Archive by Author | bram

Technopole – more gulls, breeding waders & more

It’s been a while since Technopole last featured here, mostly for a lack of birds… With water levels now extremely low – the main pond only has a few shallow patches of water left – and as a result bird numbers are very low. Just a few hundred Black-winged Stilts, and Spur-winged Lapwings, 100-200 Slender-billed Gulls, the odd Audouin’s and a few oversummering Black-headed Gulls, a few lone waders here and there, 6-8 Greater Flamingos and that’s about it. Luckily there’s always something to see at Technopole, and even if overall numbers of migrants are low at the moment, there’s always some of the local species for which it’s now breeding season!

But more about the gulls first.

One of the previous winter’s Mediterranean Gulls remained up to 10 June at least but only allowed for a few poor records shots, rather unusually a 2nd summer (rather than 1st summer) bird. Apparently the first June record for Senegal, of what in the past 10-20 years has become a regular winter visitor in small numbers to the Dakar region. The last Yellow-legged Gull (Goéland leucophée) was seen on 2 May, also a rather late date.

MediterraneanGull_Technopole_20190501_IMG_3400)

Mediterranean Gull / Mouette mélanocéphale

MediterraneanGull_Technopole_20190501_IMG_3392

Mediterranean Gull / Mouette mélanocéphale

 

Actually I just realised that I hadn’t shared some of the better pictures of the star bird of the spring here: the 2nd c.y. Laughing Gull, which ended up staying from 25 April until 22 May at least. With the exception of the adult bird this spring (which was seen only twice by two lucky Iberian observers 🙂 on 21-23 April), all previous records were one-day-wonders.

LaughingGull_Technopole_20190430_IMG_3266 (2)

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille 2 c.y. (BP)

LaughingGull_Technopole_20190430_IMG_3347

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille 2 c.y. (BP)

 

And while we’re at it, here’s the stunning adult Franklin’s Gull in breeding plumage, which unfortunately didn’t linger and was seen just once, on 30 April, at fairly long range hence the hazy pictures:

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190430_IMG_3324

Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin ad. (BP)

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190430_IMG_3356

Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin ad. (BP)

 

This bird is from the following day, probably the 2nd summer seen several times between 13 April and 2 May:

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190501_IMG_3367

Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin, 3 c.y.? (BP)

 

Several Black-winged Stilts are still on the nest, but breeding success appears to be low (because water levels are too low, making the nests more vulnerable?). Only a handful of little stiltlets are seen on each visit, and hardly any older juvs. are around. Wondering whether those at Lac Rose may be more successful this year…

BlackwingedStilt_Technopole_20190211_IMG_2375

Black-winged Stilt / Echasse blanche

 

A welcome surprise though was a tiny Kittlitz’s Plover chick (Gravelot pâtre), barely a few days old, seen on 10 June. Previous breeding records here were in June 2016 (probable) and July 2012.

Greater Painted-Snipe (Rhynchée peinte) may also be breeding as a pair was seen on 23 June and a male two weeks earlier in the same area (past golf club house on edge of lake near the small baobab!).

And this year there are quite a few Little Bitterns around, quite obviously more than in previous years, with sightings including several singing birds and pairs in at least five locations. I guess the number of territories all over the Grande Niaye de Pikine could easily exceed 10-12 pairs/singing males. Here’s a rather poor picture of a pair seen on our most recent visit, just before it flew off:

LittlleBittern_Technopole_20190623_IMG_4226

Little Bittern / Blongios nain

 

Little Grebe (Grèbe castagneux) was once again confirmed to be breeding, though later than in previous years: an adult with a still downy juv. (aged 1-2 weeks?) was on the small pond past the golf course on 10 June, in the same site as in previous years. Previous  records in central and northern Senegal were during Dec. – April (read up more about the breeding status of Little Grebe in Senegal & Gambia in this paper that we published in Malimbus last year)

Another nice surprise last Sunday (23/6) was the first Diederik Cuckoo (Coucou didric) of the season in these parts of the country: a singing bird flew high over the pond coming from the Pikine side, then was heard again later on in the tree belt near the football field. Almost as good as hearing the first Common Cuckoo in early April, back “home” in Geneva!

We’re almost there! In the end, there’s been quite a lot to catch up on since early May…

This colour-ringed Gull-billed Tern which I think I’ve mentioned before is indeed from the small colony of Neufelderkoog in northern Germany – the only site where the species breeds north of the Mediterranean region – and as it turns out it’s only the second-ever resighting of one of their birds in Africa. The first was that of a first-winter bird seen in February 2017 in Conakry, Guinea. Our bird ended up staying at least 16 days, from 13 – 28 April. It was ringed on 18 July 2017 by Markus Risch (“WRYY”: white-red/yellow-yellow) and was a late or replacement brood, and the bird was among the latest fledglings of all.

