Archive by Author | bram

AGPs again

Quick note to report Senegal’s 12th and 13th American Golden Plovers, a species that is now near-annual here but which always remains a good find.

We found the first of the season last weekend at lac Mbeubeusse (north of Keur Massar) which we visited early afternoon on our way back from a very enjoyable trip to Popenguine – more on that visit in an upcoming post. Both the date (3 November) and the location are rather typical for this wader: out of the 11 previous records, eight are from the Dakar region, and three were obtained between mid-October and mid-December. Paul had already seen a bird in the same location back in March 2013: needless to say that lac Mbeubeusse ought to be visited much more frequently than just a handful of times per year: pretty much every visit is bound to turn up something good. As always we can only speculate about the number of Nearctic vagrants that pass through Senegal every year or that end up spending the winter here…

Mbeubeusse_20181103_IMG_4683

Lac Mbeubeuss(e)

 

After spotting what looked like a suspicious Pluvialis plover (= anything but a Grey Plover), based on the fairly contrasted plumage, seemingly long-bodied and long-legged appearance combined with a small-ish bill, we had to wait a while, gradually approaching the lake’s edge, before we could confirm that it was indeed a “Lesser” Golden Plover (= American or Pacific GP). The important primary projection with wing tips reaching well beyond the tail, bronzy rump and lower back, dark-capped head with distinctive pale supercilium and forehead, and most significantly at one point the bird stretched its wings upwards which allowed us to see the grey underwing. Everything else about the bird was pretty standard for a first-year American Golden Plover. Bingo!

AmericanGoldenPlover_Mbeubeusse_20181103_IMG_4676

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

 

To get a sense of the potential of lac Mbeubeusse for waders and other waterbirds, check out our eBird checklist: other good birds here included hundreds of Northern Shovelers and many GarganeysRuffsLittle Stints and Common Ringed Plovers, several Curlew Sandpipers and Dunlins, quite a few Audouin’s Gulls, a few terns including all three species of Chlidonias marsh terns, 124 Greater Flamingos, at least one Red-rumped Swallow, etc. etc. All this with Dakar’s giant rubbish tip as a backdrop, spewing black smoke and gradually covering the niaye in a thick layer of waste on its western edge… quite a sad contrast with all the bird life. And definitely not the most idyllic birding hotspot!

AudouinsGull_Mbeubeusse_20181103_IMG_4681

Audouin’s Gull / Goéland d’Audouin

 

Number 13 was found by Mark Finn barely a week later, on Friday Nov. 9th, at one of the lagoons near Pointe Sarène, south of Mbour. As I happened to spend the weekend at nearby Nianing and was planning on visiting Sarène anyway, I went there the following day and easily located the bird, an adult moulting into winter plumage. Unlike the previous bird, it was actively feeding on the shores of a seasonal pond surrounded by pastures and fields, along with several other waders including Ruff, Redshank, Greenshank, RedshankWood Sandpiper, Green Sandpiper, Marsh Sandpiper, TurnstoneCommon Sandpiper, and Common Snipe. This appears to be the first record along the Petite Côte south of Dakar, at a site that has great potential for shorebirds and other migrants: around Nianing, Sarène and Mbodiène are several seasonal lakes that fill up during the rains, as well as coastal saltwater (or brackish) lagoons as can be seen on the map below. The marker shows where the AGP was feeding on Saturday.

 

Despite being a bit distant I managed some decent record shots of the bird, but unfortunately my camera was stolen later in the weekend… so these pictures are lost forever to humanity. Not that I would have won any prizes with them. So no more blurred pictures from the field on this blog for a little while.

The Sarène bird looked pretty much like this one, just slightly less black on the chest:

AmericanGoldenPlover_Technopole_20180408_IMG_1689

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé (Technopole, April 2018)

 

Anyway, as I think we’ve already mentioned in the past, “AGP” is the most frequent Nearctic wader in Senegal and more generally in West Africa, followed by Buff-breasted Sandpiper (nine Senegalese records so far) and Lesser Yellowlegs (eight). See this post for a list of the first eight known AGP records for Senegal. Since then (spring 2017), the following sightings are to be added:

  • April-May 2017: an adult and two 2nd c.y. birds from 17.4 – 1.5 at least, with a fourth bird (= technically an additional record) up to 21.5., at Technopole (BP, Theo Peters, Wim Mullié, Miguel Lecoq, Ross Wanless, Justine Dosso)
  • 8 April 2018: an adult or 2nd c.y. at Technopole (BP) – photos above and more info here.
  • 3 November 2018: one 1st c.y. at lac Mbeubeusse, Dakar (BP, Gabriel Caucanas, Miguel Lecoq, Ross Wanless)
  • 9-10 November 2018: one ad. at Sarène, Thiès region (M. Finn et al., BP)

Out of these 12 records, eight are from Dakar (mostly Technopole of course!), just one from the north – the first country record, in 1979 – and two are from Basse-Casamance where the species may well winter, at least occasionally. And six of these records are from just the past four years: one in 2015, four birds in 2017, and now already three birds this year.  American Golden Plovers tend to mainly show up in spring (April-May) and in autumn (Oct.-Nov.) as shown in this little chart below; it’s also in spring that they linger the longest: in spring 2017, Technopole saw a continued presence during five weeks, involving at least four different birds. Note that birds that stayed for several days across two months are counted in both months.

AGP_Chart_Nov2018

American Golden Plover records

 

A few more hazy pictures from the Mbeubeusse bird:

AmericanGoldenPlover_Mbeubeusse_20181103_IMG_4671

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

 

AmericanGoldenPlover_Mbeubeusse_20181103_IMG_4659

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

 

 

 

Advertisements

Northern Senegal after the rains, 3-7 Oct. (Part I)

Ever since our first expedition to the Moyenne Vallée back in January I’ve been keen to return to this little-known part of Senegal, mainly to see whether our Horus Swifts would be still around and to find out what the rains season would bring here. Early October I had the chance to finally head back out there: here’s a glimpse of our five-day road trip to the Far North.

Where to start? We’ll take it in chronological order!

 

Day 1: Dakar to Lampsar lodge via Trois-Marigots

A pit stop at the lac Tanma bridge and a couple of brief stops at Mboro produced a few waders and Greater Swamp Warbler (niaye near the abandoned Hotel du Lac), African Swamphen and Levaillant’s Cuckoo (ponds at the start of the road to Diogo; Rousserolle des cannes, Talève d’Afrique, Coucou de Levaillant). From there it was pretty much non-stop all the way to the Trois-Marigots, an important wetland complex just past Saint-Louis. All lush and teeming with bird life following abundant rains in previous weeks, I could have easily spent half a day here but unfortunately could only spare a couple of hours before moving on to the Lampsar lodge.

