Archive | Seawatching RSS for this section

The Great Re-Tern

April is Tern month!

From mid-March into May, lots of terns pass through Dakar on their way back home from the wintering grounds further south – some as far as South Africa! – and the first half of April is definitely peak time for many species. When conditions are right, literally thousands of these elegant birds may pass through on a single day, and sites such as Technopole can hold several hundreds of birds at any one time. So much that in the past week, I’ve had the chance to see 12 out of the 14 tern species that are known to occur in Senegal, the only ones missing being Bridled and the rare Sooty Tern.

On Monday 8.4 at Technopole, decent numbers of terns were about, mainly Sandwich Tern (+300, likely quite a bit more) with a supporting cast of the usual Caspian and Gull-billed Terns (the former with several recently emancipated juveniles, likely from the Saloum or Casamance colonies), but also several dozen African Royal Tern, a few Common Terns, at least two Lesser Crested, and as a bonus two fine adult Roseate Terns roosting among their cousins. And as I scanned one of the flocks one last time before returning back home, an adult Whiskered Tern in breeding plumage, already spotted the previous day by Miguel. I managed to read four ringed Sandwich Terns but far more were wearing rings, but were impossible to read.

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2765.JPG

Gulls & Terns at Technopole

 

Yesterday 13.4, we went back to our favourite urban hotspot mainly in order to see if we could read some more of these rings. The main roost is close to the northern shore of the main lagoon, quite close to golf club house, which makes it possible to get close enough to the birds to read most rings. We saw most of the same tern species (except Roseate), with the addition of a fine moulting White-winged Tern and a small flock of Little Terns migrating over our heads. The first colour-ringed bird we saw was actually a Gull-billed Tern, but not the usual Spanish bird (“U83”) ringed in 2009 and seen several times herein the past three winters. This bird was even more interesting, as it was ringed in the only remaining colony in northern Europe, more precisely in the German Wadden Sea. Awaiting details from the ringers, but it’s quite likely that there are very few (if any!) recoveries of these northern birds this far south. It may well be the same bird as one that we saw back in November 2018 at lac Mbeubeusse, though we didn’t manage to properly establish the ring combination at the time.

GullbilledTern_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2751

Colour-ringed Gull-billed Tern & Black-winged Stilts / Sterne hansel & Echasse blanche

 

So, back to our ring readings: all in all, we managed to decipher an impressive 14 Sandwich Tern rings – blue, white, yellow & red! – of birds originating from no less than four countries: Ireland, UK, Netherlands, and one from Italy (to be confirmed). Most of these are chicks that were born in summer 2016 and that logically spent their first two years in the Southern Hemisphere, and are now returning back to their breeding grounds for the first time. In addition, a Black-headed Gull with a blue ring proved to be a French bird ringed as a chick in a colony in the Forez region (west of Lyon) in 2018, while a Spanish Audouin’s Gull was a bird not previously read here. I’ll try to find some time to write up more on our ring recoveries, now that my little database has just over 500 entries!

Gulls-Terns_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2778

More gulls & terns

 

Others local highlights from these past few days are the Lesser Yellowlegs still at Technopole on 8.4 (but not seen yesterday… maybe it has finally moved on), also a superb breeding plumaged Bar-tailed Godwit, still a few Avocets, plenty of Ruff, Little Stint, Sanderling, Curlew Sandpiper and Dunlin, many of which in full breeding attire. And on 13.4, once again a Franklin’s Gull, but also a rather late Mediterranean Gull and what was probably the regular adult Yellow-legged Gull seen several times since December. Three Spotted Redshanks were also noteworthy as this is not a regular species at Technopole. The Black-winged Stilts are breeding again, and the first two chicks – just a couple of days old – were seen yesterday, with at least two more birds on nests; a family of Moorhen was also a good breeding record.

Full eBird checklist from 13.4 here.

FranklinsGull_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2786

A sleepy Franklin’s Gull / Mouette de Franklin

 

Earlier this week at the Calao was just about as good in terms of tern diversity: again the usual Sandwich Terns which are passing through en masse at the moment, with some LCT’s in the mix, several dozen Common Terns and the odd Roseate Tern hurriedly yet graciously flying past the seawatch spot, and of course more Royal Terns en route to Langue de Barbarie or Mauritanian breeding sites, a lone Caspian Tern, and this time round an even less expected White-winged Tern (and just two Black Terns). Oh and also the first Arctic Tern of the season! The first birds in spring are typically seen at the end of March or first half of April; earliest dates (2015-2018) are 16.3.18 and 25.3.16. The numbers of migrating terns were really impressive here on Saturday 6.4: a rough estimate puts the number of Sandwich and Common Terns passing through at 500 and 1200, respectively, in just two hours.

At Ngor, regular morning sessions have yielded the usual Pomarine and Arctic Skuas, Northern Gannets, as well as a handful of Cape Verde Shearwaters feeding offshore on most days. Sooty Shearwaters passed through in good numbers on 6.4, while last Friday (12.4) was best for Sabine’s Gull: 73 birds in just one hour, so far my best spring count. Also several Long-tailed Skuas and the other day a South Polar or (more likely) a Great Skua was present, a rare spring sighting. All checklists for the recent Calao counts can be found on this eBird page.

 

CommonGreenshank_Technopole_20190413_IMG_2752

Greenshank & Black-winged Stilt / Chevalier aboyeur & Echasse blanche

 

 

Advertisements

Pelagic trip off Ngor

Why would two Portuguese, a Mauritanian, a Cape-Verdian, a French, an American and a Belgian set off on a boat trip one morning in October? Seabirds of course! With Gabriel in town, Bruce over from the US, Miguel and Antonio as motivated as ever to get out of the office and to have some of their BirdLife colleagues strengthen their seabird id skills, it was time to organise our now annual autumn pelagic, on October 1st.

Conditions were perfect to get out on our small boat (organised through Nautilus Diving: merci Hilda!) though probably a bit too calm for active seabird migration. We chose to head straight west to the edge of the continental shelf, rather than try the “trawler area” off Kayar as this is quite a bit more distant from Ngor. Needless to say that expectations were high as is always the case during these rare opportunities to get close views of the treasured tubenoses – storm petrels, shearwaters – skuas and maybe some Grey Phalaropes or Sabine’s Gulls.

NgorPlage_20181002_IMG_3333

Ngor plage

 

A Manx Shearwater zooming past the boat was one of the first pelagic species we got to see, followed by quite a few Sooty Shearwaters (Puffin fuligineux).

SootyShearwater_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3289

Sooty Shearwater / Puffin fuligineux (BP)

 

Further out, Wilson’s Storm Petrel became the dominant species, with a few dozen birds seen – and probably many more that went undetected – particularly around the upwelling area. Almost all were obviously actively migrating, and we managed to get some good views of several of them as they zoomed past our boat. Of course, several storm petrels remained unidentified, but we did manage to get decent views of at least two European Storm Petrels (though alas no pictures!). The toes projecting beyond the tail that are diagnostic of Wilson’s are more or less visible on the pictures below.

