Archive | Satus & Distribution RSS for this section

Technopole update, Lac Rose & more

MediterraneanGull_Technopole_20180205_IMG_9041

Lots going on at Technopole at the moment, and hardly any time to write… pretty much as usual.

So here’s a quick update and a few pics, starting with some of the highlights:

  • The two obliging Buff-breasted Sandpipers are still present, seen each time in the area behind the fishermen’s cabin. The country’s 7th or 8th record, and also by far the longest staying birds.
BuffbreastedSandpiper_Technopole_20180205_IMG_9113

Buff-breasted Sandpiper / Becasseau rousset

  • This may be getting boring now and a bit of a déjà-vu, but yet again a Lesser Yellowlegs showed up in Dakar. This one was photographed on 8/2/18 by J. Dupuy and posted on observation.org; as far as I know this is the 8th record for Senegal and the third for Technopole (after singles in August 2015 and January 2016). Yesterday morning, a visit with French birders Gabriel and Etienne allowed us to relocate the bird, a very nice adult coming into breeding plumage:
LesserYellowlegs_Technopole_20180219_IMG_9570

Lesser Yellowlegs / Chevalier a pattes jaunes

  • Almost just as good, and another first for Technopole (232 species on the list now), was this Common Shelduck – not totally unexpected given the small influx that took place this winter, but still a very good record and always nice to see this pretty duck showing up on my local patch. Unlike its name suggests, it’s definitely not common in Senegal, as there appear to be only about nine previous (published) records, two of which were also obtained this winter.
CommonShelduck_Technopole_20180219_IMG_9541

Common Shelduck / Tadorne de Belon

  • Along the same lines, another scarce species showed up at Technopole recently, possibly still the same as the one I saw at the end of December: a Jack Snipe on 12 & 19/2. Only a few Garganeys are present at the moment, but Northern Shovelers are still numerous these days. At east three Eurasian Teal were with the preceding species (two males on 27/10, and a pair on 10/2).
  • Remember that influx of Short-eared Owls? Well it looks like it’s not finished yet, with the discovery of no less than seven (maybe even more!) Short-eared Owls roosting together, on 3/2, by Edgar and Jenny Ruiz (at least two birds were still in the same place on 18/2).

Switching categories now – ring reading! Even with such a diversity and sheer numbers of ducks, waders, terns, gulls to go through, we’re still paying attention to ringed birds. And making very modest contributions to our knowledge of migration strategies, survival rates, and much more – one bird at a time. Since the start of the year we’ve been able to read about 50 rings of more than 40 different birds, mostly Audouin’s, Lesser Black-backed and Slender-billed Gulls, but also a few more original species:

  • The flock of 170-180 Avocets that are still present contains at least two colour-ringed birds, both from SW Spain where they were ringed as chicks in… 2005! That’s nearly 13 years for both birds – a respectable age, though it seems that this species can live way longer that that: the record for a British (& Irish) Avocet is nearly 24 years (impressive… though not quite as much as a that 40-year old Oystercatcher!). Interestingly, “RV2” had already been seen at Technopole five years ago, by Simon, but no other sightings are known for this bird.
  • A few Black-tailed Godwits are still around though the majority has now moved on to the Iberian Peninsula from where they will continue to their breeding grounds in NW Europe. Reading rings has been difficult recently as birds tend to either feed in deeper water, or are simply too far to be read. This one below is “G2GCCP”, a first-winter bird that hatched last spring in The Netherlands and which will likely spend its first summer here in West Africa.  Note the overall pale plumage and plain underparts compared to the adult bird in the front, which has already started moulting into breeding plumage.
BlacktailedGodwit_Technopole_20180205_IMG_9159

Black-tailed Godwit / Barge a queue noire

  • Mediterranean Gulls are again relatively numerous this winter, with some 8-10 birds so far. As reported earlier, one bird was ringed: Green RV2L seen on 21 & 27/1, apparently the first French Med Gull to be recovered in Senegal.
  • The Caspian Tern “Yellow AV7” is probably a bird born in the Saloum delta in 2015 – awaiting details.
  • The regular Gull-billed Tern U83, ringed as a chick in 2009 in Cadiz province, seems to be pretty faithful to Technopole: after four sightings last winter, it’s again seen on most visits since the end of January.