Herons, egrets, ducks, waders, bishops and weavers were everywhere, many of them in full breeding attire and actively singing and displaying while Marsh Harriers (Busard des roseaux) were hunting over the wetlands. Two adult Eurasian Coots were the most unexpected species, and I already got a good flavour of things to come in the next few days: Spur-winged Geese flying around, noisy River Prinias everywhere, a distant singing Savile’s Bustard, lots of Collared Pratincoles, a BrubruWoodchat Shrike, etc. etc. (Oie-armée, Prinia aquatique, Outarde de Savile, Glaréole à collier, Brubru, Pie-grièche a tête rousse)

PurpleHeron_TroisMarigots_20181003_IMG_3345

Purple Heron / Heron pourpré

EurasianCoot_TroisMarigots_20181003_IMG_3351

Eurasian Coot / Foulque macroule

Just like at Trois-Marigots, Yellow-crowned and Northern Red Bishops were very active in the fields around the Lampsar lodge, where quite a few northern songbirds were noted during a short walk at dusk: Western Olivaceous Warbler, Common Redstart, Garden Warbler, White Wagtail and many Yellow Wagtails – at least 135 flying towards a night roost on the other side of the Lampsar river (Euplectes vorabé et monseigneur, Hypolais obscure, Rougequeue à front blanc, Fauvette des jardins, Bergeronnettes grises et printanières). The Lampsar lodge certainly seems like a good base to explore this part of the Senegal delta, being located close the Djoudj and other birding hotspots in the area.

Day 2: Ndiael, Richard-Toll, Thille Boubacar to Gamadji Sare

Two Black-crowned Cranes were calling opposite the lodge at dawn, while Greater Swamp Warbler was singing along the Lampsar; the rice paddies and surrounding farmland held Winding Cisticola, River Prinia, and several waders including Common Snipe (Grue couronnée, Rousserolle des cannes, Cisticole roussâtre, Prinia aquatique, Bécassine des marais).

GreaterBlueearedGlossyStarling_Lampsar_20181003_IMG_3372

Greater Blue-eared Glossy Starling / Choucador à oreillons bleus

But we were just warming up… time to get serious. Vieux Ngom joined me at Lampsar from where we set off for the Ndiaël fauna reserve. Vieux is one of Senegal’s most enthusiastic and skilled birders, based out of the Djoudj as an eco-guide and is a great companion in the field – it was an absolute pleasure to spend the next few days in his company!

So, the Réserve Spéciale de Faune de Ndiaël: I’d only visited a couple of times before, and this was my first visit during the rains. The usually barren plains and dry acacia scrub were now all green, full of water, ponds with water lilies, acacias blooming, dragonflies hunting and butterflies fluttering everywhere… and birds of course: several Egyptian and Spur-winged Geese, a Knob-billed Duck, hundreds of White-faced Whistling Ducks (and one Fulvous Whistling Duck), two distant Black Storks and a Black-headed Heron, a couple of European Turtle-Doves, vocal Woodland Kingfishers (Ouette d’Egypte, Oie-armée, Canard à bosse, Dendrocygnes veufs et fauves, Cigognes noires, Héron mélanocéphale, Tourterelle des bois, Martin-chasseur du Sénégal). More Collared Pratincoles, a Montagu’s Harrier, and as we were watching the ducks and waders near the marigot de (N)yéti Yone, Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse started to appear in small flocks, flying hurriedly over the plain (Glaréole à collier, Busard cendré, Ganga à ventre brun). On the way back along the track, a few of these birds were bathing and drinking from small roadside pools. Oh and sparrow-larks everywhere, mainly Chestnut-backed but also a few Black-crowned Sparrow-larks. Over a hundred Sand Martins were feeding over the plain, with several Common Swifts also passing through (Moinelettes à oreillons blancs et à front blanc, Hirondelle de rivage, Martinet noir).

ChestnutbelliedSandgrouse_Ndiael_20181004_IMG_3425

Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse / Ganga à ventre brun

WoodchatShrike_Ndiael_20181004_IMG_3381

Woodchat Shrike / Pie-grièche à tête rousse juv.

 

Next up: Richard Toll, where we paid a brief visit to the aerodrome area, known to attract some good species in winter but rarely visited at this time of the year (this actually applies to pretty much all sites we explored). Our first Southern Grey Shrikes were seen here, as were Green Bee-eater, Tree Pipit, Singing Bush-Lark, Chestnut-bellied Starling, and more (Pie-grièche méridionale, Guêpier de Perse, Pipit des arbres, Alouette chanteuse, Choucador à ventre roux).

Time to move on… with just 110 km to cover until Gamadji Sare, we could afford making a few more stops en route. First of all at the wetland past Thille Boubacar, where a quick scan from the bridge by Ndiayene Pendao produced two Egyptian Plovers (Pluvian). The pond on the other side of the river, which back in January had yielded quite a lot of good birds, was harder to access because its surrounding were all flooded, making it difficult to get decent views of the main water body. So no Pygmy Geese this time round. Several Black Herons and African Darters were around, while a European Pied Flycatcher and a few Subalpine Warblers were feeding in the acacia woodland (Héron ardoisé, Anhinga, Gobemouche noir, Fauvette passerinette).

PiedFlycatcher_NdiayenePendao_20181004_IMG_3454

European Pied Flycatcher / Gobemouche noir

An adult Short-toed Eagle was seen flying over the road, and a couple more stops produced our first Cricket Warblers of the trip, more singing Black-crowned Sparrow-larks, breeding Sudan Golden Sparrows, and Vieux was lucky to see a Fulvous Babbler (Circaète Jean-le-Blanc, Prinia à front écailleux, Moinelette à front blanc, Moineau doré, Cratérope fauve). Alas no Golden Nightjar which we searched for in an area where it is known to winter.

And at long last, we arrived at Gamadji Sare, just in time for another hour’s worth of birding – No Time to Loose! – and of course we were more than eager to find out whether those mystery swifts were still going to be around. I’d barely walked through the back door of the Jardins du Fouta hotel, and there they were: a handful of Horus Swifts were flying over the river, confirming our suspicions that the species is well established here and that our sightings from January (and Fred’s in February) were not of some vagrant groupe of birds. At least 10 birds were seen several times, often flying close to the cliff’s edge while calling excitedly, and entering disused Blue-cheeked Bee-eater nest holes as night was falling. Unlike in January, the bee-eater colony was in full swing, with dozens of birds noisily feeding young in and out of the nest holes.

Horus Swift: check!

Mission accomplished.

 

A short walk along the Doué river produced migrants such as Orphean and Bonelli’s Warblers, Pied and Spotted Flycatcher, and more Black Scrub Robins and Cricket Warblers (Fauvette orphée, Pouillot de Bonelli, Gobemouches noirs et gris, Agrobate podobé, Prinia à front écailleux).

Birding non-stop… what a day!

Day 3: Gamadji Sare, Podor and Dagana

Difficult for things to get even better than the previous day, right?

We spent some more time studying the swifts and observing their behaviour and trying to count them. Not an easy feat as the numbers kept fluctuating, with small groups appearing and disappearing constantly, and at one point there were some Pallid and Little Swifts mixed in with the Horus Swifts. In the end, we settled on a conservative minimum of about 45 birds, probably even more like 50 to 60! So more than double than our estimate in January. Trying to get some decent pictures proved to be even more difficult, most of my pictures resembling this:

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3595

Trust me it’s a Horus Swift

Or even this:

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3626

At least I got its shadow

More on the swifts may follow in an upcoming post. In any case, it’s pretty clear now that the species is well established and it would be surprising if they didn’t in fact breed here. And that other sites along the Senegal and Niger rivers and their tributaries are probably waiting to be discovered.

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3651

At least 16 Horus Swifts are visible in this picture! (click to enlarge)

Further along the river bank we saw pretty much the same species as the previous evening, plus HamerkopLanner, Pallid SwiftGosling’s Bunting to name but a few (Ombrette, Lanier, Martinet pâle, Bruant d’Alexander).

WhitefrontedBeeeater_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3514

White-throated Bee-eater / Guêpier à gorge blanche

WhiteWagtail_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3567

White Wagtail / Bergeronnette grise

GoslingsBunting_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3611

Gosling’s Bunting/ / Bruant d’Alexander

A quick breakfast and some birding in the gardens which held Red-throated Bee-eater – just when we thought they were no longer around – and an unexpected Wryneck among many others; we then decided to go out to the rice paddies and the fields just to the north-east of the village (Guêpier à gorge rouge, Torcol fourmilier). Not really knowing what to expect, we weren’t disappointed: Bluethroat! Whinchat! Dwarf Bittern! …all species that in Senegal are tricky to see in one way or another (Gorgebleue à miroir, Tarier des prés, Blongios de Stürm!). The bittern was particularly cooperative: after it was accidentally flushed by Vieux, it landed on top of a bush, showing off its unique plumage – nice to finally catch up with this little beauty in Senegal (bringing my country list to 498 species!).

DwarfBittern_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3710

Dwarf Bittern / Blongios de Stürm

EurasianReedWarbler_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3750

Eurasian Reed Warbler / Rousserolle effarvatte

YellowcrownedBishop_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3722

Yellow-crowned Bishop / Euplecte vorabé

All in all, we got to see no less than 90 species in a single morning, all within walking distance from the guesthouse: pretty impressive I say. See the complete eBird checklist here.

We were now half way through our little expedition so it was already time to return west, to Dagana via Podor. This section, as well as days 4 (Foret de Bokhol, Richard-Toll again, Ross Bethio to Gandiol) and 5 (Langue de Barbarie and the Gandiol area, back to Dakar) will be covered in an upcoming Part II of this post… Thanks for reading up to here!

 

 

Au fond du PNNK

John Rose et Dimitri Dagorne nous présentent les résultats d’un récent périple dans le Niokolo-Koba, le dernier d’une série d’inventaires menés par un petit groupe de passionnés du parc. Merci à eux!

 

Le Parc National du Niokolo-Koba (PNNK) est une aire protégée de 913 000 hectares, retranchée au sud-est du Sénégal à la frontière de la Guinée. Depuis sa création en 1954 il fut le théâtre de nombreux tourments : braconnage, invasion de plantes exotiques, exploitation destructrice des ressources naturelles, tensions avec les habitants expulsés. Mais les efforts accrus de conservation depuis plusieurs années semblent avoir redonné un souffle de vie à ce qui est à présent un des rares grands sanctuaires de biodiversité d’Afrique de l’Ouest.

Pendant cinq ans (2012-2017) l’association française COMETE International (dissoute le 27/1/18), en se coordonnant avec d’autres organismes d’appui comme l’Association des Naturalistes des Yvelines (ANY), le Centre Ornithologique Île-de-France (ex-CORIF, absorbé par la LPO), l’African Bird Club, l’association sénégalaise NCD, et l’UNESCO, a soutenu les efforts des communautés locales pour la valorisation du parc et le développement durable des zones alentour. C’est avec la coopérative des guides du Parc National du Niokolo-Koba (GIE NIOKOLO) qu’ont été ainsi menées une quinzaine d’inventaires ornithologiques avec la collaboration des autorités du parc (Direction des Parcs Nationaux) et une demi-douzaine de voyages touristiques équitables, activités qui relevaient au total environ 4 000 observations de 259 espèces d’oiseaux dans la partie centrale “touristique” du PNNK et ses proches alentours.

Le but principal du voyage actuel, parrainé sur le plan scientifique par l’ANY, était de prospecter les zones du PNNK pas encore explorées dans le cadre de ce projet. Il a été planifié par deux membres de l’équipe scientifique du projet (Dimitri et John) et rejoint par un troisième naturaliste amateur, Jean-Jacques Pailler. Les zones ciblées dans l’est, le sud et l’ouest du parc ne sont accessibles qu’en fin de saison sèche (avril jusqu’à mi-juin) quand les gués sur le fleuve Gambie sont navigables, et nous avons visé la période tardive juste au début des pluies pour éviter le plus fort de la canicule, et pour pouvoir observer des migrateurs intra-africains venant des forêts guinéennes et équatoriales.

Itinéraire Niokolo-Koba

 

Arrivés à l’aéroport de Dakar dans la soirée du 31 mai 2018, nous nous faisons conduire le lendemain dans notre pickup 4×4 à Dialacoto, grand village chef-lieu de la commune de ce nom situé à 480 km de Dakar et à une dizaine de kilomètres de l’entrée principale du PNNK. Le lendemain nous expérimentons, en compagnie de neuf guides du GIE NIOKOLO, un nouveau circuit ornithologique pédestre dans la forêt de Diambour juste au nord de Dialacoto (carte du circuit ici). La savane boisée, bien que proche des activités humaines, offre un sentiment d’immersion dans une nature isolée. Paysages métamorphosés par les saisons, à cette période sèche nous observerons un total de 37 espèces d’oiseaux dont le Bucorve d’Abyssinie, l’Amadine cou-coupé, un groupe d’Hirondelles à ventre roux, et un vol de 61 Pélicans blancs se dirigeant vers le nord (probablement vers le Parc National des Oiseaux de Djoudj qui est leur principal lieu de reproduction) (Abyssinian Ground Hornbill, Cut-throat, Rufous-chested Swallow, Great White Pelican). Ce circuit fait dorénavant partie de l’offre de tourisme ornithologique des guides ainsi familiarisés.

Après une nuit tranquille passée au campement Chez Ibrahima à la frontière du parc, nous pénétrons enfin les terres du PNNK, accompagnés de notre guide du GIE Banna Kanté et du lieutenant Assane Fall, mis à disposition par la Direction des Parcs Nationaux au vu du caractère scientifique de notre mission. Arrivés à Simenti sur le fleuve Gambie, nous étions contents de voir que l’hôtel, seul lieu d’hébergement confortable à l’intérieur du parc avant sa fermeture deux ans auparavant, était en train d’être remis en état pour réouverture pour la prochaine saison touristique (la saison sèche, de décembre à mai). Le tableau qui se présente à nous à la mare de Simenti adjacente est révélateur d’une saison 2017/18 particulièrement aride. Ce plan d’eau peu profond, qui accueille normalement un cortège d’échassiers et de limicoles pataugeant entre les crocodiles, était réduit à quelques pièces d’eau et bains de boue pour phacochères. Nous terminerons la journée au Campement du Lion géré par le GIE, où les murmures de la faune nocturne berceront notre sommeil.

Dès l’aube de notre deuxième jour dans le parc, installés sur un rocher en bord du fleuve Gambie, nous accompagnerons l’éveil de la savane. A quelques mètres de nous les couleurs encore ternes d’une Rhynchée peinte (Greater Painted-Snipe) s’illuminent doucement sous les premières lueurs de la journée. Il est l’heure de poursuivre nos inventaires, et confortablement installés dans la benne du 4×4, nous traversons le Gambie au Gué de Damantan pour atteindre pour la première fois la moitié sud du PNNK. Notre méthode d’inventaire est de rouler à moins de 15 km/h en nous arrêtant le temps nécessaire d’identifier chaque oiseau rencontré. Nous saisissons ainsi les données géolocalisées sur le terrain, au moyen des applis smartphone eBird pour toutes les espèces et celle de l’observatoire participatif African Raptor DataBank pour les rapaces.

Notre premier inventaire matinal de 32 km, sur la piste entre le Gué de Damantan et Barka Bandiel, était ponctué par un arrêt au mausolée d’un imam vénéré à Damantan, ce village évacué lors d’un agrandissement du parc qui reste toujours un important site de pèlerinage. Pour l’inventaire suivant, nous suivions sur 30 km la piste jusqu’à Oubadji, avant que nous soyons obligés d’atteindre en hâte au crépuscule ce dernier village à la frontière extérieure du Parc. Le campement communautaire, où nous avons passé la nuit, est aussi rudimentaire dans son confort que son cadre est merveilleux. Le petit déjeuner en plein air du lendemain nous offrira un spectacle matinal de nombreux oiseaux dont le Coucou de Klaas, le Cubla de Gambie, et le Touraco violet (Klaas’s Cuckoo, Northern Puffback, Violet Turaco).

Violet Turaco Touraco violet (Dimitri Dagorne)

Violet Turaco / Touraco violet (© D. Dagorne)

Peu après avoir quitté Oubadji, nous observons notre première nouvelle espèce d’oiseau pour le PNNK (par rapport aux inventaires précédents), un choucador (“merle métallique”) perché au sommet d’un petit arbre : un Choucador de Swainson.

Lesser Blue-eared Starling Choucador de Swainson (Dimitri Dagorne)

Lesser Blue-eared Glossy Starling / Choucador de Swainson (© D. Dagorne)

Nous poursuivons en traversant de nouveau le Gambie au Gué de Malapa, qui n’est en vérité qu’une traversée non balisée du très large lit desséché et rocailleux du fleuve. Puis nous suivons vers l’est la rive droite du fleuve qui forme la frontière sud du parc. C’est alors que nous ferons une observation très rare de trois Amarantes de Kulikoro, oiseau réputé jusqu’à très récemment d’être absent du PNNK. La peine pour la traversée et la distance nous séparant de notre prochain campement nous contraignent à arrêter notre inventaire après 66 km de piste très difficiles et à finir le trajet de nuit ; nous bivouaquerons au plateau du Mont Assirik à la station de recherche sur les chimpanzés, grâce à une autorisation spéciale des autorités du parc.

Mali Firefinch Amarante de Kulikoro (Dimitri Dagorne)

Mali Firefinch / Amarante de Kulikoro (© D. Dagorne)

Nous consacrons notre quatrième jour dans le PNNK à explorer à pied les abords du Mont Assirik, la seule zone où les visiteurs sont autorisés à se déplacer à pied. Nous partirons à l’ascension du sommet, point culminant du parc à 311 mètres. Perdus dans nos comptes par les nombreuses nuées de passereaux multi-spécifiques s’enchaînant aux sommets des arbres, nous observons 11 Loriots dorés (African Golden Oriole) dont un groupe de sept en vol bas. Autre observation notable : quatre Pluviers de Forbes déambulant autour d’une petite pièce d’eau. Sur le chemin du retour, juste avant d’arriver au campement, un tourbillon de vent est soudain tombé sur nous, apportant à seulement quelques mètres un jeune Bateleur des savannes.

Forbes' Plover Pluvier de Forbes(Dimitri Dagorne)

Forbes’s Plover / Pluvier de Forbes (© D. Dagorne)

Bateleur (Dimitri Dagorne)

Bateleur (© D. Dagorne)

Après le déjeuner nous descendrons dans la Vallée de Stella légèrement en contrebas du campement pour poursuivre dans un étroit lit de rivière. La forêt galerie est dense, nos observations seront furtives et fragmentaires. Un œil sublimement maquillé, une crête verte et des ailes violettes, Dimitri reconnaît là le Touraco vert (Green Turaco). Une petite gorge d’un jaune éclatant sur un oiseau sombre, il s’agit d’une paire de Bulbuls à gorge claire (Yellow-throated Leaflove). Tous les deux sont des nouvelles espèces pour nous, l’observation du touraco loin de ses territoires de base à l’extérieur du parc est particulièrement significative. Dans les feuilles d’un palmier, un Noircap loriot occupé à la construction de son nid se laisse observer en toute indiscrétion. Posée dans une fourche cachée par un amas de branches, nous apercevons une Tourterelle d’Adamaoua (Adamawa Turtle-Dove).

Oriole Warbler Noircap loriot (Dimitri Dagorne)

Oriole Warbler / Noircap loriot (© D. Dagorne)

Le lendemain matin, Dimitri a pu observer près du campement un Traquet familier, notre cinquième nouvelle espèce qui, bien qu’assez commune dans l’extrême sud-est du pays, n’a été observée auparavant qu’une seule fois dans le parc (par Geoffrey Monchaux en janvier 2018 dans la même zone). Il fallut quitter à regret le Mont Assirik pour retourner au Campement du Lion par une longue route en trois étapes d’inventaire dans le sud du PNNK, très, très sec, et décevante du côté ornitho.