GullbilledTern_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2737

Gull-billed Tern / Sterne hansel

170718_DSC_0311_WRYY

Same bird, almost 2 years earlier! (M. Risch)

 

This Common Ringed Plover was around for some time in April / early May, ringed in Norway (details yet to be submitted).

CommonRingedPlover_Technopole_20190430_IMG_3337

Common Ringed Plover / Grand Gravelot

 

Also on the ringing front, we’re still waiting to hear back for some of the 40-50 Sandwich Tern ring readings Miguel and I managed to make this spring. One of the most recent birds, seen on May 1st, was ringed in June 2017 at Hodbarrow RSPB reserve in Cumbria (UK), and was already spotted on 25/11/17 at Kartong in Gambia (4,720 km, 148 days). While 2nd c.y. birds all stay in Africa during their first summer, third calendar-years such as this one may already migrate back to Europe. 

Rounding off the overview with the most recent addition to the Technopole list: African Wattled Lapwing (Vanneau du Sénégal), which surprisingly had not been seen so far, at least not as far as I know – seems like the species actively avoids dense urban areas, since they are regular just outside Dakar but obviously a bit of a vagrant here in town. One was seen flying past, calling a few times, on 10 June.

Species number 239!

Let’s see if we can manage to find 240 in the next few weeks.

 

 

Advertisements

Virée en Casamance: Kolda et Kafountine

Une récente visite de terrain pour le projet d’assainissement que mon ONG met en œuvre en Casamance a été l’occasion de faire un peu d’ornitho, au gré des déplacements dans les villages et du temps libre le matin et le soir autour des hôtels. Et bien sûr j’ai également noté plus ou moins méticuleusement les rapaces, rolliers et autres calaos le long des trajets en voiture, contribuant ainsi, certes de manière modeste, aux travaux d’atlas de Casamance dont on a déjà parlé à plusieurs reprises ici.

Tout d’abord de Ziguinchor à Kolda, avec escale dans la commune de Samine, puis deux nuits passées à l’hôtel Le Firdou que nous avions déjà visité en mai 2017, m’ont permis de retrouver des espèces bien sympathiques que je ne vois pas à Dakar, telles le Guêpier à gorge rouge, le Martin-chasseur géant ou encore le Grébifoulque (Red-throated Bee-eater, Giant Kingfisher, African Finfoot). Déjà vue en 2017 ici, une femelle de cette dernière espèce est vue à chaque fois, sauf le dernier matin lorsque c’est un mâle adulte qui se nourrit dans la Casamance, qui en cette fin de saison sèche n’est plus qu’un ruisseau ici. L’une des techniques de la femelle consistait à méthodiquement secouer des feuilles de nénuphars et autres débris végétaux avec le bec, visiblement afin de déranger les insectes pour aussitôt les picorer. (pour un peu plus d’infos sur le régime alimentaire de cet oiseau remarquable, voir notre note brève dans Malimbus sur l’observation d’un Grébifoulque se nourrissant sur le dos d’un hippopotame, l’an dernier à Wassadou)

 

AfricanFinfoot_Kolda_20190515_IMG_4003

AfricanFinfoot_Kolda_20190515_IMG_4004

African Finfoot / Grébifoulque

 

Toujours au bord de la rivière, quelques espèces moins attendues sont observées, notamment ce mâle de Blongios nain qui pourrait bien nicher sur place (les tons châtains du cou et de la poitrine indiquent qu’il s’agit de la sous-espèce africaine payesii et non d’un hivernant européen attardé).

LittleBittern_Kolda_20190516_IMG_4029

Little Bittern / Blongios nain

 

Ou encore cette Talève d’Allen, autre espèce paludicole peu connue en Casamance et dont les observations récentes se comptent sur les doigts d’une main.

AllensGallinule_Kolda_20190516_IMG_4016

Allen’s Gallinule / Talève d’Allen

 

Parmi les autres oiseaux vus au Firdou, citons encore le Palmiste africain, le Faucon ardoisé (couple avec comportement suggérant la présence d’un nid), le Grand Indicateur, l’Apalis à gorge jaune (première mention en Moyenne-Casamance semble-t-il), les Astrilds à queue de vinaigre et à joues orange, et cerise sur le gâteau ce couple de Gangas quadribandes qui viennent boire chaque soir au bord de la Casamance sur la rive juste en face de la terrasse, et dont j’ai même pu enregistrer les cris étonnants. (Palm-nut Vulture, Grey Kestrel, Greater Honeyguide, Yellow-breasted Apalis, Lavender & Orange-cheeked Waxbills, Four-banded Sandgrouse). Liste complète ici.

GreyKestrel_Kolda_20190515_IMG_3938

Grey Kestrel / Faucon ardoisé

GreaterHoneyguide_Kolda_20190515_IMG_3956

Greater Honeyguide / Grand Indicateur

 

Peu d’oiseaux sont vus lors du long trajet de Kolda à Kafountine, avec escales à Sédhiou et Marsassoum pour visiter des ménages et rencontrer nos maçons et équipes locales; même les Vautours charognards étaient relativement peu nombreux !  Arrivés à Kafountine, on s’installe à l’excellent Esperanto Lodge pour trois nuits. Situé au bord de la lagune à deux pas de la plage, bien au calme quelques km au nord du village, c’est un vrai petit paradis et une base idéale pour explorer la brousse aux alentours. De plus, l’accueil y est bien chaleureux, les repas sont délicieux, et les chambres sont tout à fait agréables. Sans parler des hamacs accrochés aux palmiers dans le jardin luxuriant. Autant dire que je vous le recommande vivement ! Un séjour de de 3 ou 4 jours devrait permettre de bien explorer la zone et d’organiser des visites à la réserve ornithologique de Kalissaye ou à la héronnière de Kassel située au sud de Kafountine. Le patron Eric se fera un plaisir d’organiser les sorties. Dans le coin bibliothèque à côté du bar, une vieille copie du Serle & Morel – premier guide ornitho « moderne » pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest – avec les coches locales témoigne de l’intérêt qu’on porte ici à la nature et en particulier aux oiseaux !! Pour ma part, en quelques sorties matinales et crépusculaires j’ai pu observer 122 espèces d’oiseaux aux environs immédiats du lodge, c’est dire le potentiel de la zone.

Parmi les plus remarquables, citons les Touracos vert et violet, le Calao siffleur, le Guêpier à queue d’aronde, les Pics tacheté et cardinal, les Cisticoles siffleuses et chanteuses, l’Euplecte monseigneur, Noircaps loriots, les Gladiateurs soufré et de Blanchot, plusieurs Gobemouches drongo, Echenilleur à épaulettes rouges, des Hirondelles fanti et ainsi de suite (Guinea & Violet Turacos; Piping Hornbill, Swallow-tailed Bee-eater; Buff-spotted & Cardinal Woodpeckers; Whistling & Singing Cisticolas; Black-winged Bishop, Oriole Warbler, Grey-headed & Orange-breasted Bush-Shrikes; Northern Black Flycatcher, Fanti Saw-wing). Egalement les deux espèces de Tchitrec dont un male qui pourrait bien être un hybride mais malheureusement pas de photo… (African & Red-bellied Paradise-Flycatchers, incl. a possible hybrid)

CardinalWoodpecker_Kafountine_20190519_IMG_4122

Cardinal Woodpecker / Pic cardinal

BlackwingedBishop_Kafountine_20190519_IMG_4113

Black-winged Bishop / Euplecte monseigneur

 

Les Spréos améthystes, migrateurs intra-africains fraichement arrives dans la région, étaient particulièrement actifs, avec plusieurs males chanteurs mais toujours un peu loin pour des photos correctes – celle ci-dessous ne rend pas du tout le plumage éclatant de ce joli étourneau!

VioletbackedStarling_Kafountine_20190519_IMG_4131

Violet-backed Starling / Spréo améthystes

 

Côté hivernants, il ne reste plus que quelques limicoles dans le « lac » quasiment à sec, puis 2-3 Balbuzards sans doute estivants, et des Martinets noirs passant en petit nombre le long de la côte (Osprey, Common Swift). De manière plus étonnante peut-être, j’observe plusieurs Fauvettes des jardins à deux endroits dans les buissons près du lodge, sans doute au moins quatre individus différents témoignant d’un passage toujours en cours en cette deuxième décade de mai (Garden Warbler).

Nous bouclons notre boucle à Ziguinchor, non sans avoir fait une brève escapade à la forêt de Djibelor. Toujours pas réussi à voir ces fameux Gonoleks de Turati (juste entendu, comme la dernière fois…), mais nous levons un Turnix d’Andalousie dans la zone où Bruno a pu attester la nidification il y a quelques mois, et on entend très nettement le chant caractéristique du Malcoha à bec jaune, espèce très localisée au Sénégal et que je n’avais pas encore vu ici (Turati’s Boubou, Common Buttonquail, Blue Malkoha).

Si tout va bien je retournerai bientôt en Casamance, cette fois pour continuer la recherche d’espèces forestières dans la région d’Oussouye et pourquoi pas pour tenter de retrouver les Anomalospizes. Bruno a encore tout récemment trouvé un Engoulevent à épaulettes noires, Coucals à ventre blanc, l’Alèthe à huppe rousse, l’Akalat brun et j’en passe (Black-shouldered Nightjar, Black-throated Coucal, White-tailed Alethe, Brown Akalat). Et me signale que le Jabiru est toujours présent vers la héronnière de Kassel, tout comme quatre Cigognes épiscopales! (Saddlebill, Woolly-necked Stork)

 

WhitecrownedRobinChat_Kolda_20190515_IMG_3960

White-crowned Robin-Chat / Cossyphe à tête blanche

 

 

Quest for a Ghost

A day off and not much going on at Technopole recently (water levels are too low, most migrants have moved on) means that I finally have some time to write up this long overdue post. At long last I managed to “catch up” as they say on a very special bird, part quail, part plover – or is it half lark, a quarter courser and a quarter chameleon? Either way, our third attempt to find the unique Quail-Plover (Turnix à ailes blanches) finally paid off with some superb sightings of two different birds, nearly three weeks ago somewhere south of Touba/Mbacke in central Senegal’s barren bush country. I’m pretty sure that this diminutive bird, which of course is neither a plover, nor a quail or lark (let alone a chameleon), easily ranks in the top 10 of most wanted birds to be found in Senegal. Secretive yet not shy, it’s notoriously hard to find in the vast expanse of suitable habitat throughout central Senegal. and earlier attempts back in February and June 2018 failed to turn up any Quail-Plovers.