A morning out to Lac Rose on 11/2 with visiting friends Cyril and Gottlieb was as always enjoyable, with lots of good birds around:

  • The first Temminck’s Courser of the morning was a bird flying over quite high, uttering its typical nasal trumpeting call. The next four were found a little further along, while yet another four birds were flushed almost from under the car, allowing for a few decent pictures:
TemmincksCourser_LacRose_20180211_IMG_9295

Temminck’s Courser / Courvite de Temminck

TemmincksCourser_LacRose_20180211_IMG_9298

Temminck’s Courser / Courvite de Temminck

  • The now expected Greater Short-toed Larks were not as numerous as last year, with a few dozen birds seen, sometimes side by side with Tawny Pipit. No Isabelline nor any Black-eared Wheatears this time round, but one of the Northern Wheatears was a real good fit for the leucorrhoa race from Greenland (& nearby Canada and Iceland).
GreaterShorttoedLark_LacRose_20180211_IMG_9270

Greater Short-toed Lark / Alouette calandrelle

  • As usual, a few Singing Bush Larks were about, though not very active and as always quite difficult to get good views of as they often remain close to cover, even sheltering under bushes.
SingingBushLark_LacRose_20180211_IMG_9215

Singing Bush Lark / Alouette chanteuse

  • Quite surprisingly, we saw lone Sand Martins (twice), a House Martin, and especially Red-rumped Swallow – the latter a long-awaited addition to my Senegal list. Already on the move, or are these hirundines overwintering in the area?
  • A final stop on the edge of the plain, where the steppe transitions into the dunes on one side and a seasonal pond (now dry) on the other. Here we found a couple of species that I’d seen in the same spot before, particularly two that have a pretty localised distribution in western Senegal it seems: Yellow-fronted Canary, and Splendid Sunbird. Also seen here were another Red-necked Falcon, Mottled Spinetail, Vieillot’s Barbet, etc.
SplendidSunbird_LacRose_20180211_IMG_9317

Splendid Sunbird / Souimanga eclatant

  • And plenty of gulls by the lake! First time I see this many gulls here, with at least 800 birds, mainly Audouin’s (ca. 350) and some 500 Lesser Black-backed Gulls. Lots of ringed birds of course, but most were too far and we didn’t take the time to go through the entire flock.

 

And elsewhere in Dakar…

  • A “Pallid HeronArdea (cinerea) monicae was found by Gottlieb and Cyril at Parc de Hann on 13/2 (but not relocated yesterday…). A rare Dakar record!
  • Seawatch sessions at Ngor continue to deliver good species, most notably good views of several European Storm-Petrels these past couple of weeks. Lots have been seen along the Petite Cote (Saly, Somone, Toubab Dialaw) recently, and especially at the Gambia river mouth where several dozen birds were counted.

 

 

Advertisements

Business as usual (enfin, presque) au Technopole… 21/1

Visite de routine du dimanche matin au Technopole, avant-hier avec Miguel.

Tout comme ces dernières semaines, il y a plein de monde sur notre hotspot urbain favori: très nombreux limicoles profitant des conditions de nourrissage idéales en ce moment, plusieurs centaines de canards dans la partie la plus profonde du plan d’eau central, un groupe de flamants, spatules, des pélicans des deux espèces, des centaines de laridés, etc. etc.

Janvier, c’est le mois du comptage international des oiseaux d’eau Wetlands, donc on s’est dits que ce serait intéressant de faire un décompte aussi complet que possible. Pas facile! Il y a des groupes d’oiseaux dans tous les sens, pour certains en partie cachés par la végétation et les îlots, et de surcroît tout ce monde bouge en continu, dérangés à tour de rôle par des rapaces (notamment un Busard des roseaux et un Faucon crécerelle), chiens et pêcheurs. On prend chacun quelques espèces ou on se partage la zone en secteurs afin de faciliter le dénombrement, qui nous occupera bien pendant plus de trois heures.