Lors de notre dernière matinée au parc, nous observons aux abords du fleuve Gambie un Martin-pêcheur azuré, assez rare et surtout très discret, et un couple de Grues couronnées (Shining-blue Kingfisher & Black Crowned Crane). Nous prenons la route vers la sortie du PNNK pour nous retrouver au confort à l’hôtel de Wassadou, l’objet d’un récent rapportage dans ce blog. L’hôtel se trouve sur la rive droite du fleuve Gambie, la rive d’en face faisant partie du PNNK. Embarqués sur le fleuve le lendemain matin dans la petite pirogue à moteur de l’hôtel, nous observons de nouveau la Tourterelle d’Adamaoua et le Martin-pêcheur azuré, puis nous voyons perchée côté PNNK une magnifique Chouette-pêcheuse de Pel, notre sixième nouvelle espèce. Revenus à terre, nous observons une seconde chouette cachée sur la rive de la rivière Niériko qui se jette dans le Gambie au niveau de l’hôtel.

Chouette-pêcheuse de Pel (Dimitri Dagorne)

Pel’s Fishing Owl / Chouette-pêcheuse de Pel (© D. Dagorne)

Dans le PNNK et ses proches alentours, nous avons observé 148 espèces d’oiseaux dont six nouvelles pour notre projet, soit un total de 265 espèces sur les quelques 360 signalées dans la littérature scientifique et archives d’observations (y compris les visiteurs passagers ou égarés). Une publication scientifique présentant les résultats du projet est en cours de préparation.

Nous partons en fin de matinée du 9 juin pour la Réserve Naturelle Communautaire de Boundou, située à environ 115 km au nord-est de Wassadou, que nous explorons pendant deux jours avant de reprendre la route pour l’aéroport via la Réserve Naturelle de Somone. Au total, nous aurons admiré lors de ce riche et intense voyage 193 espèces d’oiseaux, 21 de mammifères et plusieurs reptiles et invertébrés intéressants (voir les listes présentées dans le rapport complet disponible ici). Vos questions ou commentaires peuvent être postés ci-dessous ou adressés à John Rose.

 

Shining-blue Kingfisher Martin-pêcheur azuré (Dimitri Dagorne)

Shining-blue Kingfisher / Martin-pêcheur azuré, Camp du Lion (© D. Dagorne)

 

 

Pelagic trip off Ngor

Why would two Portuguese, a Mauritanian, a Cape-Verdian, a French, an American and a Belgian set off on a boat trip one morning in October? Seabirds of course! With Gabriel in town, Bruce over from the US, Miguel and Antonio as motivated as ever to get out of the office and to have some of their BirdLife colleagues strengthen their seabird id skills, it was time to organise our now annual autumn pelagic, on October 1st.

Conditions were perfect to get out on our small boat (organised through Nautilus Diving: merci Hilda!) though probably a bit too calm for active seabird migration. We chose to head straight west to the edge of the continental shelf, rather than try the “trawler area” off Kayar as this is quite a bit more distant from Ngor. Needless to say that expectations were high as is always the case during these rare opportunities to get close views of the treasured tubenoses – storm petrels, shearwaters – skuas and maybe some Grey Phalaropes or Sabine’s Gulls.

NgorPlage_20181002_IMG_3333

Ngor plage

 

A Manx Shearwater zooming past the boat was one of the first pelagic species we got to see, followed by quite a few Sooty Shearwaters (Puffin fuligineux).

SootyShearwater_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3289

Sooty Shearwater / Puffin fuligineux (BP)

 

Further out, Wilson’s Storm Petrel became the dominant species, with a few dozen birds seen – and probably many more that went undetected – particularly around the upwelling area. Almost all were obviously actively migrating, and we managed to get some good views of several of them as they zoomed past our boat. Of course, several storm petrels remained unidentified, but we did manage to get decent views of at least two European Storm Petrels (though alas no pictures!). The toes projecting beyond the tail that are diagnostic of Wilson’s are more or less visible on the pictures below.

O. oceanicus Dakar 1 01102018 - A Araujo

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (A. Araujo)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2362 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2343 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

 

Up next: skuas, or jaegers as our American friends call them. We didn’t see many, with just three Pomarines and just as few Arctic Skuas, as well as an obliging Long-tailed Skua. The latter was an interesting bird that we aged as a third-summer moulting into third-winter plumage. It briefly joined two Pomarine Skuas (second-year birds?) allowing for nice comparisons of size and structure.

 

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3325

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3327

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

Long-tailed Dakar 01102018 - A Araujo - cropped

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (A. Araujo)

Long-tailed - Pomarine Skua - DSC_2305 - B Mast

Long-tailed & Pomarine Skuas / Labbes à longue queue & pomarin (B. Mast)

Pomarin Skua - DSC_2348 - B Mast

Pomarine Skuas / Labbes pomarins (B. Mast)

 

Rounding up our seabirds is this Red (Grey…) Phalarope (Phalarope à bec large), the only one we saw during the trip but somehow Bruce managed to get a picture:

Red Phalarope - DSC_2276 - B Mast

Red Phalarope / Phalarope à bec large (B. Mast)

 

As seems to be quite often the case during these pelagic trips, some landbirds were also encountered, in our case European Turtle Dove (Tourterelle des bois) of which we twice saw singles migrating over the ocean (in October 2016, the PAOC pelagic recorded at least three species of passerines, including a migrating Bluethroat). One of our doves had a very worn and messy plumage, probably a moulting young bird:

European Turtle Dove - DSC_2266 - B Mast

European Turtle Dove / Tourterelle des bois (B. Mast)

 

Our complete eBird checklist, expertly compiled by Miguel, can be found here. We really ought to add the Osprey that can just about be seen sitting on top of the Almadies lighthouse, but which was noticed only later on this neat picture by Bruce of the lighthouse – Africa’s westernmost building, constructed some time in the 19th century (precise date seems unknown?) on a reef that lies just off the Pointe des Almadies.

Phare des Almadies - DSC_2388 - B Mast

Le phare des Almadies… and an Osprey (B. Mast)

 

 

Many thanks to Antonio and Bruce for sharing their pictures!

 

 

Le Technopôle enfin protégé!

 

Tant attendue et espérée, on n’osait plus trop y croire mais finalement la nouvelle est tombée lundi dernier: la “Grande Niaye de Pikine”, soit le Technopole, est désormais officiellement protégée!!

Le Ministère de l’Environnement et du Développement durable a annoncé que le Technopole “et ses dependances” seront “contenues dans une Réserve naturelle communale de Biodiversité, en rapport avec les Collectivités territoriales limitrophes.” Cette zone humide d’importance internationale sera donc, à juste titre, inscrite dans la Convention Ramsar – la neuvième en son genre au Senegal, après Tocc-Tocc (au bord du lac de Guiers), le parc national du Djoudj, les réserves de Ndiael, Guembeul, Somone, et Palmarin, le PN du Delta du Saloum, et enfin Kallisaye en Casamance.

Le communiqué de presse peut être consulté ici sur le site de l’Agence de Presse Sénégalaise.

 

Technopole_Waders_20160806_IMG_4525

 

Je salue ici le combat mené de longue date par l’association NCD, qui a su rassembler les divers acteurs, et notamment le Ministère de l’Environnement, maraîchers et autres usagers, et même la Fédération de golf. J’espère que l’association saura mobiliser les ressources et répondre aux attentes pour améliorer la gestion du site, et que les autorités – notamment la police de l’environnement – pourront infléchir la destruction progressive du Technopole. en particulier la lutte contre le dumping sauvage quotidien d’ordures mais aussi contre le grignotage immobilier (lire à ce propos cette histoire assez édifiante mais malheureusement trop courante au Sénégal, sur la tentative d’implantation illégale d’une entreprise au Technopole).

Espérons également que d’autres sites suivront, car de nombreuses lagunes, niayes et autres marais côtiers du pays méritent tout autant d’être protégés – je pense notamment au lacs Rose, Tanma, Mbeubeusse et Malika, ou encore les lagunes de Yène et Nianing et Pointe Sarène.

La protection formelle du Technopole n’est bien sûr qu’une première étape: vu le potentiel en termes d’accueil des amateurs d’oiseaux et de nature, et en matière d’éducation à l’environnement des écoliers et autres riverains, on peut s’imaginer la mise en place d’un vrai centre de visite, des sentiers balisés, voire même la construction d’observatoires comme cela a été fait à la réserve de la Somone notamment.

 

BlacktailedGodwit_Technopole_20171203_IMG_6580

Barges a queue noire (Black-tailed Godwit), l’une des espèces menacées qui utilisent régulièrement le Technopole comme site d’hivernage et d’escale.

 

Petit clin d’œil aux contributions modestes de l’equipe de SenegalWildlife, le communiqué de presse mentionne que 223 espèces d’oiseaux ont déjà été observées sur le site. Ce chiffre est certainement basé sur la liste que nous tenons à jour depuis quelques années, suite à un inventaire initial établi par Betsy Hopkins vers 2005 puis repris par Paul Robinson en 2011-2014.

C’est donc le moment de partager cette liste ici avec vous, qui compte maintenant au moins 230 espèces car ces derniers mois ont vu l’ajout de plusieurs volatiles rares: Bécasseaux rousset et de Baird, Hirondelle à croupion gris, Pouillot ibérique, etc. – toutes des observations plutôt anecdotiques bien entendu, car l’intérêt du Technopole réside bien plus en son importance internationale comme site d’escale et d’hivernage pour des espèces telles que la Spatule blanche, l’Echasse blanche, la Barge à queue noire, le Goéland railleur ou encore la Guifette noire.

 

eurasianspoonbill_technopole_20170226_img_8583

Spatule blanche (Eurasian Spoonbill)

 

La liste mise à jour¹, avec commentaires sur le statut général et le statut de reproduction de chaque espèce au Technopole, se trouve ici sous forme de Google Spreadsheet. Comme toujours, les corrections et compléments sont bien sûr les bienvenus!

Puis pour un acces direct aux articles que SenegalWildlife a consacré ces dernières années à notre hotspot favori de la région dakaroise, il suffit de se rendre sur cette page.

 

GreyPlover_Technopole_20170303_IMG_8956

Limicoles, Goélands railleurs, Sternes hansel et une Guifette moustac au Technopole

 

Maintenant il ne vous reste plus qu’à aller sur place pour y découvrir cette zone humide urbaine tout à fait exceptionnelle – dépaysement garanti!

 

¹ Le Barbican barbu est la derniere espece a s’ajouter a la liste, avec une observation qui nous semble tout a fait credible, de deux individus le 13/10/18 par E. Pilotte (eBird checklist)

 

Suivi de la migration d’automne à Ngor: août et septembre 2018

Depuis un peu plus de deux mois on a repris nos habitudes au Calao de Ngor cet automne (ai-je vraiment arrêté depuis l’an dernier?), pour voir ce que donne le cru 2018 pour ce qui est de la migration d’automne des oiseaux de mer. Le printemps avait déjà été pas mal, avec entre autres de beaux passages de Sternes voyageuses et de Dougall, de Mouettes de Sabine, et quelques espèces plus rares comme le Fou à pieds rouges, le Puffin de Macaronésie / de Barolo ou encore le Puffin majeur. Ayant eu un peu plus de temps libre et moins de voyages que d’habitude, j’ai donc repris le suivi régulier depuis fin juillet. J’étais curieux notamment de mieux suivre les mouvements en août et septembre, et finalement j’ai un peu mieux pu suivre ces deux mois que l’an dernier: entre le 30/7 et le 30/9, j’ai pu assurer une présence lors de 41 jours, pour environ 55 heures de suivi (2017: 40.5 heures sur 31 jours). A propos de notre suivi de l’an dernier, un article sur le suivi de la migration en 2017 est en cours de rédaction et sera partagé ici en temps voulu!

Les années se suivent mais se ne ressemblent pas: certaines espèces sont visiblement plus communes certaines années, et les conditions météo varient pas mal également. Ainsi, le mois d’août 2018 a été marqué par plusieurs jours de vent favorable (= vent soutenu de l’ouest a nord-ouest), et notamment le Labbe à longue queue a été bien plus nombreux a passer devant les cotes dakaroises qu’en 2017 et 2016. Idem pour les Phalaropes à bec large qui comme le labbe voient eux aussi s’établir un nouveau record journalier.

Comme d’hab’, voici donc une liste comme toujours un peu longue et ennuyeuse, agrémentée de quelques photos d’archives.

  • Océanites

Océanite de Wilson (Wilson’s Storm Petrel): au moins 159 oiseaux sont vus entre le 31/7 et le 23/8, avec un max. de 105 en 30′ de suivi le 13/8.

  • Puffins

Puffin du Cap-Vert (Cape Verde Shearwater): 97 ind. passent le 11/8 en 2h40′, suivi d’un isolé sur place le lendemain et deux oiseaux le 20/8.

Puffin fuligineux (Sooty Shearwater): comme en 2017, les premiers oiseaux apparaissent des les premiers jours de septembre, mais cette année les effectifs restent très modestes jusqu’à fin septembre: seulement 87 oiseaux du 2/9 au 30/9 alors que dans la même période l’an dernier il en passent 393 pour un effort comparable.

 

Sooty Shearwater / Puffin fuligineux
Puffin fuligineux / Sooty Shearwater  (Ngor, avril 2015)

Puffin des Anglais (Manx Shearwater): seuls six oiseaux sont détectés pour le moment, sans doute en raison de l’absence de bonnes conditions météo pour les puffins courant septembre, mois qui devrait marquer le pic du passage de cette espèce.

Puffin “d’Audubon” (Audubon’s Shearwater): à l’inverse, ce puffin généralement très pélagique a été vu bien plus que ces dernières années, avec 19 oiseaux pour le moment. Le premier oiseau passe le 11/8, puis le lendemain c’est un Puffin de Barolo qui est observé en migration active, assez près du rivage permettant son identification. Encore un Barolo ou Macaronésie le 28/8, et le 17/9 il y en a pas moins de 14 qui défilent en deux heures dont quelques groupes de 3-4 oiseaux migrant ensemble. Encore deux le 28/9, et peut-être qu’il en suivra encore quelques-uns dans les semaines à venir.

  • Fous

Fou de Bassan (Northern Gannet): un oiseau de 1ère année passe le 23/9 déjà (2017: premier le 18/9, puis un seul en octobre avant le véritable debut du passage début novembre).

Fou brun (Brown Booby): deux le 26 (un adulte et un imm.) et un imm. les 28 et 29/9 étaient probablement des oiseaux locaux en excursion de pêche depuis les îles de la Madeleine.

  • Limicoles

Comme je le disais dans l’intro, l’une des surprises de cette saison a été le passage important de Phalaropes à bec large (Red Phalarope) en août: alors que je n’avais noté aucun oiseau avant le 11/8, ce jour-la j’en dénombre pas moins de 825 en 2h40′ de suivi le matin, plus encore 35 en 40′ le soir – apparemment un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal, à en croire les chiffres a notre disposition. Plus rien les jours suivants, jusqu’au 18/8 lorsque quelques 65 oiseaux passent en deux groupes – toujours aussi difficiles à estimer! – 37 le 20/8, etc. jusqu’au 2/9. Encore 55 le 17/9, pour un total tout à fait honnête de 1256 oiseaux. Sans doute que plusieurs milliers sont passes au total, loin au large ou invisible entre les vagues. Parmi les autres limicoles, retenons le Courlis corlieu (Whimbrel) avec 415 ind., deux Barges rousses (Bar-tailed Godwit), 28 Huîtriers pies (Oystercatcher) dont 13 ce matin, deux groupes de Bécasseaux maubèches (Red Knot), quelques Tournepierres (Turnstone), un Combattant varié (Ruff), deux Grands Gravelots (Common Ringed Plover) et quelques Chevaliers gambettes et guignettes (Common Redshank & Common Sandpiper).

  • Laridés

Mouette de Sabine (Sabine’s Gull): un avant-coureur passe le 30/7 déjà, constituant peut-être bien la premiere observation de juillet pour le site. Passage plus ou moins régulier bien qu’en effectifs très faibles – comme il se doit en août et septembre – du 11 au 22/8 lors d’une période de vents favorables, puis sept le 1/9 et en tout 31 en 2h45 de suivi les 17-18/9. Encore cinq le 24/9 puis plus rien depuis! On attendra donc le gros passage de la deuxième moitie d’octobre pour cette espèce. Peu d’autres laridés pour le moment, mais tout de même à signaler un Goéland leucophée adulte (ou presque) le 23/8.

  • Sternes & Guifettes

Sterne naine (Little Tern): 129 individus pour le moment, soit le même ordre de grandeur que l’an dernier à la même periode (idem pour la Sterne caspienne (Caspian Tern), avec 27 oiseaux au compteur).

Guifette noire (Black Tern): avec 4402 oiseaux, c’est pour l’instant la deuxième espèce la plus nombreuse: pas mal d’oiseaux vers la mi-août, puis petit max. horaire de 460 le 18/9. Au moins une Guifette leucoptère (White-winged Tern) est identifiée le 11/8.

Une Sterne bridée (Bridled Tern) est vue en vol vers le NE le 9/8, suivi d’un individu vers le SW deux jours plus tard, et deux oiseaux (adulte et juv.) sur place le 22/8 – probablement des oiseaux ayant niche aux iles de la Madeleine ou au moins 3-4 couples ont été vus en juillet dernier. Plus surprenante, une jeune Sterne fuligineuse (Sooty Tern) passe vers le SW le matin du 17/9, ma première obs de l’espèce ici et en fait première obs tout court – coche √ 🙂

 

BridledTern_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170624_IMG_2758
Sterne bridée / Bridled Tern (Iles de la Madeleine, June 2017)

Sterne de Dougall (Roseate Tern): avec 133 Dougall dénombrés, on dépasse déjà d’un tiers l’effectif total de l’an dernier, avec un maximum de 41 oiseaux en 2h de suivi le 17/9. Toujours sympa de voir cette belle espèce, dont le statut de conservation en Europe est plutôt précaire avec des effectifs ne dépassant pas les 1900 couples au début des années 2000, essentiellement aux Açores et en Irlande.

Sternes pierregarin et Sterne arctique (Common & Arctic Terns): 8760 ind., en flot plus ou moins continu depuis le démarrage du suivi. La Sterne arctique était visiblement l’espèce dominante en août et début septembre, mais actuellement la tendance est en train de s’inverser, et la Pierregarin devrait logiquement être la plus commune courant octobre et novembre.

Sterne voyageuse (Lesser Crested Tern): au moins 187, généralement en groupes de 2-3 oiseaux suivant les Sternes caugeks, rarement plus d’une dizaine par heure.

Sterne caugek (Sandwich Tern): Troisième espèce la plus nombreuse, avec 2429 migrateurs pour le moment, dont 2000 passent dans la 2e moitié de septembre.

Sterne royale africaine (African Royal Tern): déjà 897 oiseaux, soit un peu plus du double de l’an dernier. Environ 45% de cet effectif défile pendant la dernière décade d’août, avec des maxima de 136/heure le 25.

  • Labbes

Labbe à longue queue (Long-tailed Skua): au moins 478 individus! Le passage débute soudainement le 10/8 – jour d’observation des premiers labbes – avec au moins neuf en 1h30, suivis le lendemain par un bel effectif de 70 oiseaux en 2h40 de suivi et quasiment tous les jours par quelques-uns ou quelques dizaines de migrateurs jusqu’au 22/8. Ensuite rien pendant quatre jours, puis reprise modeste tout à la fin du mois pour culminer le 2/9 avec un effectif impressionant de 217 individus en 1h15 de suivi. Sauf erreur c’est un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal, établi en à peine une heure d’observation: combien sont passés en tout ce jour-la? Sans doute plus d’un millier… Cette espèce est bien connue pour ses fluctuations d’effectifs d’année en année: sur les sites de nidification en fonction de l’abondance de nourriture, et visiblement sur les sites d’observation côtiers comme Ngor en fonction des vents pouvant pousser les migrateurs plus près des rivages. En 2017, je n’avais eu que 126 individus; même en prenant en compte l’absence de suivi à la mi-août et pendant plusieurs jours en septembre, il est clair que c’était une “petite” année à Labbes à longue queue, contrairement à 2018.

 

 
Labbe parasite (Arctic Skua): 266 individus au compteur, auxquels il convient d’ajouter sans doute une bonne partie des 82 labbes “sp.”; Seuls six Labbes pomarins (Pomarine Skua) pour le moment, avec le premier certain le 30/8.

Labbe de McCormick (South Polar Skua): un oiseau typique passe assez près du bord le 20/9.

 

Pendant les trois mois qui restent pour cette saison 2018 j’aurai un peu moins de temps que l’an dernier pour suivre ce spectacle de la migration: avis aux amateurs qui souhaiteraient venir en renforts!

Puis il faudrait que je trouve le temps de vous parler de nos sorties récentes au lac Tanma, à la lagune de Yène, et le lac Rose… Mais avant toute chose, demain matin on a prévu une sortie en mer au large de Ngor! Compte-rendu et photos à suivre, si tout va bien.

L’association APALIS et l’atlas des oiseaux de Casamance

 

Bruno Bargain nous présente l’association APALIS et leur travail remarquable d’inventaire et de cartographie des oiseaux de Casamance.

 

L’association APALIS a vu le jour courant 2016 avec pour objet principal de soutenir et relayer les activités du GEPOC, l’association-sœur en Casamance, qui a pour vocation d’étudier et de conserver les oiseaux de cette région ainsi que les milieux dont ils dépendent et plus généralement à valoriser son patrimoine ornithologique.

Ce n’est qu’en 2017 qu’APALIS a réellement pris son essor, avec la mise en ligne de son site internet « Oiseaux de Casamance » qui a commencé à la faire connaître (site bilingue français-anglais).

SiteOiseauxCasamance

 

Depuis lors, nous avons cherché à améliorer cet outil pour le rendre plus attractif et en particulier pour restituer rapidement les observations faites sur le terrain via les cartes de répartition par espèce ou par maille. Il manque encore un module qui permettra à tout observateur la saisie en ligne de ses données, mais d’ores et déjà ce site a permis d’enregistrer de nouvelles adhésions et a commencé à susciter des rencontres fructueuses en Casamance d’ornithologues amateurs et professionnels au-delà du cercle restreint initial.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bateleur femelle adulte (J-P Thelliez)

 

L’avifaune de Casamance est riche d’au moins 531 espèces :

  • 318 s’y reproduisent potentiellement, la plupart sont sédentaires, d’autres effectuent des déplacements au sein de la zone tropicale ;
  • plus de 115 migrent depuis la zone paléarctique vers la Casamance durant la période internuptiale ;
  • le reste concerne des espèces d’occurrence plus ou moins occasionnelle.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Long-crested Eagle / Aigle huppard (J-P Thelliez)

 

Cette belle diversité s’explique par la grande variété des habitats – dunes et plaines côtières, lagunes, cours d’eau, mangroves et marais, rizières et autres zones cultivées, savane arborée… et surtout, la présence de forêts guinéennes encore relativement bien conservées.

L’objectif prioritaire de notre association est, faut-il le rappeler, l’inventaire atlas des oiseaux de Casamance. Pour y arriver, il faut parcourir à différentes périodes de l’année, l’ensemble des 330 carrés 10×10 de la région, ce qui représente un travail colossal pour une poignée d’observateurs ! Durant l’année qui vient de s’écouler, plusieurs missions de quelques jours ont permis d’augmenter significativement le nombre de carrés prospectés. Par ailleurs, plusieurs ornithos africains et européens ont rejoint récemment notre petit groupe de départ, ce qui permet d’envisager une accélération de notre connaissance de l’avifaune régionale. La base de données d’APALIS compte actuellement plus de 20 000 lignes d’informations.

L’atlas est accessible directement à travers ce lien, ou bien depuis la page d’accueil du site Oiseaux de Casamance. La carte ci-dessous donne une idée du niveau de couverture actuel et de l’effort de prospection: la couleur de chaque carré représente le nombre d’observations, alors que le chiffre indique le nombre d’espèces trouvées dans la maille.

 

AtlasCasamance_MaillesNbEspeces

 

De plus, nous sommes conscients que nous devons aussi affiner les connaissances sur les périodes de reproduction des différentes espèces du territoire, les dates d’arrivée et de départ des migrateurs intra-africains et des migrateurs paléarctiques. Nous avons également démarré le dénombrement de quelques espèces coloniales (hérons, cormorans, spatules…) autour de Ziguinchor. Et nous avons en projet d’étendre ces comptages à toutes les colonies de la Basse Casamance en utilisant un drone (un dossier sera déposé dans les prochaines semaines à diverses fondations pour obtenir un financement). Un autre projet, en cours, consiste à inventorier les oiseaux de la partie casamançaise du Parc du Niokolo Koba durant un cycle annuel. Bref, le travail et les idées ne manquent pas !

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pied Hornbill / Calao longibande (J-P Thelliez)

AtlasCasamance_Calaobrevibande

Au Sénégal, le Calao longibande a une répartition restreinte à la Basse Casamance

 

Le poids d’une association et la qualité de ses actions dépendent du nombre et du dynamisme de ses membres. Nous vous invitons donc à nous rejoindre nombreux, via notre site internet. Votre contribution financière sera bien utile pour acquérir un minimum de matériel pédagogique. Et si vous avez l’opportunité de venir en Casamance, vos observations de terrain pourront être orientées et facilitées en prenant contact avec nous par mail avant votre séjour. Vos données viendront enrichir la base de données.

Une lettre électronique faisant état de la vie et des actions de l’association, de l’actualité ornithologique et de l’avancement de l’atlas est envoyée deux fois l’an à chaque adhérent.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Red-throated Bee-eater / Guêpier à gorge rouge (J-P Thelliez)

AtlasCasamance_Guepiergorgerouge

Le Guêpier à gorge rouge est un nicheur assez répandu en Moyenne et Haute Casamance

 

Si vous avez l’occasion de visiter la Casamance – peut-être que ce petit billet vous aura donné envie! – n’hésitez pas à prendre contact avec l’association avant votre voyage afin de voir s’il y a des especes particulieres à rechercher ou de savoir quelles zones à couverture encore insuffisante sont à cibler. Une manière de combiner l’utile à l’agréable et de contribuer à l’amélioration de notre connaissance des oiseaux du Sénégal. Et faites comme moi, adhérez à APALIS! – BP

 

YellowthroatedLongclaw_Diembering_20170307_IMG_0034

Yellow-throated Longclaw / Sentinelle à gorge jaune (BP)