O. oceanicus Dakar 1 01102018 - A Araujo

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (A. Araujo)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2362 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

Wilsons Storm Petrel - DSC_2343 - B Mast

Wilson’s Strom Petrel / Océanite de Wilson (B. Mast)

 

Up next: skuas, or jaegers as our American friends call them. We didn’t see many, with just three Pomarines and just as few Arctic Skuas, as well as an obliging Long-tailed Skua. The latter was an interesting bird that we aged as a third-summer moulting into third-winter plumage. It briefly joined two Pomarine Skuas (second-year birds?) allowing for nice comparisons of size and structure.

 

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3325

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20181002_IMG_3327

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (BP)

Long-tailed Dakar 01102018 - A Araujo - cropped

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue (A. Araujo)

Long-tailed - Pomarine Skua - DSC_2305 - B Mast

Long-tailed & Pomarine Skuas / Labbes à longue queue & pomarin (B. Mast)

Pomarin Skua - DSC_2348 - B Mast

Pomarine Skuas / Labbes pomarins (B. Mast)

 

Rounding up our seabirds is this Red (Grey…) Phalarope (Phalarope à bec large), the only one we saw during the trip but somehow Bruce managed to get a picture:

Red Phalarope - DSC_2276 - B Mast

Red Phalarope / Phalarope à bec large (B. Mast)

 

As seems to be quite often the case during these pelagic trips, some landbirds were also encountered, in our case European Turtle Dove (Tourterelle des bois) of which we twice saw singles migrating over the ocean (in October 2016, the PAOC pelagic recorded at least three species of passerines, including a migrating Bluethroat). One of our doves had a very worn and messy plumage, probably a moulting young bird:

European Turtle Dove - DSC_2266 - B Mast

European Turtle Dove / Tourterelle des bois (B. Mast)

 

Our complete eBird checklist, expertly compiled by Miguel, can be found here. We really ought to add the Osprey that can just about be seen sitting on top of the Almadies lighthouse, but which was noticed only later on this neat picture by Bruce of the lighthouse – Africa’s westernmost building, constructed some time in the 19th century (precise date seems unknown?) on a reef that lies just off the Pointe des Almadies.

Phare des Almadies - DSC_2388 - B Mast

Le phare des Almadies… and an Osprey (B. Mast)

 

 

Many thanks to Antonio and Bruce for sharing their pictures!

 

 

Suivi de la migration d’automne à Ngor: août et septembre 2018

Depuis un peu plus de deux mois on a repris nos habitudes au Calao de Ngor cet automne (ai-je vraiment arrêté depuis l’an dernier?), pour voir ce que donne le cru 2018 pour ce qui est de la migration d’automne des oiseaux de mer. Le printemps avait déjà été pas mal, avec entre autres de beaux passages de Sternes voyageuses et de Dougall, de Mouettes de Sabine, et quelques espèces plus rares comme le Fou à pieds rouges, le Puffin de Macaronésie / de Barolo ou encore le Puffin majeur. Ayant eu un peu plus de temps libre et moins de voyages que d’habitude, j’ai donc repris le suivi régulier depuis fin juillet. J’étais curieux notamment de mieux suivre les mouvements en août et septembre, et finalement j’ai un peu mieux pu suivre ces deux mois que l’an dernier: entre le 30/7 et le 30/9, j’ai pu assurer une présence lors de 41 jours, pour environ 55 heures de suivi (2017: 40.5 heures sur 31 jours). A propos de notre suivi de l’an dernier, un article sur le suivi de la migration en 2017 est en cours de rédaction et sera partagé ici en temps voulu!

Les années se suivent mais se ne ressemblent pas: certaines espèces sont visiblement plus communes certaines années, et les conditions météo varient pas mal également. Ainsi, le mois d’août 2018 a été marqué par plusieurs jours de vent favorable (= vent soutenu de l’ouest a nord-ouest), et notamment le Labbe à longue queue a été bien plus nombreux a passer devant les cotes dakaroises qu’en 2017 et 2016. Idem pour les Phalaropes à bec large qui comme le labbe voient eux aussi s’établir un nouveau record journalier.

Comme d’hab’, voici donc une liste comme toujours un peu longue et ennuyeuse, agrémentée de quelques photos d’archives.

  • Océanites

Océanite de Wilson (Wilson’s Storm Petrel): au moins 159 oiseaux sont vus entre le 31/7 et le 23/8, avec un max. de 105 en 30′ de suivi le 13/8.

  • Puffins

Puffin du Cap-Vert (Cape Verde Shearwater): 97 ind. passent le 11/8 en 2h40′, suivi d’un isolé sur place le lendemain et deux oiseaux le 20/8.

Puffin fuligineux (Sooty Shearwater): comme en 2017, les premiers oiseaux apparaissent des les premiers jours de septembre, mais cette année les effectifs restent très modestes jusqu’à fin septembre: seulement 87 oiseaux du 2/9 au 30/9 alors que dans la même période l’an dernier il en passent 393 pour un effort comparable.

 

Sooty Shearwater / Puffin fuligineux
Puffin fuligineux / Sooty Shearwater  (Ngor, avril 2015)

Puffin des Anglais (Manx Shearwater): seuls six oiseaux sont détectés pour le moment, sans doute en raison de l’absence de bonnes conditions météo pour les puffins courant septembre, mois qui devrait marquer le pic du passage de cette espèce.

Puffin “d’Audubon” (Audubon’s Shearwater): à l’inverse, ce puffin généralement très pélagique a été vu bien plus que ces dernières années, avec 19 oiseaux pour le moment. Le premier oiseau passe le 11/8, puis le lendemain c’est un Puffin de Barolo qui est observé en migration active, assez près du rivage permettant son identification. Encore un Barolo ou Macaronésie le 28/8, et le 17/9 il y en a pas moins de 14 qui défilent en deux heures dont quelques groupes de 3-4 oiseaux migrant ensemble. Encore deux le 28/9, et peut-être qu’il en suivra encore quelques-uns dans les semaines à venir.

  • Fous

Fou de Bassan (Northern Gannet): un oiseau de 1ère année passe le 23/9 déjà (2017: premier le 18/9, puis un seul en octobre avant le véritable debut du passage début novembre).

Fou brun (Brown Booby): deux le 26 (un adulte et un imm.) et un imm. les 28 et 29/9 étaient probablement des oiseaux locaux en excursion de pêche depuis les îles de la Madeleine.

  • Limicoles

Comme je le disais dans l’intro, l’une des surprises de cette saison a été le passage important de Phalaropes à bec large (Red Phalarope) en août: alors que je n’avais noté aucun oiseau avant le 11/8, ce jour-la j’en dénombre pas moins de 825 en 2h40′ de suivi le matin, plus encore 35 en 40′ le soir – apparemment un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal, à en croire les chiffres a notre disposition. Plus rien les jours suivants, jusqu’au 18/8 lorsque quelques 65 oiseaux passent en deux groupes – toujours aussi difficiles à estimer! – 37 le 20/8, etc. jusqu’au 2/9. Encore 55 le 17/9, pour un total tout à fait honnête de 1256 oiseaux. Sans doute que plusieurs milliers sont passes au total, loin au large ou invisible entre les vagues. Parmi les autres limicoles, retenons le Courlis corlieu (Whimbrel) avec 415 ind., deux Barges rousses (Bar-tailed Godwit), 28 Huîtriers pies (Oystercatcher) dont 13 ce matin, deux groupes de Bécasseaux maubèches (Red Knot), quelques Tournepierres (Turnstone), un Combattant varié (Ruff), deux Grands Gravelots (Common Ringed Plover) et quelques Chevaliers gambettes et guignettes (Common Redshank & Common Sandpiper).

  • Laridés

Mouette de Sabine (Sabine’s Gull): un avant-coureur passe le 30/7 déjà, constituant peut-être bien la premiere observation de juillet pour le site. Passage plus ou moins régulier bien qu’en effectifs très faibles – comme il se doit en août et septembre – du 11 au 22/8 lors d’une période de vents favorables, puis sept le 1/9 et en tout 31 en 2h45 de suivi les 17-18/9. Encore cinq le 24/9 puis plus rien depuis! On attendra donc le gros passage de la deuxième moitie d’octobre pour cette espèce. Peu d’autres laridés pour le moment, mais tout de même à signaler un Goéland leucophée adulte (ou presque) le 23/8.

  • Sternes & Guifettes

Sterne naine (Little Tern): 129 individus pour le moment, soit le même ordre de grandeur que l’an dernier à la même periode (idem pour la Sterne caspienne (Caspian Tern), avec 27 oiseaux au compteur).

Guifette noire (Black Tern): avec 4402 oiseaux, c’est pour l’instant la deuxième espèce la plus nombreuse: pas mal d’oiseaux vers la mi-août, puis petit max. horaire de 460 le 18/9. Au moins une Guifette leucoptère (White-winged Tern) est identifiée le 11/8.

Une Sterne bridée (Bridled Tern) est vue en vol vers le NE le 9/8, suivi d’un individu vers le SW deux jours plus tard, et deux oiseaux (adulte et juv.) sur place le 22/8 – probablement des oiseaux ayant niche aux iles de la Madeleine ou au moins 3-4 couples ont été vus en juillet dernier. Plus surprenante, une jeune Sterne fuligineuse (Sooty Tern) passe vers le SW le matin du 17/9, ma première obs de l’espèce ici et en fait première obs tout court – coche √ 🙂

 

BridledTern_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170624_IMG_2758
Sterne bridée / Bridled Tern (Iles de la Madeleine, June 2017)

Sterne de Dougall (Roseate Tern): avec 133 Dougall dénombrés, on dépasse déjà d’un tiers l’effectif total de l’an dernier, avec un maximum de 41 oiseaux en 2h de suivi le 17/9. Toujours sympa de voir cette belle espèce, dont le statut de conservation en Europe est plutôt précaire avec des effectifs ne dépassant pas les 1900 couples au début des années 2000, essentiellement aux Açores et en Irlande.

Sternes pierregarin et Sterne arctique (Common & Arctic Terns): 8760 ind., en flot plus ou moins continu depuis le démarrage du suivi. La Sterne arctique était visiblement l’espèce dominante en août et début septembre, mais actuellement la tendance est en train de s’inverser, et la Pierregarin devrait logiquement être la plus commune courant octobre et novembre.

Sterne voyageuse (Lesser Crested Tern): au moins 187, généralement en groupes de 2-3 oiseaux suivant les Sternes caugeks, rarement plus d’une dizaine par heure.

Sterne caugek (Sandwich Tern): Troisième espèce la plus nombreuse, avec 2429 migrateurs pour le moment, dont 2000 passent dans la 2e moitié de septembre.

Sterne royale africaine (African Royal Tern): déjà 897 oiseaux, soit un peu plus du double de l’an dernier. Environ 45% de cet effectif défile pendant la dernière décade d’août, avec des maxima de 136/heure le 25.

  • Labbes

Labbe à longue queue (Long-tailed Skua): au moins 478 individus! Le passage débute soudainement le 10/8 – jour d’observation des premiers labbes – avec au moins neuf en 1h30, suivis le lendemain par un bel effectif de 70 oiseaux en 2h40 de suivi et quasiment tous les jours par quelques-uns ou quelques dizaines de migrateurs jusqu’au 22/8. Ensuite rien pendant quatre jours, puis reprise modeste tout à la fin du mois pour culminer le 2/9 avec un effectif impressionant de 217 individus en 1h15 de suivi. Sauf erreur c’est un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal, établi en à peine une heure d’observation: combien sont passés en tout ce jour-la? Sans doute plus d’un millier… Cette espèce est bien connue pour ses fluctuations d’effectifs d’année en année: sur les sites de nidification en fonction de l’abondance de nourriture, et visiblement sur les sites d’observation côtiers comme Ngor en fonction des vents pouvant pousser les migrateurs plus près des rivages. En 2017, je n’avais eu que 126 individus; même en prenant en compte l’absence de suivi à la mi-août et pendant plusieurs jours en septembre, il est clair que c’était une “petite” année à Labbes à longue queue, contrairement à 2018.

 

 
Labbe parasite (Arctic Skua): 266 individus au compteur, auxquels il convient d’ajouter sans doute une bonne partie des 82 labbes “sp.”; Seuls six Labbes pomarins (Pomarine Skua) pour le moment, avec le premier certain le 30/8.

Labbe de McCormick (South Polar Skua): un oiseau typique passe assez près du bord le 20/9.

 

Pendant les trois mois qui restent pour cette saison 2018 j’aurai un peu moins de temps que l’an dernier pour suivre ce spectacle de la migration: avis aux amateurs qui souhaiteraient venir en renforts!

Puis il faudrait que je trouve le temps de vous parler de nos sorties récentes au lac Tanma, à la lagune de Yène, et le lac Rose… Mais avant toute chose, demain matin on a prévu une sortie en mer au large de Ngor! Compte-rendu et photos à suivre, si tout va bien.

Ngor spring migration: May 2018

 

Following on our April summary, here’s a brief update on results from last month’s short but regular seawatch sessions from Ngor, as usual all from the Club Calao terrace. Managed a total of 10 sessions between May 10th and May 26th, with more good stuff to report on, including a lifer!

Again, no pictures other than a few old ones that I’m recycling here… and yet again a pretty dull species list.

 

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel (Océanite de Wilson): unidentified storm-petrels were regularly seen in small numbers, and most likely referred to this species.

Cape Verde Shearwater (Puffin du Cap-Vert) were seen in good numbers on most days, feeding off Ngor or flying NE, with a max. of at least 540 birds in one hour on 26th. Not as many as last year when the maximum counted on a single day exceeded 5,000 birds (!), but the pattern of appearance and behaviour of birds is very much in line with the previous season.

CapeVerdeShearwater_Ngor_20170415_IMG_1253

Cape Verde Shearwater / Puffin du Cap-Vert, off Ngor, April 2018

 

Cory’s / Scopoli’s Shearwater (Puffin cendré / de Scopoli): at least three on 26th when there was a remarkable diversity of shearwaters, with five species noted. Probably also a few on 11th, 14th and 15th but too far or seen too briefly to positively identify.

Two to five Great Shearwater (Puffin majeur) seen flying NE amidst the other shearwaters on 26th – remarkably similar to last year’s record of two birds on May 25th, noted as “apparently migrating north” and thought to be the first May record – see the short paper we published in the latest volume of Malimbus on a “wreckage” of Great Shearwater in the the occurrence in Senegal & Gambia (Barlow et al. 2018), PDF available here on my ResearchGate page.

GreatShearwater_Pelagic_20171115_IMG_5887

Great Shearwater / Puffin majeur, off Kayar, Nov. 2017

 

Sooty Shearwater (Puffin fuligineux): a few seen on 18th, 21st and 26th, with at least 12 birds on the latter date: these records suggest that this Southern Hemisphere breeder is slightly more numerous later in spring.

Boyd’s / Barolo Shearwater (Puffin de Boyd / Macaronésie): one on 21st seen at fairly close range was identified as  Barolo Shearwater – for once it was close enough and I was able to follow it over quite a distance. Probably a bird en route to its breeding grounds. Another one, also flying north-east, was either baroli or boydi. The taxonomic situation of these small black and white shearwaters is complex and seems to be constantly changing. with BirdLife and HBW now treating both taxa as subspecies of Audubon’s Shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri). Either way, these are apparently quite rare spring records, though Dupuy (1984) lists what was then known as “Little Shearwater” as an uncommon offshore “summer” visitor. Boyd’s Shearwater breeds exclusively on the Cape Verde islands (only about 5,000 pairs!), while Barolo’s breeds further north on the Macaronesian islands where it is known from Madeira, the Azores, the Selvagems, and the Canary Islands, with a total breeding population of the same order of magnitude.

Northern Gannet (Fou de Bassan): seen in small numbers on most days; all but one were immature birds (and one on 15th may actually have been a Cape Gannet, but I couldn’t rule out a 4th year Northern Gannet as I didn’t see the underwing pattern…).

Red-footed Booby (Fou à pieds rouges): a species I’d never seen before but somehow expected to show up one day at Ngor, two were seen feeding in the surf just beyond the Ngor islet on 17th, nicely showing their pink (not red!) feet, bluish bill and uniform brown plumage. One was seen again the following day and what I assume are the same two birds (both dark morph adults or near-adults) on 22nd, when they appeared to take off from the islet where they may have spent the night. Third record for Senegal! More on this species, which will likely show up more frequently in coming years, in this recent post.

RedfootedBooby_Dakar_20161016_BarendvanGemerden - 1

Red-footed Booby / Fou à pieds rouges off Kayar, Oct. 2016 (B. van Gemerden)

 

Brown Booby (Fou brun): just one record so far, of an immature (2nd c.y.) on 14th. Looks like the Iles de la Madeleine birds – if they are indeed still present – don’t wander around the peninsula too much.

A few Great While Pelicans were regularly seen, flying about or resting out at sea (and once on the islet), and on 26th a Pink-backed Pelican made an appearance (Pélicans blancs et gris).

Other than an Oystercatcher on 20th and three Whimbrels on 11th (and a few Common Sandpipers), no more waders were seen during May (Huîtrier pie, Courlis corlieu, Chevalier guignette).

Long-tailed Skua (Labbe à longue queue): following several records in the latter half of April, at least three were identified on 11th, one on 18th, and one on 26th – confirming that spring migration of this species occurs up to the end of May off Senegal. Pomarine and Arctic Skuas were much scarcer than in April, with just three records for the former and five for the latter species.

LongtailedSkua_Ngor_20170415_IMG_1171

Long-tailed Skua / Labbe à longue queue imm. off Ngor, April 2017

 

Audouin’s Gull (Goéland d’Audouin): up to three birds seen in any one session, though no notable active migrants as was the case in April; all were immature birds.

Sabine’s Gull (Mouette de Sabine) were recorded up to May 22nd, with four records of 1-9 actively migrating birds. Other gull species included 10 Grey-headed Gulls flying NE on 20th, and three Slender-billed Gulls on 22nd. A single Lesser Black-backed Gull was seen on 22nd, when a probable Kelp Gull was also present.

Single Bridled Tern (Sterne bridée) were seen feeding and flying around quite close to shore on 11th and 15th, bringing the total to three birds so far this season.

Lesser Crested Tern (Sterne voyageuse): seen twice (17th & 20th), unlike African Royal Tern (Sterne royale) which remained present in decent numbers throughout. Caspian Tern (Sterne caspienne) was seen just once, on 22nd.

Roseate Tern (Sterne de Dougall): following a decent passage in April, just one seen on 17th, though others may have passed through further offshore amidst Common and Arctic Terns (Sternes pierragarin et arctique). These two species were seen almost daily, but again in much smaller numbers than in April.

Three Whiskered Terns (Guifette moustac) flew past on 11th, followed by two White-winged Terns (Guifette leucoptère) on 21st. Black Terns (Guifette noire) were less numerous than in April, except on May 11th when about 300 birds were counted.

Let’s see what June brings! Assuming that I manage to make it out to the Calao…

 

Ngor spring migration: April 2018

Quick update on this past month’s seawatch sessions from Ngor, as there have been a few good species lately. As usual, most of these are from short sessions at the Calao, with a few from Pointe des Almadies and from a mini-pelagic on April 22nd. Here’s a rather dull species list, but given that still fairy little is known about the phenology of spring seabird migration off Dakar, I thought it would be worthwhile reviewing them here. I don’t really have any recent pictures to illustrate these records, except for a really poor header picture of a Sabine’s Gull actively migrating past the Pointe, and a few older pics that I’m recycling in this blog post.

So here we go:

Cape Verde Shearwater (Puffin du Cap-Vert): the first few birds were seen on 3.3 (min. 2), then ca. 20 on 16-17.3, and a regular presence was noted throughout April when seen during most sessions from 4th, typically 50-100 birds feeding offshore, at most ca. 490 birds on 27th (but just a handful the next day and none seen on 29th!).

Scopoli’s Shearwater (Puffin de Scopoli): at least one during our boat trip on 22.4, with Cory’s or Scopoli’s noted from Ngor on 28th (as well as on March 3rd & 11th).

Sooty Shearwater (Puffin fuligineux): first seen on 16.3, then again singles on 31/3 and 7/4, and at least three birds on 20th. Not much… and note that we didn’t see a single bird  during our boat trip.

European Storm-Petrel (Océanite tempête): after a good presence during the first half of February, the species was seen again on 22.4 from the boat, with a minimum of two birds.

Wilson’s Storm-Petrel (Océanite de Wilson): at least six were seen on 22.4, again during our boat trip. Unidentified storm-petrels migrating past the Calao on 7th (min. 8), 11th (3), 20th (3) and 29th (1) were likely this species, though others can’t be ruled out – when seen from land, these birds can be incredibly difficult to identify due to either the distance or the very brief sightings as they always fly low over the water surface and are typically seen only for a second or two before they disappear again in between waves.

Northern Gannet (Fou de Bassan): at most ca. 175 on 31.3, with numbers gradually decreasing throughout April. Curiously, no marked NE-ward passage was noted.

NorthernGannet_Ngor_20170415_IMG_1175 (2)

Northern Gannet / Fou de Bassan, Ngor, April 2017

 

Grey (Red) Phalarope (Phalarope à bec large): four migrating on 29th was a good spring record! Other than these, the only waders seen during this period were a few groups of Whimbrel (Courlis corlieu).

Long-tailed Skua (Labbe à longue queue) single adults passing through on 20, 21 & 25.4, two on 26th, and an immature flew past on 29th. Pomarine and Arctic Skuas were seen in small numbers on most days, many of which were flying NE (though rarely more than five in any one session).

Lesser Black-backed Gull (Goéland brun): usually present in small numbers, either feeding in the surf or migrating past Ngor. There was obviously a peak around mid-March, with 107 passing through in just 40 minutes on 16.3, and 52 in half an hour the next day.

Audouin’s Gull (Goéland d’Audouin): typically between one and five birds seen on any one session, but on 16.3 there were 27 (incl. three adults) migrating past in 40 minutes and 14 the following day (in 30 minutes) – thus coinciding with the peak of the previous species.

Sabine’s Gull (Mouette de Sabine): after the first five on 4.4, becomes increasingly frequent towards the end of the month, with a max. of ca. 40 during our 22.4 boat trip, and 31 on 27th in just one hour. Actual numbers must be quite a bit higher as this species mostly passes through far out, typically in small groups. Sometimes a few birds would migrate closer to shore, and occasionally some would be feeding or resting just in front of the Calao. Other gull species included a surprising flock of 31 Grey-headed Gulls flying NE on 27th, and six Slender-billeds at Pointe des Almadies the following day.

Bridled Tern (Sterne bridée): one passing to the NE at fairly short range on 26.4 was a very nice surprise, as I’d only seen the species once before here (and more generally, away from the Iles de la Madeleine breeding grounds). It also appears to be an early date for the species, as it is typically seen in May-July. My only previous Ngor record was of three birds flying SW on 10 June ’16. Sauvage & Rodwell give the range of 27/4 – 9/7 for PNIM, and A. R. Dupuy recorded the species no less than eleven times from Pointe des Almadies from 26 May to 14 July ’92.

BridledTern_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170624_IMG_2758

Bridled Tern / Sterne bridee, Iles de la Madeleine, June 2017

 

Lesser Crested Tern (Sterne voyageuse): seen in small numbers throughout the month, with a good max. of at least 178 birds passing through on 9th, in just 65 minutes. African Royal Tern (Sterne royale) was seen on most days, typically in small numbers. Much less frequent were Caspian Tern (Sterne caspienne; singles on 31.3 and 28.4) and Little Tern (Sterne naine; one on 6.4, and a group of 16 migrating on 29th).

Roseate Tern (Sterne de Dougall): first seen on 31.3, then regular until the middle of the month with a max. of no less than 56 on 9th in just over an hour. Also singles on 26th and 28th. Most birds were actively migrating, with a few feeding locally with the mixed tern flock.

Arctic Tern (Sterne arctique): the first four birds were seen on 16.3, becoming regular from the end of March and seen on most sessions in April, max. ca. 70 on 24th though numbers probably higher as 1) species difficult to count, and many common/Arctic terns noted.

White-winged Tern (Guifette leucoptère): one flew past on 16.3, and a fine adult in summer plumage was feeding among the numerous Black Terns on 28.4 (Guifette noire). The latter species is seen pretty much during every session, with a maximum towards the end of the month: probably more well over 1,200 birds on 28th. An adult Whiskered Tern (Guifette moustac) was seen on 22nd, flying NE.

That’s about it for now.

On the raptors front, Osprey has been a regular sighting, as always during winter, until 31.3 at Ngor, after which one was seen on 13.4 at Mamelles and on 14.4 at PNIM. A few young birds may still hang around of course. The wintering pair of Peregrines was last seen on 20.4 roosting on the Diarama hotel, and two birds were seen roosting in the Mamelles cliff on 22.4 – pretty intriguing!

 

 

Un nouveau fou aux Iles de la Madeleine…

Les fous des Iles de la Madeleine, j’en avais déjà parlé ici, en décembre 2016, pour faire le point sur le statut du Fou brun dans la région. Ce superbe oiseau marin est, depuis, signalé quasiment lors de chaque sortie au “PNIM” et plus particulièrement entre octobre et mai, et on le voit de temps en temps passer ou pêcher devant Ngor. Pas encore d’indices probants de sa nidification, mais ce n’est peut-être qu’une question de temps… voir plus bas.

Cette fois, c’est d’un autre fou dont il s’agit, et pas de celui que vous pensez – des Fous de Bassan, il y en a plein qui passent l’hiver dans les eaux dakaroises, et en ce moment même on les voit facilement de part et d’autre de la péninsule, que ce soit à Ngor ou devant les Mamelles.

En effet, il s’avère qu’un fou photographié le 26 janvier dernier par un groupe d’ornithos canadiennes (équipe 100% féminine, c’est assez rare chez les ornithos pour le souligner!), était en fait un Fou à pieds rouges (Red-footed Booby), et non un Fou brun (Brown Booby) comme initialement identifié. C’est grâce à une remarque laissée par un utilisateur d’eBird ayant mis en doute l’identité (« semble avoir les pieds étonnamment rouges pour un Fou brun! »), que la donnée est passée dans la liste à valider sur eBird, liste que je scrute de temps en temps en tant que vérificateur pour le Sénégal.

Et effectivement, l’oiseau pris en photo montre bien un Fou à pieds rouges, un individu de forme sombre – et qui du coup ressemble pas mal au Fou brun (et dont un oiseau était présent le même jour). Il se tenait sur la fameuse balise rouge et blanche qui sert très souvent de reposoir au Fous bruns, situé un peu au nord-est des îles.

RedfootedBooby_IlesdelaMadeleine_20180126_MarieONeill - 2

Red-footed Booby / Fou à pieds rouges (D. Thériault)

 

L’identification est relativement facile ici, d’une part parce qu’on voit encore tout juste les pattes roses, d’autre part parce que le plumage est brun uniforme y compris sur le ventre, sans contraste (même flou) comme chez les Fous bruns immatures. De plus, le bec relativement court et peu épais pour un sulidé, avec une base rosée et un cercle orbital bleu, est typique pour l’espèce. Notre oiseau montre également un front légèrement bombé, alors que chez le Fou brun il n’y a quasiment pas de front: la base du bec épais est dans la prolongation directe de la calotte, rendant la tête moins rondouillarde que chez le brun.

L’âge par contre est moins facile à déterminer: très probablement un immature, car le bec n’est pas bleu mais plutôt gris sur fond rose et peut-être que la couleur des pattes (rose et non rouge vif) est également un signe d’immaturité.

RedfootedBooby_IlesdelaMadeleine_20180126_MarieONeill - 1

Red-footed Booby / Fou à pieds rouges (M. O’Neill)

 

A comparer maintenant avec le Fou brun immature : ci-dessous, un oiseau d’un voire deux ans, ici en avril 2017 en compagnie de deux adultes. Les critères le distinguant du Fou à pieds rouges de forme sombre sont notamment la couleur des pattes et du bec, le contraste entre d’une part le ventre plus clair et d’autre part la poitrine et le dessus sombres, ainsi que la coloration générale plus sombre et moins pâle que son cousin à pieds rouges.

BrownBooby_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170429_IMG_1850 (2)

Brown Booby / Fou brun imm. (gauche) et adultes (avril 2017)

 

C’est seulement la deuxième donnée de l’espèce au Sénégal, donc c’est loin d’être anodin comme observation! La précédente date d’octobre 2016, lorsqu’un oiseau est observé au cours d’une sortie en mer en marge du PAOC, à une vingtaine de kilomètres au large de Yoff – les détails de cette première observation pour le pays seront publiés dans le prochain bulletin de l’African Bird Club, à paraitre en septembre et que l’on partagera en temps voulu (Moran N. et al., First record of Red-footed Booby Sula sula for Senegal, voir photo ci-dessous).

 

RedfootedBooby_Dakar_20161016_BarendvanGemerden - 2

Red-footed Booby / Fou à pieds rouges, oct. 2016 (B. van Gemerden)

 

Le Fou à pieds rouges est une espèce marine tropicale plutôt répandue, et est classée non menacée par l’UICN bien que la population globale soit considérée comme étant en déclin. Les colonies les plus proches se trouvent sur l’île d’Ascension dans l’Atlantique Sud et sur l’archipel Fernando de Noronha (NE du Brésil). Il hiverne sur des îles tropicales sur tous les océans, en gros entre les deux tropiques.

Jusqu’à récemment l’espèce était un visiteur rare aux Îles du Cap-Vert, mais en octobre 2016, au moins 17 individus étaient présents à Raso, puis en octobre 2017 apparemment une centaine!! Autant dire que c’est l’explosion des effectifs, même si aucune nidification certaine n’a été rapportée pour le moment – du moins pas à notre connaissance. On peut donc s’attendre à d’autres observations dans les eaux sénégalaises à l’avenir, et j’espère bien sûr le voir un jour passer devant le Calao ou encore au PNIM. [addendum du 17/5/18: ce matin j’ai eu la chance d’en voir deux en train de pêcher longuement devant Ngor, non loin du rivage! Je ne pensais pas que je verrais l’espèce aussi rapidement…]

Ailleurs dans la région, Sula sula a été vu devant les côtes mauritaniennes (au moins un en oct.-nov. 2012), et des individus ont été signalés aux iles Canaries, aux Açores, et à Madeire. L’espèce est très rare plus au nord, avec p.ex. tout juste deux observations en France (un sur le lac de Sainte-Croix dans les Alpes-de-Haute-Provence en juillet 2011, puis un en juin 2017 en Bretagne dans la colonie des Fous de Bassan des Sept-Iles – voir l’article sur Ornithomedia). Ou encore cet oiseau trouvé épuisé sur une plage de l’East Sussex en septembre 2016, le premier pour la Grande-Bretagne.

Je reviens encore brièvement sur les Fous bruns, car samedi dernier (14/4) lors d’une visite aux Iles de la Madeleine nous avons pu observer de nouveau au moins sept individus : cinq posés dans leur falaise habituelle des îles Lougnes¹ (trois adultes, un subadulte, et un jeune au plumage similaire à celui de la photo d’avril 2017), puis encore deux adultes sur la fameuse balise marine, en train de parader lorsque nous passons à côté en bateau… Situation très similaire voire identique donc à celle d’avril-mai 2017, et toujours aussi intriguante: à quand la première nidification de l’espèce? Ci-dessous encore une photo médiocre de quatre de ces oiseaux dans leur falaise, prise lors de notre visite la plus récente, pour vous donner une idée.

BrownBooby_IlesdelaMadeleine_20180414_IMG_1794

Brown Booby / Fou brun (avril 2018)

 

Samedi dernier il restait encore quelques Fous de Bassan, deux Courlis corlieux et deux Balbuzards, mais sinon peu d’oiseaux sur l’île. Lors de la traversée depuis Soumbedioune on a pu voir un Océanite de Wilson passer tout près, un Labbe pomarin, et plusieurs sternes (Dougall, arctique, pierregarn, caugek, voyageuse et royale) ainsi que quelques Guifettes noires en migration active (Northern Gannet, Whimbrel, Osprey, Wilson’s Storm-Petrel, Pomarine Skua, Roseate, Arctic, Common, Sandwich, Lesser Crested, Royal & Black Terns). Et bien sûr les Phaétons à bec rouge, emblème du parc, dont la nidification bat encore son plein; on a d’ailleurs eu la chance de renconter l’experte Ngoné Diop en train de faire le suivi de la colonie, qui abriterait cette saison au moins 40-50 couples nicheurs (Red-billed-Tropicbird).

 

Merci aux observateurs tout d’abord: Hélène Gauthier, Marie O’Neill, Lorraine Plante, Diane Thériault. Et à Nick Moran et Barend van Gemerden pour avoir fourni les photos et la version finale de l’article sur la première observation sénégalaise. Et enfin, à tout seigneur tout honneur: c’est Brennan Mulrooney qui à signalé la donnée sur eBird, sans quoi elle aurait bien pu passer à travers les mailles du filet!

 

¹ Les îles Lougnes sont cees îlots rocheux inaccessibles faisant partie du parc national, photo ici.

 

 

La migration en mer devant Dakar: l’automne 2017 (2ème partie)

Comme promis, ci-dessous la suite de notre petite synthèse du suivi de la migration à Ngor. Au cas où vous l’auriez loupée, la première partie se trouve ici.

PomarineSkua_Pelagic_20171115_IMG_6003

Pomarine Skua moulting / Labbe pomarin en mue (2nd c.y.?), Nov. 2017

Je reprends ici le tableau des espèces, même si cette deuxième partie traite uniquement des limicoles, labbes, laridés, sternes et de quelques autres migrateurs (cliquez/tapez pour agrandir).

Seawatch_2017_Summary

Limicoles (Waders)

  • Huîtrier pie (Eurasian Oystercatcher): vu lors d’une séance sur quatre, c’est avec l’espèce suivante le limicole le plus régulier. Généralement des oiseaux isolés ou par 2-3 ensemble, rarement plus (max. de 7 le 12/10).
  • Courlis corlieu (Whimbrel): de loin le limicole le plus nombreux, avec plus de 500 oiseaux dénombrés. Le passage s’effectue – sans surprise – tôt en saison, les premiers oiseaux étant observés le 28/7 (certainement que d’autres les avaient déjà précédés courant juillet, le Corlieu étant l’un des migrateurs paléarctiques les plus précoces). Le matin du 9/8, ce ne sont pas moins de 293 Courlis corlieux qui passent devant le Calao, en 3h30 de suivi… impressionnant! Les effectifs deviennent plus modestes dès le début du mois de septembre, avec un dernier migrateur supposé le 27/10.
  • Barge rousse (Bar-tailed Godwit): ce limicole venu du Grand Nord est bien moins fréquent que l’espèce précédente, qu’il accompagne d’ailleurs volontiers. Plus de la moitié des 67 barges sont vues le 24/8, après quoi le passage est occasionnel avec des petits effectifs à chaque fois.
  • Phalarope à bec large (Grey Phalarope): le seul limicole “pélagique”, cette espèce ne s’observe pas très souvent depuis le Calao; seuls une centaine d’oiseaux sont vus dont 70 qui passent en trois groupes le 28/10, suivis par 24 le 6/11. Quelques observations lointaines de limicoles indéterminés qui pourraient bien se rapporter à cette espèce.
  • D’autres limicoles vus en migration active sont le Courlis cendré (deux le 5/9), le Grand Gravelot, les Chevaliers gambette, aboyeur, guignette et même culblanc, le Combattant varié; aussi Bécasseaux sanderling, cocorli, variable, minute, et le Tournepierre. La plupart de ces limis sont vus lors des matinées pluvieuses, ou après des averses nocturnes, comme ce fut le cas le 24/8 lorsque pas moins de neuf espèces sont vues en migration active.
Oystercatcher_Ngor_20170930_IMG_4931

Oystercatcher / Huîtrier en escale devant le Calao

Labbes (Skuas/Jaegers)

Avec un total de 5’882 labbes dénombrés, il s’agit là du 3e groupe le plus nombreux à passer devant Ngor, après les puffins (36’335 ind.) et le sternes (22’307 ind.).

  • Labbe de McCormick / Grand Labbe (South Polar / Great Skua): la présence des deux espèces a été confirmée dans les eaux dakaroises, mais leur identification reste toujours délicate voire impossible sur le terrain, du moins en l’absence de bonnes photos. Ceci vaut encore plus pour les oiseaux vus en migration active, typiquement vus de loin et pendant quelques secondes ou 1-2 minutes tout au plus, leur séparation est généralement impossible. J’ai donc noté seulement quelques individus typiques comme étant des McCormick sûrs, soit les oiseaux de forme claire ou intermédiaire vus suffisamment bien. Le premier “grand labbe” est vu le 23/8 déjà – date hâtive pour un Grand, donc plutôt McCormick? – puis des isolés passent les 18 et 20/9. Le 8/10 je note un McCormick, le lendemain deux “sp.”, trois le 14/10, puis ce n’est que du 18/10 au 31/10 que ces oiseaux sont vus quasi quotidiennement, avec un max. horaire de 8 le soir du 24/10 – un peu moins donc que l’an dernier à la même période. Encore deux observations fin novembre et une le 3/12, portant le total à 75 oiseaux pour la saison.
  • Labbe pomarin (Pomarine Skua): avec un minimum de 3’368 oiseaux comptes, c’est l’une des espèces les plus nombreuses à passer devant Ngor. Le passage est régulier dès le 31/8, culminant dans la dernière semaine d’octobre et la première décade de novembre. Le maximum est noté le 7/11: pas moins de 957 individus en deux heures de suivi a peine! La fin du passage n’est pas incluse dans ce suivi 2017, car des oiseaux continuent de migrer encore, en nombres variables selon les jours, jusqu’à la 2e décade de décembre en tout cas (p.ex. 47 inds. en 75 min. le 15/12), avec certainement encore quelques oiseaux encore tout à la fin du mois. A noter qu’une bonne partie des 1’731 labbes non identifiés étaient sans doute des Pomarins – probablement au moins les deux tiers, car en plus d’être de loin le labbe le plus fréquent, la plupart des labbes non identifiés sont ceux qui passent loin au large, et on a l’impression – partagée par les équipes des années 2000 – que le Pomarin passe généralement plus au large que le Parasite, qui lui migre volontiers plus près des côtes. Sur l’ensemble de la saison, le rapport Pomarin/Parasite s’établit à environ 6:1.
  • Labbe parasite (Arctic Skua): espèce très régulière bien qu’en petits effectifs, de la dernière décade d’août jusqu’à la fin de la saison. Comme indiqué sur le graphique ci-dessous, il n’y a pas eu de pic bien net, contrairement au labbe précédent qui passe en force pendant une période bien concentrée. On constate également des différences dans le comportement de ces deux labbes: lors des jours de forte migration, les Pomarins passent souvent en groupes lâches comprenant jusqu’à plusieurs dizaines d’individus (max. env. 70 ensemble!), alors que le Parasite migre typiquement seul ou en paires, rarement plus de 3-4 oiseaux ensemble. Autre différence, le Pomarin migre régulièrement assez haut dans le ciel.
  • Labbe à longue queue (Long-tailed Skua): sur les 125 individus dénombrés, 123 sont passés vers le SW – effectif probablement légèrement sous-estimé, car quelques labbes indéterminés sont notés comme “Longue queue ou Parasite”. Ce labbe peut être vu de la mi-août jusqu’à mi-novembre, bien que les deux derniers individus (16 et 21/11) n’étaient pas en migration active: sans doute des oiseaux en escale. Les adultes passent surtout en août et septembre, alors qu’en octobre on voit essentiellement des immatures. Malheureusement je n’ai pas eu le luxe de noter les classes d’âge pour les labbes – là j’aurais besoin de renforts! – donc difficile d’en dire plus sur la répartition précise des immatures et des adultes au fil de la saison chez les trois “petites” espèces.

Skuas_2017_chart

Mouettes & Goélands (Gulls)

  • Mouette de Sabine (Sabine’s Gull): cette belle mouette est sans aucun doute l’une des espèces phares du site, et cette saison on n’a pas été déçus: après un avant-coureur vu le 9/8 déjà, le passage s’amorce timidement dès la fin août, pour devenir régulier à partir du 18/9 au moins. Un premier petit pic est noté le 21/9 (66 inds. en 1h15), puis le 10/10 (84 en 1h30), le 16/10 (182 en 2h)… effectifs qui nous semblaient déjà tout à fait corrects. C’était sans compter (pour ainsi dire!) sur la suite de la saison: Après cinq jours avec à peine quelques individus (sans doute lié aux vents dominants du N/NNE), j’en vois 484 en 2h30 de suivi le 24/10, puis le matin du 25/10, Miguel et moi en comptent pas moins de 1’415 (!) en 3h30, avec encore 77 individus supplémentaires comptés le soir en 1h20. Cela porte donc le total à 1’492 Mouettes de Sabine: à notre connaissance il s’agit là d’un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal et sans doute pour l’ensemble de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. En extrapolant, on peut estimer l’effectif total à quelques 4’850 oiseaux pour cette seule journée du 25/10! Quel spectacle que de voir des groupes de 20, 30 Mouettes de Sabines défiler à la queue-leu-leu… Il y a encore eu quelques bons jours début novembre, puis la migration s’arrête assez brusquement après le 13/11, lorsque les vents tournent vers le N/NE. Deux retardataires le 21/11 et un seul le 1/12 portent finalement le total de la saison à 3’326 oiseaux. Plus encore que pour les autres espèces pélagiques, le passage de cet oiseau devant les côtes est fortement influencé par la direction des vents: quasiment toutes les observations sont faites par vent modéré d’ouest à nord-ouest. Les autres jours, elle doit passer bien plus au large. Là non plus, il n’a pas été possible de tenir des statistiques sur les âges, mais c’est sûr qu’il y avait en tout cas cette année une forte proportion d’adultes; les juvéniles sont plutôt vus en fin de saison.

SabinesGull_2017_chart

  • Pour ce qui est des autres laridés, il y a surtout le Goéland d’Audouin: (voir cet article pour en savoir plus sur son statut au Sénégal) et le Goéland brun (Audouin’s & Lesser Black-backed Gulls). Une centaine pour le premier (env. 85 vers le SW) et 24 oiseaux (dont 14 vers le SW) pour le deuxième, auxquels il faut ajouter 16 “grands goélands indéterminés”, soit des Leucophées, bruns ou dominicains. Un très probable Goéland dominicain (Kelp Gull) passe le 11/8. Le Goéland railleur est vu à cinq reprises seulement, entre le 9/8 et le 8/11, la Mouette à tête grise seulement deux fois (isolés les 18 et 24/9) (Slender-billed & Grey-headed Gulls).

 

Sternes (Terns)

  • Sterne arctique / pierregarin (Arctic / Common Tern): cette paire regroupe 50% (49,8% pour être précis!) de toutes les sternes notées en migration, mais vu la difficulté de distinguer entre les deux taxons lorsque les groupes défilent rapidement devant le site de suivi, j’avais fait le choix de toujours les grouper – ce qui une fois de plus montre les limites de faire un tel suivi tout seul! De plus, j’ai dû estimer le passage certains jours de fort passage, et lorsque les oiseaux passaient très proches du rivage voire haut dans le ciel (surtout le cas avec l’Arctique) j’ai dû en louper pas mal. Du coup, difficile d’interpréter la phénologie telle que suggérée par la courbe ci-dessous. On y note toutefois un net pic à fin septembre, avec une moyenne horaire de près de 300 individus. Le pic de la Sterne arctique se situe apparemment plus tôt en saison (fin août/début septembre); celui de la Pierregarin environ un mois plus tard.

Common-ArcticTern_2017_chart

  • Sterne de Dougall (Roseate Tern): le total de 98 individus est à considérer comme un stricte minimum, car plusieurs individus sont sans doute passés inaperçus dans le flot de Pierregarins et Arctiques sans se faire détecter. Quoiqu’il en soit, la phénologie est assez nette, le passage étant régulier du 24/8 au 20/10, avec un dernier individu le 24/10. Le pic doit se situer à la mi-septembre, mais en l’absence de suivi du 7 au 17/9, difficile d’en dire plus. Un groupe inhabituellement grand (19 inds.) passe encore le 13/10.
  • Sterne naine (Little Tern): avec 186 individus, cette espèce peut être considérée comme migratrice régulière, en faibles effectifs, de fin juillet à fin octobre ou début novembre (un dernier oiseau est vu le 29/11, mais celui-ci n’était pas en migration active).
  • Sterne caugek (Sandwich Tern): près de 4’000 individus dénombrés, surtout de la mi-août à la mi-octobre, bien que le passage s’étale sur toute la saison: déjà fin juillet, des petits groupes sont notés, mais à partir de novembre il devient de plus en plus difficile de faire la part entre migrateurs actifs et oiseaux partant vers les reposoirs ou les sites de nourrissage situés plus au SW du Calao.

SandwichTern_2017_chart

  • Sterne voyageuse (Lesser Crested Tern): les premiers oiseaux sont vus dans la première décade d’août qui marque le début du passage régulier, qui s’étale jusqu’à la mi-novembre. Comme pour l’espèce précédente, il est parfois difficile de distinguer entre oiseaux en migration active et hivernants locaux. En effet, entre deux et cinq oiseaux fréquentent régulièrement la baie de Ngor dès le mois de septembre. Le très modeste pic du passage semble se situer dans la dernière décade de septembre.
  • Sterne royale “africaine” (African Royal Tern): très régulière mais rarement vue en nombres importants, cette sterne est vue tout au long de la saison, mais dès début octobre le passage ralentit fortement pour ne concerner plus que quelques individus (là aussi, il a souvent été difficile de faire le tri entre locaux et migrateurs). Au nord de Dakar, cette espèce ne se reproduit que dans deux grandes colonies, soit celles de la Langue de Barbarie et du Banc d’Arguin.
  • Sterne caspienne (Caspian Tern): vue irrégulièrement: seulement douze données sur l’ensemble de la saison, pour un total de 31 oiseaux présumés migrateurs actifs (max. 12 le 18/9; les trois derniers individus n’étaient probablement pas des migrateurs). L’origine de ces oiseaux peut être européenne ou africaine.
  • Guifette noire (Black Tern): l’une des espèces les plus régulières, avec un “taux de présence” de 87%: elle a donc manqué à l’appel seulement lors de quelques sessions. Effectif maximal de 740 individus le 22/9, lorsque plusieurs milliers ont dû passer devant Dakar. A noter que j’ai entendu des migrateurs nocturnes à plusieurs reprises migrer au-dessus de la maison aux Almadies lors du pic de fin septembre. Une Guifette moustac (Whiskered Tern) est vue le 14/10, mais d’autres sont certainement passées inaperçues, tout comme quelques Guifettes leucoptères ont pu passer au milieu des noires.

BlackTern_2017_chart

Autres taxons

J’en ai déjà mentionné plusieurs ici, donc juste pour résumer voici les autres espèces vues en migration active devant Ngor:

Trois Hérons cendrés et deux pourprés passent le 24/9, alors que des Grandes Aigrettes (1 le 12/10, 5 le 31/10) étaient probablement des migratrices en escale (une Aigrette intermédiaire était également présente le 31/10). Un Balbuzard est noté en migration active le 5/10, tout comme un Busard des roseaux le 12/10, un Faucon crécerellette le 15, et des crécerelles le 27/10 (2 ind.) et le 20/11 (1 ind.). Une Tourterelle des bois passe devant le Calao le 5/9, puis il y a eu ce fameux Hibou des marais le 2/12. Peut-être l’espèce la plus insolite a été la Huppe fasciée, avec deux observations d’individus ayant le même comportement les 18 et 24/9: à chaque fois, je repère l’oiseau arrivant du N ou du NNE volant au-dessus de l’océan et se dirigeant vers Ngor. Seuls quelques Martinets noirs sont vus en tout début de saison (les 5 et 12/8), avec un probable Martinet pâle, vu la date, le 22/10. Quelques Bergeronnettes printanières sont vues ou entendues entre le 14 et le 28/10, alors qu’une Bergeronnette grise survole le site le 30/11. Et enfin deux passereaux en escale sur les rochers ou la petite plage du Calao: quatre Traquets motteux (16/10-29/11) et deux Rougequeues à front blanc (14 & 24/10).

 

Je doute fort que j’aurai le temps de refaire un tel suivi l’automne prochain… bien qu’avec un peu de renforts lors des périodes “stratégiques” il doit être possible de faire encore mieux que cette année. Pour l’instant, on va essayer de renforcer le suivi au printemps (fin février / fin mai) mais là non plus ce ne sera pas possible tout seul… avis aux amateurs!