty Shearwaters passed through in good numbers on 6.4, while last Friday (12.4) was best for Sabine’s Gull: 73 birds in just one hour, so far my best spring count. Also several Long-tailed Skuas and the other day a South Polar or (more likely) a Great Skua was present, a rare spring sighting. All checklists for the recent Calao counts can be found on this eBird page.

 

CommonGreenshank_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2752

Greenshank & Black-winged Stilt / Chevalier aboyeur & Echasse blanche

 

 

Pelagic trip off Ngor

Why would two Portuguese, a Mauritanian, a Cape-Verdian, a French, an American and a Belgian set off on a boat trip one morning in October? Seabirds of course! With Gabriel in town, Bruce over from the US, Miguel and Antonio as motivated as ever to get out of the office and to have some of their BirdLife colleagues strengthen their seabird id skills, it was time to organise our now annual autumn pelagic, on October 1st.

Conditions were perfect to get out on our small boat (organised through Nautilus Diving: merci Hilda!) though probably a bit too calm for active seabird migration. We chose to head straight west to the edge of the continental shelf, rather than try the “trawler area” off Kayar as this is quite a bit more distant from Ngor. Needless to say that expectations were high as is always the case during these rare opportunities to get close views of the treasured tubenoses – storm petrels, shearwaters – skuas and maybe some Grey Phalaropes or Sabine’s Gulls.

NgorPlage_20181002_IMG_3333

Ngor plage

 

A Manx Shearwater zooming past the boat was one of the first pelagic species we got to see, followed by quite a few Sooty Shearwaters (Puffin fuligineux).

SootyShearwater_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3289

Sooty Shearwater / Puffin fuligineux (BP)

 

Further out, Wilson’s Storm Petrel became the dominant species, with a few dozen birds seen – and probably many more that went undetected – particularly around the upwelling area. Almost all were obviously actively migrating, and we managed to get some good views of several of them as they zoomed past our boat. Of course, several storm petrels remained unidentified, but we did manage to get decent views of at least two European Storm Petrels (though alas no pictures!). The toes projecting beyond the tail that are diagnostic of Wilson’s are more or less visible on the pictures below.

O. oceanicus Dakar 1 01102018 - A Araujo

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (A. Araujo)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2362 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2343 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

 

Up next: skuas, or jaegers as our American friends call them. We didn’t see many, with just three Pomarines and just as few Arctic Skuas, as well as an obliging Long-tailed Skua. The latter was an interesting bird that we aged as a third-summer moulting into third-winter plumage. It briefly joined two Pomarine Skuas (second-year birds?) allowing for nice comparisons of size and structure.

 

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3325

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3327

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

Long-tailed Dakar 01102018 - A Araujo - cropped

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (A. Araujo)

Long-tailed - Pomarine Skua - DSC_2305 - B Mast

Long-tailed & Pomarine Skuas / Labbes à longue queue & pomarin (B. Mast)

Pomarin Skua - DSC_2348 - B Mast

Pomarine Skuas / Labbes pomarins (B. Mast)

 

Rounding up our seabirds is this Red (Grey…) Phalarope (Phalarope à bec large), the only one we saw during the trip but somehow Bruce managed to get a picture:

Red Phalarope - DSC_2276 - B Mast

Red Phalarope / Phalarope à bec large (B. Mast)

 

As seems to be quite often the case during these pelagic trips, some landbirds were also encountered, in our case European Turtle Dove (Tourterelle des bois) of which we twice saw singles migrating over the ocean (in October 2016, the PAOC pelagic recorded at least three species of passerines, including a migrating Bluethroat). One of our doves had a very worn and messy plumage, probably a moulting young bird:

European Turtle Dove - DSC_2266 - B Mast

European Turtle Dove / Tourterelle des bois (B. Mast)

 

Our complete eBird checklist, expertly compiled by Miguel, can be found here. We really ought to add the Osprey that can just about be seen sitting on top of the Almadies lighthouse, but which was noticed only later on this neat picture by Bruce of the lighthouse – Africa’s westernmost building, constructed some time in the 19th century (precise date seems unknown?) on a reef that lies just off the Pointe des Almadies.

Phare des Almadies - DSC_2388 - B Mast

Le phare des Almadies… and an Osprey (B. Mast)

 

 

Many thanks to Antonio and Bruce for sharing their pictures!

 

 

%d bloggers like this: