Archive | Langue de Barbarie RSS for this section

Northern Senegal after the rains, 3-7 Oct. (Part II)

(continued from our first blog post on this road trip)

After leaving Gamadji Sare behind, we made our way towards Podor with a few stops en route. A nightjar sheltering from the heat (and predators) was flushed by Vieux near forêt de Golette, just minutes after he casually mentioned that those bushes look good for nightjars! We were hoping for one of the rarer species of course, but it turned out to be a Longtailed Nightjar after all, apparently a (young?) bird in very fresh plumage. Also several Knob-billed Ducks here, a Short-toed Eagle, Spotted Thick-knee, Vieillot’s Barbet and so on.

LongtailedNightjar_Podor_20181005_IMG_3769

Long-tailed Nightjar / Engoulevent à longue queue

 

At the scenic Podor quay we had a Marsh Harrier, at least two House Martins and several Red-chested Swallows, some of which were on the opposite side of the river, meaning these were in Mauritanian territory: not insignificant since apparently there aren’t any solid records from our northern neighbour, despite the fact that the species surely must breed on the Mauritanian side of the Senegal delta. Just like in January, we also saw the species further downstream at Dagana. A Montagu’s Harrier and a Black Kite were seen just south of town.

Continuing our westbound journey, we cris-crossed the rice paddies with a few quick stops en route, including an emergency stop near Fanaye Dieri for a raptor which initially puzzled us both, and which turned out to be a young Beaudouin’s Snake-Eagle. This seems to be a (very) scarce wet season visitor to northern Senegal and to southern Mauritania where breeding has been confirmed.

BeaudouinsSnakeEagle_FanayeDieri_20181005_IMG_3787

Beaudouin’s Snake-Eagle / Circaète de Beaudouin

 

At Dagana, the main feature was the constant stream of herons and Long-tailed Cormorants en route to their nigh roost (or in case of the Black-crowned Night-Herons, en route to their nightly feeding grounds). The roost is located in the swamps just east of Dagana, and hosts what must be several thousands of birds. Three Glossy Ibises flew into Mauritania, while Greater Swamp Warblers were singing on the northern river bank. An evening walk produced Nightingale, Barn Owl, Long-tailed Nightjar and more.

 

Day 4: Big Day! Dagana to Saint-Louis via Richard Toll and the lower delta

October 6 happened to be the first “October Big Day” organised by Cornell – more on this eBird page.

Pre-breakfast birding at Bokhol “forest”, then from Dagana to Richard Toll with a couple of stops en route and a visit to the sand quarry where I wanted to check on the Blue-cheeked Bee-eater colony: with some 500 nest holes, probably at least half being active nests, this is an impressive sight. Bonus species here were Northern Anteater Chat, Cricket Warbler, and especially two Standard-winged Nightjars flushed from “broom bushes” which were a real surprise here (but once again both were female type… so alas no standards!). The picture of the quarry shows the habitat of the latter two species in the background. Along the track into the sugar cane plantations, more White-throated Bee-eaters, both bishops, Black-rumped Waxbills, and a fine Pin-tailed Whydah.

 

BluecheekedBeeeater-Colony_RichardToll_20181006_IMG_3819

Blue-cheeked Bee-eater colony at Richard Toll, with Cricket Warbler habitat in the background

 

PintailedWhydah_RichardToll_20181006_IMG_3851

Pin-tailed Whydah / Veuve dominicaine

 

But we’re getting ahead of ourselves… at Bokhol, the fields were rather quiet and unlike in Gamadji Sare the previous morning we barely had any northern songbirds. The forest held goodies such as Senegal Batis, more Orphean Warblers, Fork-tailed Drongo, Brubru, a Red-necked Falcon with prey, and a much less expected Klaas’s Cuckoo singing in the distance (appears to be a rare breeder during the wet season in northern Senegal). Full species list here. Another Whinchat and a few other migrants were seen just west of Dagana.

GreenBeeeater_Bokhol_20181006_IMG_3795

Green Bee-eater / Guêpier d’Orient at Bokhol

 

Psammophiselegans_Bokhol_20181006_IMG_3798

Elegant Sand Racer (Psammophis elegans), Bokhol

 

AfricanGroundSquirrel_Bokhol_20181006_IMG_3806

West African Ground Squirrel / Ecureuil fouisseur (Xerus erythropus)

 

Negotiating our way out of Richard Toll, we continued on to Ross Bethio, more specifically the ponds along the track to the Djoudj NP. This is where Vieux found a Lesser Jacana back in July: only the fifth record for the country (and second in the north), this was an exciting find of course, further highlighting the potential of this site which has received little attention from birders let alone from the National Park authorities – though the good news is that from this year on, the site is included in the monthly waterbird counts conducted by the Djoudj park staff. Full story on the jacana record on Ornithondar, merci Frédéric. During our visit there were loads of herons and whistling ducks, pelicans, several Black Storks and Yellow-billed Storks, more Eurasian Coots, etc. More unusually, we spotted several Marbled Ducks, counting at least 11 of these cool ducks. This appears to be an early date, and a rare record outside the nearby Djoudj NP: almost all observations tend to be from the same area in the national park, at the Grand Lac, typically between December and February. We’d already seen Little Grebes, but now Vieux also spotted a Black-necked Grebe, an adult coming out of its breeding plumage. Again an early date of an uncommon species in Senegal, typically seen in mid-winter in the north. All in all some 78 species were seen here, see eBird checklist.

The long drive through the delta along the Djoudj track was pretty uneventful, and we only stopped briefly at Saint-Louis to watch a group of Black-tailed Godwits which unfortunately were feeding knee-deep in the lagoon, so no colour-rings could be seen. The Saint-Louis sewage works are always a hit, but too often they are ignored by visiting and local birders alike: I was thus keen to show Vieux this site even if we had just about half an hour left. As always, plenty of birds here, best of all being a Great Reed Warbler. We said our goodbyes here, and I continued onto Zebrabar where I’d spend the night, picking up several wader species new for the trip list as well as Brown Babbler on the camp grounds.

BlackwingedKite_STEP-SaintLouis_20181006_IMG_3856

Black-winged Kite / Elanion blanc

 

Day 5: final bit of birding at Langue de Barbarie et Guembeul lagoons

Up before dawn, I first went to the floodplain south of Guembeul: Savile’s Bustards singing in all directions, a flock of spoonbills of both species frantically feeding, and a good mix of warblers (Melodious, Subalpine, Bonelli’s, Common Whitethroat). The lagoons held Avocets, Black-tailed Godwits (including a ringed bird from northern Germany), lots of Little Stints, Dunlins, Curlew Sandpipers, and so on. A Pallid Swift was seen near Guembeul, and the lagoons near the STEP held a handful of Shovelers and White-faced Whistling-Ducks, including a family with some 11 ducklings, with Little Grebes also showing signs of local breeding.

SpurwingedLapwing_Gandiol_20181007_IMG_3886

Spur-winged Lapwing chick / poussin de Vanneau éperonné

 

Time to head back home… uneventful drive, with just a few quick stops between Mouit and Louga whenever I encountered vultures such as this one:

RuppellsVulture_Louga_20181007_IMG_3907

Rüppell’s Vulture / Vautour de Rüppell

 

 

 

Advertisements

Northern Senegal after the rains, 3-7 Oct. (Part I)

Ever since our first expedition to the Moyenne Vallée back in January I’ve been keen to return to this little-known part of Senegal, mainly to see whether our Horus Swifts would be still around and to find out what the rains season would bring here. Early October I had the chance to finally head back out there: here’s a glimpse of our five-day road trip to the Far North.

Where to start? We’ll take it in chronological order!

 

Day 1: Dakar to Lampsar lodge via Trois-Marigots

A pit stop at the lac Tanma bridge and a couple of brief stops at Mboro produced a few waders and Greater Swamp Warbler (niaye near the abandoned Hotel du Lac), African Swamphen and Levaillant’s Cuckoo (ponds at the start of the road to Diogo; Rousserolle des cannes, Talève d’Afrique, Coucou de Levaillant). From there it was pretty much non-stop all the way to the Trois-Marigots, an important wetland complex just past Saint-Louis. All lush and teeming with bird life following abundant rains in previous weeks, I could have easily spent half a day here but unfortunately could only spare a couple of hours before moving on to the Lampsar lodge.

Herons, egrets, ducks, waders, bishops and weavers were everywhere, many of them in full breeding attire and actively singing and displaying while Marsh Harriers (Busard des roseaux) were hunting over the wetlands. Two adult Eurasian Coots were the most unexpected species, and I already got a good flavour of things to come in the next few days: Spur-winged Geese flying around, noisy River Prinias everywhere, a distant singing Savile’s Bustard, lots of Collared Pratincoles, a BrubruWoodchat Shrike, etc. etc. (Oie-armée, Prinia aquatique, Outarde de Savile, Glaréole à collier, Brubru, Pie-grièche a tête rousse)

PurpleHeron_TroisMarigots_20181003_IMG_3345

Purple Heron / Heron pourpré

EurasianCoot_TroisMarigots_20181003_IMG_3351

Eurasian Coot / Foulque macroule

Just like at Trois-Marigots, Yellow-crowned and Northern Red Bishops were very active in the fields around the Lampsar lodge, where quite a few northern songbirds were noted during a short walk at dusk: Western Olivaceous Warbler, Common Redstart, Garden Warbler, White Wagtail and many Yellow Wagtails – at least 135 flying towards a night roost on the other side of the Lampsar river (Euplectes vorabé et monseigneur, Hypolais obscure, Rougequeue à front blanc, Fauvette des jardins, Bergeronnettes grises et printanières). The Lampsar lodge certainly seems like a good base to explore this part of the Senegal delta, being located close the Djoudj and other birding hotspots in the area.

Day 2: Ndiael, Richard-Toll, Thille Boubacar to Gamadji Sare

Two Black-crowned Cranes were calling opposite the lodge at dawn, while Greater Swamp Warbler was singing along the Lampsar; the rice paddies and surrounding farmland held Winding Cisticola, River Prinia, and several waders including Common Snipe (Grue couronnée, Rousserolle des cannes, Cisticole roussâtre, Prinia aquatique, Bécassine des marais).

GreaterBlueearedGlossyStarling_Lampsar_20181003_IMG_3372

Greater Blue-eared Glossy Starling / Choucador à oreillons bleus

But we were just warming up… time to get serious. Vieux Ngom joined me at Lampsar from where we set off for the Ndiaël fauna reserve. Vieux is one of Senegal’s most enthusiastic and skilled birders, based out of the Djoudj as an eco-guide and is a great companion in the field – it was an absolute pleasure to spend the next few days in his company!

So, the Réserve Spéciale de Faune de Ndiaël: I’d only visited a couple of times before, and this was my first visit during the rains. The usually barren plains and dry acacia scrub were now all green, full of water, ponds with water lilies, acacias blooming, dragonflies hunting and butterflies fluttering everywhere… and birds of course: several Egyptian and Spur-winged Geese, a Knob-billed Duck, hundreds of White-faced Whistling Ducks (and one Fulvous Whistling Duck), two distant Black Storks and a Black-headed Heron, a couple of European Turtle-Doves, vocal Woodland Kingfishers (Ouette d’Egypte, Oie-armée, Canard à bosse, Dendrocygnes veufs et fauves, Cigognes noires, Héron mélanocéphale, Tourterelle des bois, Martin-chasseur du Sénégal). More Collared Pratincoles, a Montagu’s Harrier, and as we were watching the ducks and waders near the marigot de (N)yéti Yone, Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse started to appear in small flocks, flying hurriedly over the plain (Glaréole à collier, Busard cendré, Ganga à ventre brun). On the way back along the track, a few of these birds were bathing and drinking from small roadside pools. Oh and sparrow-larks everywhere, mainly Chestnut-backed but also a few Black-crowned Sparrow-larks. Over a hundred Sand Martins were feeding over the plain, with several Common Swifts also passing through (Moinelettes à oreillons blancs et à front blanc, Hirondelle de rivage, Martinet noir).

ChestnutbelliedSandgrouse_Ndiael_20181004_IMG_3425

Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse / Ganga à ventre brun

WoodchatShrike_Ndiael_20181004_IMG_3381

Woodchat Shrike / Pie-grièche à tête rousse juv.

 

Next up: Richard Toll, where we paid a brief visit to the aerodrome area, known to attract some good species in winter but rarely visited at this time of the year (this actually applies to pretty much all sites we explored). Our first Southern Grey Shrikes were seen here, as were Green Bee-eater, Tree Pipit, Singing Bush-Lark, Chestnut-bellied Starling, and more (Pie-grièche méridionale, Guêpier de Perse, Pipit des arbres, Alouette chanteuse, Choucador à ventre roux).

Time to move on… with just 110 km to cover until Gamadji Sare, we could afford making a few more stops en route. First of all at the wetland past Thille Boubacar, where a quick scan from the bridge by Ndiayene Pendao produced two Egyptian Plovers (Pluvian). The pond on the other side of the river, which back in January had yielded quite a lot of good birds, was harder to access because its surrounding were all flooded, making it difficult to get decent views of the main water body. So no Pygmy Geese this time round. Several Black Herons and African Darters were around, while a European Pied Flycatcher and a few Subalpine Warblers were feeding in the acacia woodland (Héron ardoisé, Anhinga, Gobemouche noir, Fauvette passerinette).

PiedFlycatcher_NdiayenePendao_20181004_IMG_3454

European Pied Flycatcher / Gobemouche noir

An adult Short-toed Eagle was seen flying over the road, and a couple more stops produced our first Cricket Warblers of the trip, more singing Black-crowned Sparrow-larks, breeding Sudan Golden Sparrows, and Vieux was lucky to see a Fulvous Babbler (Circaète Jean-le-Blanc, Prinia à front écailleux, Moinelette à front blanc, Moineau doré, Cratérope fauve). Alas no Golden Nightjar which we searched for in an area where it is known to winter.

And at long last, we arrived at Gamadji Sare, just in time for another hour’s worth of birding – No Time to Loose! – and of course we were more than eager to find out whether those mystery swifts were still going to be around. I’d barely walked through the back door of the Jardins du Fouta hotel, and there they were: a handful of Horus Swifts were flying over the river, confirming our suspicions that the species is well established here and that our sightings from January (and Fred’s in February) were not of some vagrant groupe of birds. At least 10 birds were seen several times, often flying close to the cliff’s edge while calling excitedly, and entering disused Blue-cheeked Bee-eater nest holes as night was falling. Unlike in January, the bee-eater colony was in full swing, with dozens of birds noisily feeding young in and out of the nest holes.

Horus Swift: check!

Mission accomplished.

 

A short walk along the Doué river produced migrants such as Orphean and Bonelli’s Warblers, Pied and Spotted Flycatcher, and more Black Scrub Robins and Cricket Warblers (Fauvette orphée, Pouillot de Bonelli, Gobemouches noirs et gris, Agrobate podobé, Prinia à front écailleux).

Birding non-stop… what a day!

Day 3: Gamadji Sare, Podor and Dagana

Difficult for things to get even better than the previous day, right?

We spent some more time studying the swifts and observing their behaviour and trying to count them. Not an easy feat as the numbers kept fluctuating, with small groups appearing and disappearing constantly, and at one point there were some Pallid and Little Swifts mixed in with the Horus Swifts. In the end, we settled on a conservative minimum of about 45 birds, probably even more like 50 to 60! So more than double than our estimate in January. Trying to get some decent pictures proved to be even more difficult, most of my pictures resembling this:

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3595

Trust me it’s a Horus Swift

Or even this:

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3626

At least I got its shadow

More on the swifts may follow in an upcoming post. In any case, it’s pretty clear now that the species is well established and it would be surprising if they didn’t in fact breed here. And that other sites along the Senegal and Niger rivers and their tributaries are probably waiting to be discovered.

HorusSwift_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3651

At least 16 Horus Swifts are visible in this picture! (click to enlarge)

Further along the river bank we saw pretty much the same species as the previous evening, plus HamerkopLanner, Pallid SwiftGosling’s Bunting to name but a few (Ombrette, Lanier, Martinet pâle, Bruant d’Alexander).

WhitefrontedBeeeater_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3514

White-throated Bee-eater / Guêpier à gorge blanche

WhiteWagtail_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3567

White Wagtail / Bergeronnette grise

GoslingsBunting_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3611

Gosling’s Bunting/ / Bruant d’Alexander

A quick breakfast and some birding in the gardens which held Red-throated Bee-eater – just when we thought they were no longer around – and an unexpected Wryneck among many others; we then decided to go out to the rice paddies and the fields just to the north-east of the village (Guêpier à gorge rouge, Torcol fourmilier). Not really knowing what to expect, we weren’t disappointed: Bluethroat! Whinchat! Dwarf Bittern! …all species that in Senegal are tricky to see in one way or another (Gorgebleue à miroir, Tarier des prés, Blongios de Stürm!). The bittern was particularly cooperative: after it was accidentally flushed by Vieux, it landed on top of a bush, showing off its unique plumage – nice to finally catch up with this little beauty in Senegal (bringing my country list to 498 species!).

DwarfBittern_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3710

Dwarf Bittern / Blongios de Stürm

EurasianReedWarbler_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3750

Eurasian Reed Warbler / Rousserolle effarvatte

YellowcrownedBishop_GamadjiSare_20181005_IMG_3722

Yellow-crowned Bishop / Euplecte vorabé

All in all, we got to see no less than 90 species in a single morning, all within walking distance from the guesthouse: pretty impressive I say. See the complete eBird checklist here.

We were now half way through our little expedition so it was already time to return west, to Dagana via Podor. This section, as well as days 4 (Foret de Bokhol, Richard-Toll again, Ross Bethio to Gandiol) and 5 (Langue de Barbarie and the Gandiol area, back to Dakar) will be covered in an upcoming Part II of this post… Thanks for reading up to here!

 

 

Le PNOD, le PNLB, la RNICS & la RNP en images

Si vous arrivez à déchiffrer les acronymes du titre, alors chapeau! Faute d’un meilleur intitulé pour ce billet, et faute de temps pour écrire un long article sur tout ce qu’on a pu voir ces huit derniers jours, je vous présente ici quelques images prises lors de notre virée dans le Djoudj (le PNOD – parc national des oiseaux du Djoudj), le PN de la Langue de Barbarie (PNLB), la réserve naturelle d’intérêt communautaire de la Somone (RNCIS), et la réserve de Popenguine (RNP). Huit jours a se ressourcer en pleine nature, en agréable compagnie de nos amis Jan, Maria, Kajsa et Marnix venus découvrir le Sénégal – le bonheur.

PNOD

A commencer par ces Courvites isabelles vus vers le Grand Mirador du PNOD, trouvés par l’excellent guide Vieux Ngom (qui en passant salue toute l’équipe de Genevois!), dans une atmosphère poussiéreuse comme je l’ai rarement vue. Les courvites aussi j’en avais rarement vus, même jamais en fait! Belle coche donc pour commencer les vacances de fin d’année, d’une espèce régulière dans le nord du pays mais qui jusqu’ici m’avait toujours échappée, ici comme ailleurs d’ailleurs.

CreamcolouredCourser_Djoudj_20171223_IMG_6997

Cream-coloured Courser / Courvite isabelle

Voici pour vous faire une idée des conditions météo, qui se résument tout simplement en “vent + froid + sable + poussière”, mais que notre ami d’Ornithondar a très bien expliqué ici. Jamais eu aussi froid au Sénégal… A peine 15 degrés au petit matin… suffisamment peu pour justifier au moins trois couches pour sortir.

LacTantale_Djoudj_20171223_IMG_6899

Aussi vus dans le Djoudj, dans le désordre: les habituelles Grues couronnées, une ou deux Talèves d’Allen, deux couples d’Anserelles naines, Sarcelles d’hiverPie-grièches méridionales, Glaréoles à collier, Tarier d’Afrique, Prinia aquatiquePygargue vocifère, Fauvette orphée, Alouettes calandrelles, et j’en passe. (Pygmy-Goose, Common Teal, Southern Grey Shrike, Collared Pratincole, African Stonechat, River Prinia, African Fish Eagle, Orphean Warbler, Short-toed Lark). Par contre peu de canards et très mauvaise visibilité sur le Grand Lac, mais Jean-Louis et Maha ont tout de même eu quelques Sarcelles marbrées deux jours plus tard, tout comme l’Outarde arabe et plein d’autres choses (Marbled Teal, Arabian Bustard).

Mais aussi Loup africain, Phacochères à volonté, un Crocodile du Nil, et pas moins de trois Pythons de Seba pour le grand bonheur de tout le monde mais peut-être surtout pour mes amis Jean-Louis et Maha, à peine arrivés au Sénégal.

Warthog_Djoudj_20171223_IMG_6898

Warthog / Phaco

AfricanRockPython_Djoudj_20171223_IMG_6891

African Rock Python / Python de Seba

PNLB

Passons maintenant au PNLB, ou l’on a passe deux nuits dans notre lodge favori au Senegal: le Zebrabar, niche entre lagunes et ocean, un petit havre de paix qui invite à la relaxation et au far niente… si ce n’était pour tous les oiseaux qu’il y a à découvrir! Même le jour de Noël on ne chôme pas, bien au contraire: en fin de matinee je passe d’abord à la STEP de St. Louis qui comme toujours grouille d’oiseaux, dont le Prinia aquatique, la Rousserolle des canes, plusieurs centaines de Dendrocygnes veufs et fauves tout comme quelques Canards souchets, et une bonne diversité de limicoles (River Prinia, Greater Swamp Warbler, White-faced & Fulvous Whistling-Ducks, Northern Shoveler). Mais surtout, je tombe sur une belle surprise sous la forme d’une Marouette de Baillon que je lève en bordure du sentier entre les deux plans d’eau principaux. Et que j’aurai ensuite le plaisir d’observer et de photographier pendant plus d’une demie heure – quel bonheur! Seulement ma deuxième obs de l’espèce, mais bien meilleure que la première, il y a près de 10 ans aux Pays-Bas.

BaillonsCrake_STEP-StLouis_20171225_IMG_7134

Baillon’s Crake / Marouette de Baillon

BaillonsCrake_STEP-StLouis_20171225_IMG_7088

Baillon’s Crake / Marouette de Baillon

Au retour de la STEP, brève escale au bord de la piste qui mène au Niokobokk: une Pie-grièche mériodionale (ou doit-on dire Pie-grièche du désert maintenant? voir cet article sur Ornithondar). J’essaierai de revenir sur la question des (sous-)espèces en 2018…

SouthernGreyShrike_Gandiol__20171225_IMG_7170

Southern Grey Shrike / Pie-grieche méridionale

En fin d’après-midi, je pars dans la plaine et la brousse derrière Mouit, là où j’avais eu entre autres Outarde de Savile, Coucou-geai, Oedicnème tacheté et cie. lors de mes précédentes visites. Parcourant la steppe à la recherche de fauvettes (le site me semble idéal pour la Fauvette à lunettes notamment) ou autres pipits, je tombe sur ce Hibou des marais – le sixième au moins depuis début novembre au Sénégal, confirmant ainsi le petit (?) afflux qui a visiblement lieu encore en ce moment. Combien passent inaperçus? J’ai donc une fois de plus dû mettre à jour l’article que j’y avais consacré il y a quelques semaines, avec l’image en plus et quelques obs supplémentaires (dont une de la lagune de Somone).

ShortearedOwl_Gandiol_20171225_IMG_7228

Short-eared Owl / Hibou des marais

Ci-dessous le biotope:

Gandiol_20171225_IMG_7240

RNICS

Ensuite, après un crochet par Lompoul (Outarde de Savile, Oedicneme tacheté, Petit Moineau, Guêpier d’Orient et j’en passe; Savile’s Bustard, Spotted Thick-knee, Bush Petronia, Little Green Bee-eater), on pose les valises au Dalaal Diam près de la lagune de Somone.

Là, j’en profite pour retourner dans mon coin à Engoulevents à balanciers: rien vu! Ils ont dû repartir sous d’autres cieux. Curieusement, comme en octobre, une Bondrée (Honey Buzzard) me passe par-dessus la tête en filant vers le sud. Vu le plumage c’était un autre individu qu’en octobre, un jeune individu assez roux. Et à la place des Petits-ducs africains, cette fois ce sont au moins deux Chevêchettes perlées (Pearl-spotted Owlet) qui se font entendre de nuit (et parfois de jour) dans le jardin du lodge. Une Cigogne noire (Black Stork) survole le site, un Busard cendré chasse en bordure de la lagune, des centaines de Moineaux dorés du Soudan se mêlent aux Travailleurs a bec rouge et autres tisserins. Et curieusement toujours, je trouve deux Hypolaïs pâles (Eastern Olivaceous Warbler) non loin de la zone où j’avais déjà observé cette espèce peu connue en Sénégambie, en mars 2016. Hiverneraient-ils dans le secteur? Les deux oiseaux évoluaient ensemble et étaient peut-être en couple, à moins qu’il ne s’agisse de deux mâles se disputant un buisson stratégique… Quoiqu’il en soit, l’identification était relativement simple car les deux oiseaux hochaient activement la queue tout en ouvrant les ailes vers le bas, et la structure (notamment le bec plus fin) et les critères du plumage concordent; le chant semblait aussi assez différent de l’Hypolaïs obscure – je dois encore traiter et analyser les quelques prises de son, qui je l’espère ne seront pas trop affectés par le vent.

EasternOlivaceousWarbler_Guereo_20171228_IMG_7418

Eastern Olivaceous Warbler / Hypolaïs pâle

EasternOlivaceousWarbler_Guereo_20171228_IMG_7431

Eastern Olivaceous Warbler / Hypolaïs pâle

RNP

Point de photos de Popenguine à part un jeune Circaète Jean-le-Blanc (Short-toed Eagle) un peu flou, mais à signaler notamment neuf ou dix Hirondelles de rochers (Crag Martin), deux Monticoles bleus (Blue Rock Thrush), quelques discrets Bruants d’Alexander (Gosling’s Bunting), 4-5 Beaumarquets melba, 2-3 Sporopipes quadrillés (Speckle-fronted Weaver). Visite depuis Guéréo, hier matin 29/12. Au retour, on passe par le Lac Rose, ce qui permet d’ajouter le Goéland d’Audouin à la liste.

Voilà pour ce tour d’horizon, pas si rapide finalement.

Prochaine expédition: la moyenne vallée du fleuve, dans une semaine à peine. Avant cela, on va essayer de profiter des quelques jours de congés restants pour passer au Technopole, les steppes du Lac Rose ou encore la lagune de Yene.

 

 

Langue de Barbarie & Gandiol, 10-12/9

Le long weekend de la Tabaski, nous l’avons passé au Zebrabar, l’occasion de découvrir le parc national de la Langue de Barbarie et “l’arrière-pays” du Gandiolais en saison d’hivernage.

Pas trop le temps d’un long récit, même si comme toujours il y avait plein de choses à voir; la liste complète se trouve en bas de l’article. 124 espèces en tout! Je vous présente donc rapidement quelques photos, à commencer par ces magnifiques Guêpiers de Perse, espèce particulièrement commune en ce moment. Plusieurs familles sont vues, dont celle-ci avec 2-3 jeunes encore nourris par les parents, que Theo et moi avons pu observer pendant de longues minutes. Les adultes apportaient surtout sinon exclusivement des libellules, pour la plupart de taille moyenne genre Sympetrum.

bluecheekedbeeeater_pnlb_20160911_img_5175_edited

Blue-cheeked Bee-eater / Guêpier de Perse ad. et juv.

Et les jeunes:

bluecheekedbeeeater_pnlb_20160911_img_5185_edited         bluecheekedbeeeater_pnlb_20160911_img_5178_edited

Dans la zone se trouvait également l’une des trois Pie-grièches à tête rousse observées pendant le weekend, une jeune de l’année au plumage bien terne comparée aux adultes:

woodchatshrike_pnlb_20160911_img_5167_edited

Woodchat Shrike / Pie-grièche à tête rousse juv.

A la station de lagunage de Saint-Louis, cet adulte d’Epervier shikra est resté posé dans un arbre sec alors que je passais à côté: ce n’est que plus tard en passant en revue les photos que j’ai constaté qu’il tenait dans ses serres une queue de reptile, apparemment un serpent voire un scinque.

shikra_stlouis_20160910_img_5150_edited

Shikra / Epervier shikra ad. avec proie

Au même endroit, comme toujours les Prinias aquatiques se faisaient entendre et pour une fois aussi bien voir et photographier. Espèce assez peu documentée, ces quelques photos d’un même individu chanteur montrent bien la couleur froide et globalement très grise du plumage comparée au Prinia modeste, aussi les lores noires, mais pour le reste c’est difficile! Heureusement que le chant des deux espèces est assez différent. Le plumage étant tellement proche, l’identification des oiseaux silencieux est généralement impossible, d’autant plus que le Prinia modeste a un plumage assez variable, et certains individus sont très gris notamment en période de reproduction. Bien que l’aquatique ait une nette preference pour les roselières, les deux espèces peuvent se côtoyer dans la même zone comme c’est justement le cas de la station de lagunage: Prinia aquatique dans la roselière et aux abords immédiats des plans d’eau, le cousin modeste dans les zones plus sèches et dans les haies bordant les champs.

riverprinia_stlouis_20160910_img_5139_edited
riverprinia_stlouis_20160910_img_5141_edited   riverprinia_stlouis_20160910_img_5138_edited

Dans l’arrière-pays, je tombe sur ce groupe de Barges à queue noire en train de se nourrir frénétiquement dans une mosaïque de mares temporaires, entre tamaris et acacias. Deux oiseaux avec des bagues couleurs se tiennent parmi elles, alors qu’une troisième barge baguée, elle aussi aux Pays-Bas, est vue le lendemain dans une autre (?) troupe d’une bonne centaine d’oiseaux.

blacktailedgodwit_gandiol_20160911_img_5242_edited

La Barge rousse, bien moins fréquente, est présente dans les lagunes saumâtres du parc même. En tout, pas moins de 24 espèces de limicoles sont observés pendant notre séjour, auxquelles ont peut encore ajouter le Vanneau à tête noire vu à plusieurs reprises pendant le trajet.

bartailedgodwit_pnlb_20160912_img_5236_edited

Bar-tailed Godwit / Barge rousse

Retour dans la brousse, où ce Coucou-geai a bien voulu poser (au loin!) à côté d’un Rollier d’Abyssinie. Un autre individu sera vu le 12/9 peu après le départ pour Dakar, près de Gandiol.

greatspottedcuckoo_gandiol_20160911_img_5265_edited

Great Spotted Cuckoo / Coucou-geai

Non loin de là, j’ai le plaisir de découvrir un chant unique que je ne connaissais pas encore, et il m’a fallu un moment pour repérer la source: une Outarde de Savile posée a l’ombre d’un acacia avant de disparaître en douce dans la brousse. Sans aucun doute l’un des points forts du weekend! Cette petite outarde sahélienne serait encore bien répandue dans la moitie nord du pays, bien qu’on la trouve aussi ça et là sur la Petite Côte et dans le Saloum. J’avais eu l’occasion de la voir aux Trois-Marigots en mai 2014, mais plus rien depuis. Ici, au moins trois mâles se répondaient par leur chant résonnant et surtout étonnant pour une espèce autrement très discrète, que je vous laisse découvrir comme d’habitude sur xeno-canto. Même le rendu visuel du chant est joli!

sonogram_savilesbustard_gandiol_20160911

Sonogramme du chant de l’Outarde de Savile

Une heure plus tard dans le même coin c’est un TUII-ti qui se fait entendre: le cri de contact (ou est-ce une variation du chant?) de l’Outarde de Savile. C’est alors que je me suis souvenu d’un cri enregistré il y a quelques mois dans la lagune de la Somone et que j’avais par erreur attribué au Courvite de Temminck qui passait en vol au même moment… correction faite! Au moins une autre outarde est entendue le lendemain matin au sud du village de Mouït.

Toujours dans cette zone, un autre cri particulier attire mon attention: au moins une Fauvette de Moltoni! Details à suivre, mais il s’agirait d’une rare mention sénégalaise bien que ce taxon récemment élevé au rang d’espèce hiverne probablement de maniere régulière dans le Sahel occidental.

Les rolliers locaux sont actuellement en pleine mue, notamment des couvertures alaires, des scapulaires et des rectrices externes. L’absence de ces dernières leur confère d’ailleurs une allure de Rollier d’Europe assez déroutante, mais notez les secondaires bleues et non noires et la face plus blanche au moins chez les adultes. De plus, selon la position de l’oiseau et selon l’état d’avancement de la mue, on voit parfois les nouvelles rectrices partiellement cachées sous le reste de la queue, comme c’est le cas sur l’oiseau de la photo du Coucou-geai.

abyssinianroller_gandiol_20160910_img_5125_edited

Abyssinian Roller / Rollier d’Abyssinie

Sinon pour le reste, je vous laisse juger à partir de la liste complète disponible ici en format PDF.

 

 

Trip up North: Gandiol & the “PNLB” (30/3-3/4)

Last week’s school holidays and a cancelled road trip to the Gambia and Casamance (border closed to road traffic!) were a perfect opportunity to return to the Gandiol area, just south of Saint-Louis. We first stayed a couple of nights at the pleasant Niokobokk guest house, then 2 nights camping at our favourite Zebrabar. Rather than writing a long report, here’s an overview in pictures, in chronological order:

Thursday 31/3

  • Acacia bush between Gandiol village and Niokobokk: a Brubru (more heard than seen), a Yellow-billed Oxpecker feeding between a donkey’s ears, a busy pair of Northern Crombecs, 1 or 2 Woodchat Shrikes, numerous Common Whitethroats, several Common Redstarts, etc.
NorthernCrombec_Gandiol_IMG_2738_edited

Northern Crombec eating ants / Crombec sittelle mangeant des fourmis

Yellow-billedOxpecker_Gandiol_IMG_2731_edited.jpg

Yellow-billed Oxpecker on a donkey’s head / Piqueboeuf à bec jaune sur la tête d’un âne

 

  • Niokobokk: A probable Iberian Chiffchaff in the garden of the guest house. Poor picture, but the well marked supercilium, whitish belly, pale legs (compared to Common Chiffchaff), shortish primary projection (compared to Willow Warbler) are more or less visible here. Unfortunately this bird didn’t call or sing, so I’m not 100% certain about this bird’s ID even if plumage, location and date all point in the Iberian direction.
IberianChiffchaff_Gandiol_IMG_2750_edited.jpg

Probable Iberian Chiffchaff / Pouillot ibérique

VitellineMaskedWeaver_Gandiol_IMG_2771_edited.jpg

Black-headed Weaver / Tisserin à tête noire

 

  • Guembeul reserve: Daniel, Charlie and I paid an afternoon visit to Guembeul, where we were met by local guide Pape who just like on our first visit last year was very enthusiastic and obviously quite knowledgeable about the area’s bird- and wildlife. Of interest were +250 Avocets, a single Lesser Flamingo, +60 Greater Flamingos, 2 Little Terns… but also Warthog, Patas Monkey, Striped Ground Squirrel on the mammal front.

Friday 1/4

  • An entire morning out in the field with Frédéric Bacuez, Saint-Louis resident (well, almost!) birder and blogger, was undoubtedly the highlight of the trip. Fred’s knowledge of the birdlife and more generally of the biodiversity, geography and culture of the region is unique, making it was most definitely a privilege to be out birding together. Even more so because our excursion was highly successful in finding our main target: the little-known and elusive Little Grey Woodpecker, of which Fred recently found an active nest in an impressive baobab, somewhere in the “arrière-pays gandiolais” south of the Guembeul special fauna reserve. His blog Ornithondar contains a number of posts on this find, including a comprehensive report of our excursion together. It only took a short wait for the tiny Sahelian Woodpeckers as they are sometimes called to appear near their favourite tree.
Little Grey Woodpecker / Pic gris

Male Little Grey Woodpecker / Pic gris mâle

We enjoyed watching, photographing and recording a fine adult male with a female or young bird, staying closely together while feeding in the acacia trees. After a while, the latter flew onto the branch containing the nest hole. As it approached, just before entering the cavity, another young or female left the nest: it seems that the local family continues using their nest hole even after the young have fledged.

LittleGreyWoodpecker_Gandiolais_IMG_2855

Female-type Little Grey Woodpecker near nest / Pic gris type femelle, près du nid

 

A recording of the male calling loud & clear followed by constant softer contact (or begging?) calls is available on Xeno-canto. Seems that my recording is the only one that is publicly available, as the species was so far not represented in the extensive sound library, neither is it available in the AVoCet nor the Macaulay libraries.

A supporting act of various Palearctic passerines – Common Whitethroats everywhere, a single Subalpine Warbler, Orphean Warbler, Common Redstart, Bonelli’s Warbler – and a few “good” local species – Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse, Little Tern (a presumed pair performing their aerial display), Little Green Bee-eater, Senegal Batis – further made our mourning out all the more enjoyable. A quick stop at the sewage ponds on the way back from Saint-Louis added a few more to the list, in particular River Prinia and Greater Swamp Warbler.

RufousScrubRobin_Gandiol_IMG_2868_edited.jpg

“African” Scrub-Robin / Agrobate “mineur” (ssp. minor, sometimes split from Rufous Scrub-Robin)

 

Saturday 2/4

  • Parc National de la Langue de Barbarie (aka PNLB): the usual suspects around Zebrabar: a good diversity of waders of all sorts (Oystercatcher, Grey PloverCurlew Sandpiper, Little Stint, Curlew and Whimbrel, etc.), noisy Royal, Caspian, Gull-billed, Sandwich and Common Terns; Slender-billed, Grey-headed and Lesser Black-backed Gulls; Brown Babbler; Western Olivaceous WarblerLittle Weaver.
LittleGreenBee-eater_PNLB_IMG_2958_edited

Little Green Bee-eater / Guêpier d’Orient

 

  • Gandiolais bush east of Mouit village: a late afternoon visit produced another Orphean Warbler, at least a dozen or so Common Whitethroats feeding for the most part on “prickly pear cactus” (Barbary Fig), more Sudan Golden Sparrows, and so on.
SudanGoldenSparrow_Gandiolais_IMG_2980_edited.jpg

Sudan Golden Sparrow / Moineau doré du Soudan

 

Sunday 3/4

  • A quick early morning walk around Zebrabar produced more of the same, plus an adult Peregrine Falcon (one of very few raptors seen in the area), another White Wagtail, more Senegal Batises, and a Bar-tailed Godwit to mention but a few.

 

  • The return journey to Dakar took us once again through vulture country: from Potou to roughly Mboro, sightings of Hooded, White-backed and to a lesser extent Ruppell’s Vultures were fairly regular albeit in small numbers. Also seen were a roadside European Roller – a nice change from the common Abyssinian Roller – and several Mottled Spinetails between Kebemer and Mboro. A quick stop near one of the small Mboro lakes, pictured below, provided a snapshot of the potential of this area which I hope to explore more in coming weeks or months: an impressive density of African Swamphen, African Jacana, and Moorhen was remarkable, while a White-faced Whistling Duck, a pair of Little Grebes, an Intermediate Egret, Squacco Heron, a Black-headed Heron, Black-winged Stilt, Wood Sandpiper, and Palm Swift added more flavour. The Black-headed Heron was all the more surprising as this was the 2nd of the trip, after one flying over the new Lompoul road on our way northward, while the species is not known to regularly occur in the Niayes stretch between Dakar and the Senegal River. Also on the way up on 30/3, a pair of Bearded Barbets near Gokho village (north of Lac Tanma) was of interest as there are apparently few records this far north.

Mboro_IMG_3012

All in all, about 135 bird species were seen during this trip, once again confirming the sheer diversity of this part of Senegal.

 

Virée dans le delta: Langue de Barbarie et Djoudj

C’est en famille et avec des amis en visite que nous sommes partis passer quelques jours dans la région de Saint Louis, dont voici en quelques lignes et photos un rapide compte-rendu.

Apres une nuit dans le « désert » (lire : dunes) de Lompoul – peu d’oiseaux, mais des paysages spectaculaires – nous avons fait une escale de deux nuits au Zebrabar, établissement bien sympa et idéalement situé à côté de l’entrée du Parc national de la Langue de Barbarie. Notre troisième visite ici, et à chaque fois l’accueil par Ursula et Martin est chaleureux et les oiseaux sont au rendez-vous.

Dans les lagunes saumâtres autour du campement et entre Guembeul et Ndiebene-Gandiol ce sont des centaines voire milliers de limicoles occupés à se nourrir dans la vase : Huîtrier pie, Echasse, Avocette élégante, Barge rousse, Courlis cendre et corlieu, Bécasseaux variable, minute, cocorli, sanderling, TournepierreChevaliers stagnatile, aboyeur, gambette, guignette, Grand Gravelot, Pluvier argenté, et bien sur les omniprésents Vanneaux éperonnés et Œdicnèmes du Sénégal. La densité de Balbuzards est impressionnante en ce moment, avec parfois 3-4 oiseaux vus simultanément, l’un posé par terre, l’autre transportant un poisson ou encore en train de cercler au-dessus du fleuve. L’éco-volontaire du parc nous explique qu’il y a près de 300 individus dans le secteur ! Sur l’île aux oiseaux, ce sont essentiellement les Mouettes à tête grise qui nichent a cette saison, et quelques Sternes caspiennes et royales, ces dernières arrivant en masse plus tard dans la saison.

 

GreyheadedGull_LanguedeBarbarie_IMG_1314

Grey-headed Gull / Mouette à tête grise

 

Des Fauvettes passerinettes un peu partout dans les buissons, une unique Grisette, ici et là une Hypolaïs obscure (souvent en plein chant), des Pouillots véloce et de Bonelli, un Rougequeue à front blanc, etc. Quelques Bergeronnettes printanières et grises, deux Hirondelles rustiques et trois Tourterelles des bois longeant la rive complètent le tableau des migrateurs paléarctiques.

A la station de lagunage au nord de Guembeul, il y a comme toujours du monde : la petite vasière entre la route et les bassins grouille de Barges à queue noire et Echasses, Combattants, un Gravelot pâtre, des chevaliers de toutes sortes, alors qu’il y a au moins 500 Dendrocygnes veufs dans les bassins. Parmi eux, une poignée de Sarcelles d’été et une douzaine de Souchets. Les Chevaliers sylvains s’envolent à droite et à gauche, les Garde-bœufs nous ignorent.

Pas le temps de s’aventurer dans la réserve de Guembeul cette fois, mais une sortie matinale en bord de lagune le long de la piste de Rao (avant le village de Toug) permet de bien observer aussi bien l’Agrobate roux que l’Agrobate podobé, et notamment de comparer leur chant si similaire – plus lent et moins complexe pour le premier, plus mélodieux et varie pour le second. Pas mal de vent ces jours donc pas l’idéal pour les enregistrements, mais vous trouverez des prises de son ici et ici respectivement. A part les Cochevis huppes, deux-trois Traquets motteux et une solitaire Moinelette à oreillons blancs peu d’oiseaux s’activent dans la plaine, mais au loin ce sont une centaine de Flamants roses, Spatules blanches et divers ardéidés qui attirent l’attention.

Il est temps d’avancer, cette fois ce sont deux nuits dans le fameux parc national du Djoudj que nous allons passer. Malgré les menaces qui pèsent sur ce site inscrit au patrimoine de l’Humanité et les problèmes de gestion – et surtout de ressources – le déplacement en vaut la peine (à ce propos, voir le récent article sur le blog ornithondar).

Djoudj_floodplain_IMG_1497

Le spectacle des Pélicans blancs bien sûr, mais surtout celui de voir des milliers et des milliers de canards de surface sur le Grand Lac : le gros des effectifs est composé des Pilets, Souchets, Sarcelles d’été et Dendrocygnes veufs (+ quelques fauves), mais là, coup de chance, 3 Sarcelles marbrées pas trop loin devant l’un des observatoires ! Sur le Lac de Khar ce sont quelques Ouettes d’Egypte – espèce curieusement localisée au Sénégal – et des Oies-armées de Gambie qui s’ajoutent à la liste de palmipèdes

Djoudj_watchtower_IMG_1518

La liste complète est bien sûr trop longue pour énumérer ici – près de 115 espèces observées en tout – donc voici les autres « highlights » de notre bref séjour dans le Djoudj, dans le désordre :

  • Un mâle adulte de Faucon crécerellette
  • Une Bécassine sourde levée dans la zone à l’est de l’hôtel du Djoudj
  • Trois Rhynchées peintes près de l’embarcadère
  • Deux Grues couronnées près du Grand Lac et les quelques miliers de Flamants nains et roses.
  • Une Cigogne noire se nourrissant parmi une flopée de Spatules (beaucoup de ces dernières sont baguées d’ailleurs, mais pas de télescope pour relever les codes !)
  • Les Glaréoles à collier, d’abord une troupe d’une quarantaine dissimulées dans le bassin près de la Station biologique, ensuite un individu seul près du Grand Lac (photo prise par Jane ci-dessous)
  • Les innombrables Pouillots véloces, Phragmites des joncs et Fauvettes passerinettes partout dans les buissons, notamment dans le secteur de Gainthe et autour de l’entrée du parc. Comme à Gandiol, les quelques Hypolaïs obscures chantent de maniere assidue alors que lesRougequeues a front blanc se font plus discrets.
  • Et bien sur les rencontres avec les Loups africains, Phacochères communs, les Singes “rouges” (les Patas), Crocodiles du Nil et Varans ouest-africains.

 

Photos ci-dessous: Glaréole à collier / Collared Pratincole; casseau minute / Little Stint; Varan ouest-africain / West African Monitor

CollaredPratincole_Djoudj_IMG_1508

LittleStint_Djoudj_IMG_1538

MonitorLizzard_Djoudj_IMG_1489