So, we set off ridiculously early (well maybe not for most birders, but for me 5.30am is VERY early) one Saturday morning and took the shiny new highway to Touba (merci la cooperation chinoise, Senegal now has an additional 1 billion or so Euros in debts to reimburse). Within no time we reached Touba and zoomed through the usually very busy town of Mbacke, all being quiet as it’s Ramadan season here. A few kilometres past the surprisingly clean town of Tip, for Senegalese standards that is, we took what looked like a more or less driveable track heading in the direction of a known spot for Quail-Plover. I somehow managed to get a pretty impressive puncture thanks to a sharp piece of bone (I’m guessing a goat’s femur, see below: opinions welcome), but by 8.30 we were out in the field, birding with a purpose.

QuailPloverPuncture

 

Endlessly kicking bushes and slaloming one’s way through the bush country seems to be the only way to nail down this ghost bird. Preferably in a large group, definitely not on your own or with just one mate…

TipLandscape_20190511_IMG_3647

Quail-Plover country

 

Not really sure whether we really stood any chance, and hopes slowly diminishing as we kicked along without much of a result for about an hour, Miguel finally started frantically gesturing some distance away. Sure enough, he’d found one!

A short sprint later I finally saw what must be one of the most unique birds I’ve ever seen:

QuailPlover_Tip_20190511_IMG_3649

YES!!

QuailPlover_Tip_20190511_IMG_3708

Quail-Plover / Turnix à ailes blanches

 

We ended up watching this bird for at least half an hour as it slowly moved from one bush to another, typically rocking back-and-forth just like a chameleon, at times feeding but always keeping a watchful eye on us. We finally moved on, both of us all ecstatic of course, like two boys who just received their most wanted Christmas present. Barely five minutes later, I flushed a second bird, which again was very cooperative and allowed for great views from close-up, though it seemed more alert and more shy than the first bird, presumably its partner.

QuailPlover_Tip_20190511_IMG_3734

Second bird

 

A typical Sahel species, the “Lark Buttonquail” is indeed most closely related to the buttonquails (Turnicidae), hence its French name. It was first described in 1819 by Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot based on a specimen from Senegal; its distribution runs from here and southern Mauritania in a fairly narrow belt throughout the Sahel all the way to Sudan, with what seems like a disjunct population in southern Ethiopia and arid country in Kenya.

QuailPlover_Tip_20190511_IMG_3762

Bird & Man

 

To give a sense of how little is known about the species, here are some excerpts from the HBW Alive species page:

  • Voice: Apparently silent when flushed; otherwise a very soft, low whistle given from ground has been described, but context seems unknown.
  • Food and feeding: little specific information […] at least partly nocturnal […]
  • Breeding: Little known […] possibly monogamous […]
  • Movements: Poorly understood […]
  • Status and conservation: Not globally threatened. Uncommon to locally common […] in Senegal, may have become less common since 1930s […] Perhaps only a vagrant to Gambia (three recent records) […]

Our observations don’t add much to the above; we did see one of the birds feeding as it was walking slowly and every now and then quickly pecking either small insects (ants?) or seeds or other vegetable matter from the ground. When initially flushed, both birds silently flew a short distance (10-15 meters for the first, maybe 30 m for the second bird) and immediately took cover at the base of a bush. Interestingly, we found these birds in exactly the same spot as where it was reported back in January, suggesting it is present here and highly site faithful at least throughout the dry season.

Most recent observations in Senegal are made by tour groups on their regular circuit, who usually dedicate a stop (or two or three, depending on success rates!) between the north and the Saloum delta or Wassadou to their quest for the Quail-Plover. Abdou ‘Carlos’ Lo almost certainly has seen the most of these birds in the last few years, and has found the species in several spots now, so thanks certainly must go to Carlos here. There are also a few recent records from near Toubacouta, from Palmarin and from the Trois-Marigots reserve (see this post by Ornithondar, with as always a good summary of the status of not only Quail-Plover, but also its relative the Common Buttonquail). Morel & Morel mainly recorded the species around Richard-Toll, while Sauvage & Rodwell mention records from the late 80s and early 90s from Popenguine, Mbour (ORSTOM field station), the Niokolo-Koba NP, and Kaffrine. 

Here’s the second bird again, showing much less white in the wing and a very crisp plumage:

QuailPlover_Tip_20190511_IMG_3754

Quail-Plover / Turnix à ailes blanches

 

Of course, there are other birds to be seen here, even if diversity is pretty low especially at this time of the year, with most migrants gone and wet season visitors not arrived yet. Savile’s Bustard, Singing Bush Lark, Yellow-bellied Eremomela, and Desert Cisticola are the most notable other inhabitants of this region (Outarde de Savile, Alouette chanteuse, Erémomèle à croupion jaune, Cisticole du désert). A single Melodious Warbler (Hypolaïs polyglotte) was the only Palearctic migrant still around. See complete eBird checklists here and here.

DesertCisticola_Tip_20190511_IMG_3783

Desert Cisticola / Cisticole du désert

SingingBushLark_Tip_20190511_IMG_3772

A silent Singing Bush Lark / Alouette chanteuse

ChestnutbelliedStarling_Tip_20190511_IMG_3698

Chestnut-bellied Starling / Choucador à ventre roux

Lizard-Latastialongicaudata_Tip_20190511_IMG_3715

Long-tailed Lizard  / Lézard à longue queue

 

Third time lucky, as they say.

 

 

Two Laughing Gulls, and other unexpected birds at Technopôle

Another visitor from North America showed up recently at Technopole: a superb adult Laughing Gull (Mouette atricille) was found by Miguel Lecoq and Ignacio Morales over the Easter weekend. First seen on 21.4, it was still present two days later when it was also heard calling. Amazingly, later that same week (25.4), Miguel found an immature (2nd year) in the same place!

Larus_atricilla_Ignacio_Morales_1_crop

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille (I. Morales)

 

Identification is pretty straightforward, the main field characters being nicely visible here: dark grey mantle, almost entirely black outer primaries, narrow white trailing edge to secondaries and tertials, back hood with white “eye lashes”, fairly long dark crimson red bill, and rather long dark red to blackish legs. The young bird is also very distinct and is relatively easy to pick out amongst the numerous other gulls that are present at Technopole at the moment: Slender-billed Gulls mostly, but also Grey-headed Gulls (the immatures of which superficially resemble Laughing Gull), and still some Black-headed, Audouin’s and Lesser Black-backed Gulls (Goeland railler, Mouettes à tête grise et rieuse, Goelands d’Audouin et brun).

Proper rare bird record shot:

Larus_atricilla_MiguelLecoq_IMG-20190425-WA0001_crop

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille (M. Lecoq)

 

This is the fourth American species to be seen in Senegal in less than two weeks, once again highlighting the potential of the country to find vagrant gulls and waders: the overwintering Lesser Yellowlegs (Chevalier à pattes jaunes) was last seen on 8.4, followed by a 2nd year Franklin’s Gull (Mouette de Franklin) on 13.4, the American Golden Plover (Pluvier bronzé) from Palmarin (15.4), and now Larus atricilla. And this is by just a small handful of active observers… just imagine what else there is to be found, if only there were more birders here.

There are just five previous records of Laughing Gull:

  • An adult in the Saloum delta on 18.3.85 (Dupuy, A.R. (1985) Sur la présence au Sénégal de Larus atricilla. Alauda 53. Two years earlier, a possible sighting in the same place of a bird apparently paired with Grey-headed Gull, could not be confirmed and should thus be ignored.
  • An adult at Guembeul (near Saint-Louis) on 12.1.95 (Yésou P., Triplet P. (1995) La mouette atricille Larus atricilla au Sénégal. Alauda 63)
  • A 2nd winter in the Saloum delta on 28.12.05, see picture below (A. Flitti; Recent Reports, Bull. Afr. Bird Club 13)
  • One flying past the Ngor seawatch site on 7.10.08 (P. Crouzier, P. J. Dubois, J.-Y. Fremont, E. Rousseau, A. Verneau; Recent Reports, Bull. Afr. Bird Club 16)
  • An adult at Saint Louis on 10.1.14; a 2nd winter possibly also present (M. Beevers; Recent Reports, Bull. Afr. Bird Club 21)

 

8122 Mouette atricille_Siné Saloum - AmineFlitti (small)

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille, Saloum, Dec. 2005 (A. Flitti)

 

Elsewhere on the continent, there are records from Morocco, Mauritania, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau (first records is yet to be published), and possibly elsewhere – most recently, an imm. photographed at the Bijol Islands in Gambia in December 2018. It’s an annual vagrant to western Europe, even in unexpected locations such as on this lake in the Swiss Alps where an adult overwintered in 2005/2006:

Larusatricilla_Merligen_20051226_Piot

Laughing Gull / Mouette atricille, Merligen, Dec. 2006 (B. Piot)

 

Unlike Franklin’s Gull, which has been recorded in all months except for November, with most records in May, July and August, Laughing Gull is obviously a species that is more to be expected in winter, with all records so far occurring between October and April.

Other good birds found during Miguel’s frequent visits these past few days include two other additions to the Technopole list: Golden Oriole on 25.4 (Loriot d’Europe), and Pallid Swift on 23.4 (Martinet pâle). A late Mediterranean Gull (Mouette mélanocéphale) was also a good record, as was the count of 606 Sanderlings.

 

The site list now stands at 237 species. Which one will be next?

 

Update!

I wrote the preceding paragraphs yesterday, and since then I’ve been – at long last – back to Technopole, as I was up north last weekend and travelling abroad for work this past week. Well, we got the answer: species number 238 is Plain Martin (also known as Brown-throated Martin; Hirondelle paludicole). We had a single bird feeding over the water – often at close range – along with a couple of Barn Swallows (Hirondelle rustique) and several Little Swifts (Martinet des maisons), nicely showing its features. This is a rarely reported species from Senegal, and as it turns out the first eBird observation for the country! It’s rather patchily distributed throughout West Africa, being more common in Morocco, East Africa, and Southern Africa. Considered a non-breeding visitor to Senegal and Gambia, I could only find six old records from Senegal: Morel & Morel list four, followed by one in Jan. 1992 in the Djoudj and one from Mekhe in August 1992. Last year, Bruno Bargain found several at Kambounda (Sédhiou, Casamance), on 2.12.18, but other than those there do not seem to be any recent observations. Very nice sighting and an unexpected addition to my Senegal list – and a cool lifer for Miguel!

Alas no Laughing Gull this morning, but we did see the Frankin’s Gull again. Also another Pallid Swift, as well as new sightings of a colour-ringed German Gull-billed Tern (Sterne hansel) and a Norwegian Common Ringed Plover (Grand Gravelot), plus now two different Med’ Gulls. Let’s try again on Wednesday morning, who knows maybe the gull will be back. It may actually have been around for a few weeks now, as there was a possible sighting at Technopole on March 30th. It’s quite possible that the adult is hanging out by the harbour or elsewhere in the baie de Hann or even Rufisque, and will show up again at Technopole.

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190428_IMG_3237

Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin (BP)

 

 

 

Trois-Marigots: Gallinule Galore

A recent early morning visit to the Trois-Marigots area, just outside Saint Louis in the lower Senegal delta, quickly turned into a proper gallinule fest, with dozens – hundreds probably! – of rallidaeMoorhens, African Swamphens, Black Crakes, and even a few of the much hoped for Allen’s Gallinule. No crakes this time round, but all in all a pretty spectacular sight in a great setting. Below are a few images taken during our visit, all but the last one taken from the Tylla digue which crosses the second of the the Trois-Marigots. Vieux and I mainly birded a stretch of just a few hundred meters for the first couple of hours, with new birds showing up all the time.

With habitat like this, what would you expect?

TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2951

Trois-Marigots at Tylla

 

Rails of course, but also African Pygmy-Goose, Purple Heron, Black HeronLittle Bittern, African Fish-Eagle, Marsh Harrier, various Acrocephalus warblers, Winding CisticolaZebra Waxbill, and so on.

AfricanSwamphen_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2935

African Swamphen / Talève d’Afrique

BlackCrake_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2949

Black Crake / Râle à bec jaune

BlackCrake_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2963

Black Crake / Râle à bec jaune

BlackCrake_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2962

Black Crake / Râle à bec jaune juv.

Moorhen_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2944

Common Moorhen / Gallinule poule-d’eau

 

Allen’s Gallinule is pretty local in Senegal, being most regularly reported from Djoudj and from Trois-Marigots, though it also occurs in Casamance and probably elsewhere (still waiting for it to show up one day at Technopole!). We saw at least two adults, including one with a bright blue frontal shield. The second bird, pictured below, was somewhat duller but the obvious red eye indicates that it is also in breeding plumage, making it likely that the species breeds here at Trois-Marigots.

AllensGallinule_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2981

Allen’s Gallinule / Taleve d’Allen

 

And here’s that obligatory Pygmy-Goose picture, which I have to say I was quite pleased with:

AfricanPygmyGoose_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2995

African Pygmy-Goose / Anserelle naine

 

This one a bit less so, but nevertheless, always great to get a reasonable picture of a nervous warbler that just would not sit still… While most wintering warblers are long gone by now, there were still quite a few of these Sedge Warblers around, plus several Eurasian Reed Warblers, two Willow Warblers, and just one Bonelli’s Warbler. For the most part these are probably birds from the northern part of their breeding range.

SedgeWarbler_TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2976

Sedge Warbler / Phragmite des joncs

TroisMarigots_20190420_IMG_2938

 

Complete eBird checklist here, plus this one from the now bone-dry savanna between the first (also dry by now) and second marigots: Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse, Temminck’s Courser, Cut-throat, Pygmy Sunbird, etc. For more on Trois-Marigots and its crakes – including the rarely seen Little Crake – see this post, and of course many other notes by Frederic Bacuez on Ornithondar.

A brief visit to the Lampsar near Makhana village, on the opposite side of the route nationale, paid off with quite a few additional species such as fly-over Glossy Ibises, Collared Pratincoles, several waders including two Little Ringed Plovers, and most notably a small colony of Black-winged Stilts, with at least four birds incubating. There were probably several more, given that some of the nests were relatively well concealed as can be seen on the picture below. Checklist here.

BlackwingedStilt_Lampsar_20190420_IMG_3023

Black-winged Stilt / Echasse blanche

Mbarigot-Lampsar_20190420_IMG_3024

 

Staying on our swamp theme, here are a few more pictures from the Easter weekend which we spent at Zebrabar at the Langue de Barbarie national park. The Saint Louis STEP (sewage farm) was even more smelly than usual, but as always held some good birds such as this River Prinia and Greater Painted Snipe, two species that were also encountered at Trois-Marigots.

RiverPrinia_STEP-SaintLouis_20190422_IMG_3187

River Prinia / Prinia aquatique

GreaterPaintedSnipe_STEP-SaintLouis_20190422_IMG_3163

Greater Painted Snipe & Wood Sandpiper / Rhynchée peinte & Chevalier sylvain

 

Finally, I should mention that Vieux recently found Senegal’s 6th or 7th Lesser Jacana, more precisely at the Lampsar lodge on March 16th. He’d found the previous one just last summer during a waterbird count near Ross Bethio on July 15th. The species is probably a fairly regular yet scarce visitor to Senegal, but its precise status is yet to be defined. Once again Vieux shows that he’s one of the most skilled – and most active – birders in the country!

LesserJacana_Lampsar_20190316_VieuxNgom

Lesser Jacana / Jacana nain, Lampsar, March 2019 (V. Ngom)

 

 

 

 

American Golden Plover at Palmarin

Quick post to report yet another American vagrant, after the Franklin’s Gull from last Saturday and the Lesser Yellowlegs from just a week ago, both at Technopole.

This morning at Palmarin in the western Saloum delta, I found an American Golden Plover (Pluvier bronzé), likely a second year bird, feeding on the edge of a shallow lagoon together with a few other waders. It’s almost getting a bit of a standard spring sighting here in Senegal: this is the third consecutive year with records in April, and the species has been near-annual since 2012. Prior to this only three records were known, though it’s not clear whether this reflects a true increase in the number of “AGPs” that make it to West Africa or just a result of increased observer coverage – probably the latter. The Palmarin bird brings the total to 14 records involving at least 17 birds.

As can be seen in my hazy pictures below, the bird stood out mainly thanks to its very white supercilium extending behind the ear coverts, the dark smudge across the breast, and of course long wings extending well beyond the tail tip. As it flew a short distance, I could clearly see the greyish underwing.

More on the identification and on the occurrence of the species in Senegal in this post from last November and also here.

AmericanGoldenPlover_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2908

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

AmericanGoldenPlover_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2913

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

AmericanGoldenPlover_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2919

American Golden Plover / Pluvier bronzé

AmericanGoldenPlover_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2922

 

The same small lagoon just north of Ngalou village also held quite a few Slender-billed Gulls and several Caspian, Royal and Sandwich Terns (+ one Lesser Crested), six Avocets, three Black-tailed Godwits and a few other waders, though generally there aren’t loads of birds around at the moment (which is all relative of course: far out in the lagoons, there were hundreds of Little Stints and other small waders, just very far out… and at Diakhanor about a dozen Bar-tailed Godwits were seen).

Unlikely that anyone would go out to twitch the plover, but you never know so here’s a Google Maps link to the precise location where I saw the bird.

Besides the waders, a few remaining Lesser Black-backed and Audouin’s Gulls as well as two small groups of Barn Swallows, a couple of Yellow Wagtails and a few Western Olivaceous Warblers were the only other northern migrants still around.

Palmarin_20190414_IMG_2798

 

Below are a few pictures of other species seen during the 24 hours we spent at Palmarin.

BlackwingedKite_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2893

Black-winged Kite / Elanion blanc

 

BrucesGreenPigeon_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2881

Bruce’s Green Pigeon /  Colombar waalia

 

SlenderbilledGull_Palmarin_20190414_IMG_2838

Slender-billed Gull / Goéland railleur

 

YellowbilledOxpecker_Palmarin_20190415_IMG_2901

Spot the Yellow-billed Oxpecker hitching a ride (Piqueboeuf à bec jaune) (J. Piot)

 

Palmarin_20190414_IMG_2796

Unsuccessful attempt at reading a Caspian Tern with yellow ring (in any case a local bird) (J. Piot)

 

Let’s see if this spring any American Golden Plovers turn up at Technopole again…

 

 

The Great Re-Tern

April is Tern month!

From mid-March into May, lots of terns pass through Dakar on their way back home from the wintering grounds further south – some as far as South Africa! – and the first half of April is definitely peak time for many species. When conditions are right, literally thousands of these elegant birds may pass through on a single day, and sites such as Technopole can hold several hundreds of birds at any one time. So much that in the past week, I’ve had the chance to see 12 out of the 14 tern species that are known to occur in Senegal, the only ones missing being Bridled and the rare Sooty Tern.

On Monday 8.4 at Technopole, decent numbers of terns were about, mainly Sandwich Tern (+300, likely quite a bit more) with a supporting cast of the usual Caspian and Gull-billed Terns (the former with several recently emancipated juveniles, likely from the Saloum or Casamance colonies), but also several dozen African Royal Tern, a few Common Terns, at least two Lesser Crested, and as a bonus two fine adult Roseate Terns roosting among their cousins. And as I scanned one of the flocks one last time before returning back home, an adult Whiskered Tern in breeding plumage, already spotted the previous day by Miguel. I managed to read four ringed Sandwich Terns but far more were wearing rings, but were impossible to read.

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2765.JPG

Gulls & Terns at Technopole

 

Yesterday 13.4, we went back to our favourite urban hotspot mainly in order to see if we could read some more of these rings. The main roost is close to the northern shore of the main lagoon, quite close to golf club house, which makes it possible to get close enough to the birds to read most rings. We saw most of the same tern species (except Roseate), with the addition of a fine moulting White-winged Tern and a small flock of Little Terns migrating over our heads. The first colour-ringed bird we saw was actually a Gull-billed Tern, but not the usual Spanish bird (“U83”) ringed in 2009 and seen several times herein the past three winters. This bird was even more interesting, as it was ringed in the only remaining colony in northern Europe, more precisely in the German Wadden Sea. Awaiting details from the ringers, but it’s quite likely that there are very few (if any!) recoveries of these northern birds this far south. It may well be the same bird as one that we saw back in November 2018 at lac Mbeubeusse, though we didn’t manage to properly establish the ring combination at the time.

GullbilledTern_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2751

Colour-ringed Gull-billed Tern & Black-winged Stilts / Sterne hansel & Echasse blanche

 

So, back to our ring readings: all in all, we managed to decipher an impressive 14 Sandwich Tern rings – blue, white, yellow & red! – of birds originating from no less than four countries: Ireland, UK, Netherlands, and one from Italy (to be confirmed). Most of these are chicks that were born in summer 2016 and that logically spent their first two years in the Southern Hemisphere, and are now returning back to their breeding grounds for the first time. In addition, a Black-headed Gull with a blue ring proved to be a French bird ringed as a chick in a colony in the Forez region (west of Lyon) in 2018, while a Spanish Audouin’s Gull was a bird not previously read here. I’ll try to find some time to write up more on our ring recoveries, now that my little database has just over 500 entries!

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2778

More gulls & terns

 

Others local highlights from these past few days are the Lesser Yellowlegs still at Technopole on 8.4 (but not seen yesterday… maybe it has finally moved on), also a superb breeding plumaged Bar-tailed Godwit, still a few Avocets, plenty of Ruff, Little Stint, Sanderling, Curlew Sandpiper and Dunlin, many of which in full breeding attire. And on 13.4, once again a Franklin’s Gull, but also a rather late Mediterranean Gull and what was probably the regular adult Yellow-legged Gull seen several times since December. Three Spotted Redshanks were also noteworthy as this is not a regular species at Technopole. The Black-winged Stilts are breeding again, and the first two chicks – just a couple of days old – were seen yesterday, with at least two more birds on nests; a family of Moorhen was also a good breeding record.

Full eBird checklist from 13.4 here.

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2786

A sleepy Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin

 

Earlier this week at the Calao was just about as good in terms of tern diversity: again the usual Sandwich Terns which are passing through en masse at the moment, with some LCT’s in the mix, several dozen Common Terns and the odd Roseate Tern hurriedly yet graciously flying past the seawatch spot, and of course more Royal Terns en route to Langue de Barbarie or Mauritanian breeding sites, a lone Caspian Tern, and this time round an even less expected White-winged Tern (and just two Black Terns). Oh and also the first Arctic Tern of the season! The first birds in spring are typically seen at the end of March or first half of April; earliest dates (2015-2018) are 16.3.18 and 25.3.16. The numbers of migrating terns were really impressive here on Saturday 6.4: a rough estimate puts the number of Sandwich and Common Terns passing through at 500 and 1200, respectively, in just two hours.

At Ngor, regular morning sessions have yielded the usual Pomarine and Arctic Skuas, Northern Gannets, as well as a handful of Cape Verde Shearwaters feeding offshore on most days. Sooty Shearwaters passed through in good numbers on 6.4, while last Friday (12.4) was best for Sabine’s Gull: 73 birds in just one hour, so far my best spring count. Also several Long-tailed Skuas and the other day a South Polar or (more likely) a Great Skua was present, a rare spring sighting. All checklists for the recent Calao counts can be found on this eBird page.

 

CommonGreenshank_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2752

Greenshank & Black-winged Stilt / Chevalier aboyeur & Echasse blanche