On commence par les plus faciles: cinquante-cinq Pélicans gris, trente-deux blancs  (Great White & Pink-backed Pelican), dix-neuf Spatules blanches (Eurasian Spoonbill), cinq Bihoreaux (Black-crowned Night-Heron), puis juste à côté au pied des palétuviers une Foulque (! Eurasian Coot), douze Flamants,… Les limis ensuite, avec l’Echasse blanche (Black-winged Stilt) en tête: 1’420 individus! J’avais estimé leur nombre à la louche, lors de mes précédentes visites, à 700-900 Echasses, mais n’avais jamais pris le temps de faire une comptage proprement dit. Effectif impressionnant!! Sur la photo ci-dessous il y en a à peu près 200…

BlackwingedStilt_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8830

Black-winged Stilt / Echasse blanche

 

Toujours beaucoup de Pluviers argentés (min. 49) et d’Avocettes (107); au moins 18 Gavelots pâtres, 6-7 Petits Gravelots et 665 (!) Grands Gravelots. (Grey Plover, Avocet, Kittlitz’s, Little Ringed & Common Ringed Plover)

CommonRingedPlover_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8860

Common Ringed Plover / Grand Gravelot

 

Environ 300 Barges à queue noire (Black-tailed Godwit), apparemment en légère augmentation par rapport au début du mois, avec plusieurs individus qui commencent à arborer leur livrée nuptiale. Pas moins de 830 Combattants variés (Ruff)… puis là tout d’un coup, devant nous, deux délicats limicoles surgissent de nulle part: des Bécasseaux roussets! (Buff-breasted Sandpiper!)

BuffbreastedSandpiper_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8791

Buff-breasted Sandpiper / Bécasseau rousset

Ils se laisseront bien observer même si leur comportement nerveux fait qu’ils sont difficiles à suivre et à photographier, courant rapidement sur la vase sans jamais s’arrêter. Ils se nourrissaient essentiellement sur la vase sèche en bordure des ilots enherbés, un peu derrière la cabane des pêcheurs. Nos deux yankees disparaissent aussi subitement qu’ils ne sont apparus, pour revenir d’un coup au même endroit un peu plus tard. Je suis d’ailleurs persuadé que lors de ma précédente visite j’ai vu passer un de ces oiseaux en vol: ne l’ayant vu que brièvement et l’oiseau ayant disparu loin au fond, je n’ai pas osé l’annoncer comme tel… donc j’étais bien content de pouvoir confirmer!

C’est la septième ou huitième donnée pour le pays, selon si on considère l’oiseau vu en janvier dernier au Lac Rose comme nouvel arrivant ou bien comme l’un des trois individus trouvés en décembre 2017. Petit résumé des précédentes observations ici.

BuffbreastedSandpiper_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8760

Buff-breasted Sandpiper / Bécasseau rousset

BuffbreastedSandpiper_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8812

Buff-breasted Sandpiper / Bécasseau rousset

 

On continue le comptage avec les bécasseaux: 75 Cocorlis, au moins 242 Minutes (sans doute bien plus!), et un minimum de huit Variables, une douzaine de Sanderlings, et enfin six Maubèches. Chez les chevaliers, le Sylvain est le plus nombreux (+40), suivi par les Aboyeurs, Stagnatiles, Gambettes, Guignettes et l’habituel Culblanc (ce dernier dans le même coin qu’une Rhynchée peinte, déjà vue la semaine précédente). (Curlew Sandpiper, Little Stint, Dunlin, Sanderling, Knot, Wood Sandpiper, Greenshank, Marsh Sandpiper, Redshank, Common Sandpiper, Green Sandpiper, Greater Painted-Snipe)

Wood-MarshSandpiper_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8822

Wood & Marsh Sandpiper / Chevalier sylvain & stagnatile

 

Maintenant au tour des mouettes, goélands et sternes – douze espèces en tout, essentiellement des Goélands railleurs (450) et bruns (près de 200; Slender-billed & Lesser Black-backed Gull). Avec comme souvent quelques trucs plus rares dans le tas: un Goéland leucophée (Yellow-legged Gull) adulte, quatre ou cinq Mouettes mélanocéphales (Mediterranean Gull), tous de premier hiver, dont un oiseau porte une bague verte avec inscription blanche! On arrive tout juste à la déchiffrer, RV2L. Cet oiseau bagué en tant que poussin en juillet 2017 sur l’ile de Noirmoutier (Vendée, France) fournirait du coup la première reprise de bague pour l’espèce au Sénégal. Un autre oiseau français avait déjà été contrôlé en Gambie en mars 2015, mais pour le reste il n’y a apparemment pas de reprises de Mouettes mélanocéphales en Afrique de l’Ouest. On est ici vraiment en limite de l’aire d’hivernage régulier donc très peu d’oiseaux sont vus au Sénégal, pour la plupart des individus dans leur premier hiver en région dakaroise. Cette espèce coloniale très étudiée en Europe – un peu comme les Goélands d’Audouin du bassin méditerranéen – cela devait arriver tôt ou tard qu’un oiseau bagué pointe le bout du bec chez nous.

On arrivera également à déchiffrer les bagues de deux Goélands railleurs, un Goéland d’Audouin, une Sterne hansel (U83, déjà vu l’hiver dernier) – tous espagnols – et une Barge à queue noire hollandaise. (colour-ringed Slender-billed & Audouin’s Gulls, Gull-billed Tern, Black-tailed Godwit)

Ensuite les canards, d’habitude faciles à compter au Technopole car ils sont rarement présents en nombre. Cette saison c’est différent: depuis octobre, on voit plus de Sarcelles d’été (Garganey) que ces dernières années, et depuis le début du mois il y a une quantité inhabituelle de Canards souchets (Northern Shoveler). En effet, on arrive à environ 420 souchets et 110 sarcelles – là aussi, de beaux effectifs pour le site! A mettre en relation avec le manque d’eau sur d’autres zones? J’allais presque oublier les Grèbes castagneux (Little Grebe), pour lesquels on fait encore péter le score: pas moins (et en fait plutôt plus) de 527 individus.

Apres tout cela, on en a enfin terminé avec les oiseaux d’eau, pour un bilan de plus de 6’000 individus de 61 espèces différentes. Qui dit mieux?

En plus des passereaux hivernants classiques – Bergeronnettes printanières, Pouillots véloces, Fauvettes passerinettes, Phragmites des joncs – il y avait ce matin aussi un Traquet motteux. (Yellow Wagtail, Common Chiffchaff, Western Subalpine Warbler, Sedge Warbler, Northern Wheatear)

YellowWagtail_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8782

Yellow Wagtail / Bergeronnette printanière

 

Sinon bonne présence de l’Hirondelles de Guinée, avec une troupe considérable (+38!) qui évoluent au-dessus de la zone, et dont plusieurs individus semblent collecter de la boue pour le nid. Aussi quatre Toureterelles masquées, quelques Martinet des palmes et une petite troupe d’Erémomèles a dos vert, trois espèces assez rarement vues au Technopole. (Red-chested Swallow, Namaqua Dove, Palm Swift, Senegal Eremomela)

Terminons enfin avec une espèce très commune et généralement ignorée par les ornithos (moi en premier), alors qu’elle fait partie d’une des famille d’oiseaux les plus remarquables de la planète: les corvidés. Extrêmement intelligents, ces oiseaux sont connus pour leur esprit curieux, joueur et inventif – au point où il y a des espèces, comme le Corbeau calédonien qui détiendrait la palme des oiseaux les plus smart, fournissant l’un des très rares exemples d’animaux sachant fabriquer et utiliser des outils (avec des modeles variables d’une région à une autre! Et qui disait que “Culture” était un trait purement humain?). A ce sujet, je vous recommande vivement l’excellent The Genius of Birds par Jennifer Ackerman. Mais je divague… là, on observe le manège de deux Corbeaux pies posés non loin et qui semblent s’intéresser de près à un bout de plastique (?). Simple curiosité, envie de jouer, ou intérêt purement culinaire?

PiedCrow_Technopole_20180121_IMG_8771.JPG

Pied Crow / Corbeau pie

 

 

L’année ornithologique sénégalaise 2017 / Year in review

Comme cela semble une tradition chez les bloggeurs, je me suis pris au jeu de faire une petite revue de l’année 2017, ornithologiquement parlant bien sûr. On parlera évidemment des vraies raretés, mais aussi de l’exploration de quelques coins peu connus, des données de nidification et d’extension d’aire, et j’en passe. Pas facile en tout cas de résumer les points forts de ces douze derniers mois, non seulement parce qu’il y en a pas mal, mais aussi du fait que pour beaucoup d’espèces le statut réel au Sénégal reste encore à préciser: répartition, phénologie, statut et tendances. Difficile aussi de couvrir un pays entier quand on n’est que 3-4 ornithologues réellement actifs à y résider!! Il manque certainement des obs importantes dans ma synthèse – qui sera forcément incomplète – donc si vous avez des compléments ou des corrections je les ajoute volontiers.

D’abord les grosses raretés:

Ensuite, quelques autres migrateurs rares – Rare migrants:

  • Le Puffin majeur est vu à Ngor le 25/5 (2 inds.), une rare donnée “printanière”, alors qu’un passage important – et étonnant par la date – a lieu début décembre. Great Shearwater: two at Ngor on 25/5 were apparently the first May record, while a strong passage was noted early December. 
  • Un Grand Cormoran de la ssp. maroccanus était lui aussi à Ngor, sur les enrochements, les 2 et 15/12. Great Cormorant at Ngor in December. 
  • Plusieurs Bondrées apivores sont notées entre le 9/10 et le 5/11, avec un autre même à fin décembre, alors que c’est une espèce apparemment rarement vue, en tout cas dans l’ouest du pays: Dakar, Toubacouta, Guéréo/Somone et Popenguine. Several Honey Buzzards in October and early November between Dakar and the Saloum, with another bird at Somone in late December. 
  • Deux Aigles de Bonelli sont vus dans la région des Trois-Marigots en novembre-décembre, où un imm. était déjà présent en fevrier, confirmant ainsi la présence régulière en très petit nombre dans le nord-ouest du pays. Ornithondar continue avec les rapaces, sous la forme d’un Vautour percnoptère noté le 25/12, espèce qui a aussi vu des effectifs importants dans le Boundou en fin d’année. Two Bonelli’s Eagles and an Egyptian Vulture near Saint-Louis.
  • Deux petits rallidés peu vus au Senegal ensuite: la Marouette poussin surtout, trouvée à Boundou les 4-5/11, mais aussi celle de Baillon au Djoudj (7/2) à la STEP de Saint-Louis (25/12), qui pourraient bien concerner un hivernant ou un oiseau de passage et non un local. Two little marsh skulkers that are rarely reported from Senegal, though they are probably quite frequent on migration, are Little Crake at Boundou, and Baillon’s Crake near Saint-Louis.
  • Plusieurs espèces peu fréquentes dans la région de Dakar sont vues pour la première fois au Technopole: Goéland dominicain, Flamant nain, Phalarope à bec large, Bengali zebré, Souimanga pygmée, Rolle violet, Hibou des marais, Pouillot ibérique. Egalement un Bec-en-ciseaux le 4/6 et une Sarcelle d’hiver le 9/11, avec d’autres migrateurs peu fréquents comme le Goéland leucophée et la Bécassine sourde à l’appui. A number of scarce species in the Dakar region were reported for the first time from Technopole: Kelp Gull, Lesser Flamingo, Grey Phalarope, Zebra Waxbill, Pygmy Sunbird, Broad-billed Roller, Short-eared Owl, Iberian Chiffchaff. Also African Skimmer and a Eurasian Teal, while other uncommon migrants seen at the site include Jack Snipe, Yellow-legged Gull.
  • Le 29/10, un Blongios de Sturm est à la lagune de Yène, endroit par ailleurs très fréquenté cet automne par les canards et limicoles. A Dwarf Bittern, along with good numbers of ducks and waders, was seen at Yene lagoon.
  • Un Martinet à ventre blanc est vu le 13/10 à Boundou, et le 13/11 il y en avait deux à Popenguine, où jusqu’à neuf Hirondelles de rochers étaient présentes en novembre-décembre. Alpine Swift at Boundou and at Popenguine, where up to nine Crag Martins were seen in Nov.-Dec.
  • L’Hypolais pâle, un hivernant probablement régulier mais rarement détecté au Sénégal, était à Palmarin le 19/2, alors que deux oiseaux sont identifiés le 28/12 près de Guéréo (dans la même zone qu’en mars 2016 – une coïncidence?). Eastern Olivaceous Warbler – probably regular, but very rarely detected. One was at Palmarin on 19/2, while two birds were at Guereo (Somone) on 28/12 (where one was seen in the same area in March 2016 – a coincidence?)
  • Une Pie-grièche isabelle est signalée près de Gossas (vers Ouadiour) le 28/11. Isabelline Shrike near Gossas on 28/11. 
  • Un hybride Pie-grièche à tête rousse x écorcheur le 26/8 au Lac Tanma était une première non seulement pour le pays mais apparemment aussi pour le continent africain. Hybrid Woodchat x Red-backed Shrike at Lac Tanma, apparently a first such record for Africa.
BaillonsCrake_STEP-StLouis_20171225_IMG_7089

Baillon’s Crake / Marouette de Baillon

Woodchat x Red-backed Shrike / Pie-grieche a tete rousse x ecorcheur

Woodchat x Red-backed Shrike / Pie-grieche à tête rousse x ecorcheur

Quelques autres observations intéressantes: effectifs records, nouvelles donnes sur la répartition – Other sightings: record numbers and new range data

  • Parmi les autres “premières” pour la réserve naturelle communautaire du Boundou se trouvent bon nombre de migrateurs paléarctiques comme la Spatule blanche (Eur. Spoonbill) ou le Becasseau cocorli (Curlew Sandpiper) et même un Fuligule nyroca (4-5/11; Ferruginous Duck), mais aussi quelques africains, migrateurs (Blongios de Sturm, Least Bittern), erratiques (Courvite à ailes bronzées, Bronze-winged Courser) et résidents (Gladiateur de Blanchot, Grey-headed Bush-shrikeBruant à ventre jaune, Brown-rumped Bunting).
  • Le Puffin du Cap-Vert est présent en fin d’hiver au large de Dakar, comme d’habitude, mais un effectif important est noté le 18/4 lorsque pas moins de 5’500 oiseaux se nourrissent devant Ngor. Cape Verde Shearwater: a max. of ca. 5,500 birds were feeding off Ngor on 18/4.
  • L’observation d’un Phaéton à bec rouge adulte sur l’Ile aux Oiseaux de la Langue de Barbarie les 7-12/4 était pour le moins insolite. Red-billed Tropicbird on the Langue de Barbarie’s “Bird Island” on 7-12/4.
  • Un Ibis hagedash survole la maison aux Almadies, Dakar, le 23/8, alors que l’espèce semble toujours présente sur la Petite Côte avec plusieurs observations en octobre. Hadada Ibis: one on 23/8 flying over Almadies, Dakar, and several observations at Somone and Saly. 
  • Le Marabout d’Afrique est vu aux Trois-Marigots (14/4), soit dans une région du pays où l’espèce est maintenant très rare semble-t-il. Marabou Stork at Trois-Marigots. 
  • Un Aigle huppard adulte a survolé le Lac Tanma tout en criant, le 1/10, donc hors de son aire regulière dans le pays. A Long-crested Eagle flew over Lac Tanma while calling, away from its regular range in Senegal
  • L’effectif d’environ 300 Foulques macroules le 16/5 à Ross-Bethio (près du Djoudj) est surprenant à cette période de l’année. A Dakar, il y en a eu deux au Lac Mbeubeusse le 7/10 et autant à Yène-Todé les 21-29/10. Around 300 Eurasian Coots were at Ross-Bethio on 16/5, a high count especially at this time of the year; in the Dakar region, two records of two birds. 
  • Un Trogon narina est de nouveau observé dans la réserve naturelle de Dindéfello (16/2), soit le seul site d’où l’espèce est actuellement connue, suite à sa découverte en 2010. J’allais aussi ajouter deux Bulbuls à queue rousse signalés dans la forêt de galerie au même endroit (3/2) et publiés dans le Bulletin de l’ABC, mais à en lire le rapport de voyage des observateurs on constate que l’identification est loin d’être certaine. Narina’s Trogon was seen again at Dindéfello, the only site in Senegal where the species, which was first recorded here in 2010, occurs. Two Leafloves were reported from the gallery forest here, but it seems that identification is far from certain despite being published in the ABC Bulletin.
  • Le Moineau domestique est maintenant bien implanté à Tambacounda semble-t-il, et l’espèce est vue pour la première fois au Boundou: l’expansion continue! House Sparrow now well established in Tambacounda and reported for the first time at Boundou. 
  • A Lompoul, le Petit Moineau est vu début janvier puis de nouveau confirmé à la fin de l’année, avec plusieurs oiseaux dont des chanteurs, bouchant ainsi un trou dans l’aire de répartition connue. Bush Petronia was found early January and confirmed again at the end of the year, thus filling a gap in the known distribution range.
CapeVerdeShearwater_Ngor_20170415_IMG_1247

Cape Verde Shearwater / Puffin du Cap-Vert

Quelques donnees de nidification intéressantes – Interesting breeding records:

  • Le Canard à bosse a de nouveau niché au Lac Tanma (f. avec 12 canetons le 1/10); le Dendrocygne veuf a niché au même endroit et à la lagune de Yène. Knob-billed Duck noted breeding again at Lac Tanma, where also White-faced Whistling Duck, which also bred at Yene. 
  • Pas encore de nidification, mais des observations intriguantes de plusieurs Fous bruns dont des couples visiblement formés et montrant un comportement territorial, aux Iles de la Madeleine en avril-mai surtout – à suivre! Au même endroit, 5-6 couples de Sternes bridées étaient présents en juinBrown Boobies showing signs of breeding behaviour (but no confirmed breeding) at Iles de la Madeleine, where 5-6 pairs of Bridled Tern were present in June.
  • La nidification de la Gallinule poule-d’eau est confirmée au Technopole, tout comme celle – déjà constatée dans le passé – de la Talève d’Afrique. Moorhen confirmed breeding at Technopole, where African Swamphen was also seen breeding once again. 
  • Les Echasses blanches ont eu une très bonne année au Technopole, alors que la nidification a été attestée de nouveau dans le Djoudj. Black-winged Stilts had a bumper year at Technopole, while breeding was noted in the Djoudj. 
  • Toujours pas de preuve de nidification (faute d’avoir investi le temps qu’il faudrait!), mais les Tourterelles turques du parc de Hann sont toujours présentes – avis aux amateurs! Still no proof of breeding, but the small population of Eurasian Collared Doves in Dakar is still around. 
  • Un jeune Coucou jacobin vu en octobre près de la Somone constitue une rare donnée de nidification certaine (voire la première?) pour le pays. Un autre juvenile est vu à Patako début novembre Jacobin Cuckoo fledgling near Somone. 
BridledTern_IlesdelaMadeleine_20170624_IMG_2788

Bridled Tern / Sterne bridee

JacobinCuckoo_Somone_20171009_IMG_5155

Jacobin Cuckoo / Coucou jacobin

Et enfin, parlons un peu des coins peu connus ou peu explorés – Little explored areas:

  • L’un de ces sites est la forêt de Pout près de Thiès, que nous avons visitée en juin (Circaète brun, Pintade de Numidie, Oedicnème tachard, etc.), et plus encore la forêt de Patako près de Toubacouta, explorée par Miguel en novembre.
  • En Casamance, nous avons pu faire des observations à Kolda en mai, avec observations entre autres du Grébifoulque et du Rale perlé, deux especes rarement notées en Casamance même si elles doivent y être régulières. Egalement en Casamance, on a pu voir des Faucons crécerellettes et un Busard pâle en migration active près de Cap-Skirring, alors qu’à Diembering on a pu confirmer p.ex. la présence de l’Apalis à gorge jaune (+ Phyllanthe capucin et quelques autres spécialités forestières à l’écoparc). Gabriel de son côté a pu visiter la région de Vélingara, avec notamment l’observation d’un Bihoreau à dos blanc. African Finfoot & White-spotted Flufftail at Kolda in Casamance. There appear to be very few, if any, recent records from Casamance even though the species is likely to be widespread. Also in Casamance: Cap Skirring – Lesser Kestrel and Pallid Harrier; ecoparc near Diembering: Yellow-throated Apalis, Capuchin Babbler, etc. Also a White-backed Night-Heron near Velingara. 
  • Quelques visites dans la steppe, les dunes et les niayes près du Lac Rose, trop peu visitées par les ornithos, ont produit des observations d’hivernants peu courants à cette latitude, comme l’Alouette calandrelle, le Traquet isabelle, ou encore le Traquet oreillard A few visits to the steppe, dunes and niayes near Lac Rose, rarely visited by birders, yielded several interesting records of winter visitors that are reputed to be mostly restricted to northern Senegal: Greater Short-toed Lark, Isabelline Wheatear, Black-eared Wheatear.
  • Enfin, en 2017 nous avons pu mener ce qui doit être le premier suivi systématique sur l’ensemble de la saison de migration d’automne des oiseaux de mer, devant Dakar. Les faits marquants comprennent notamment un effectif record de Mouettes de Sabine, un passage impressionnant de Puffins cendrés et de Scopoli, un Puffin de Boyd et un Puffin des Baléares, et bien plus encore – résumé complet iciLast but not least, in 2017 we conducted what was the first extensive seabird migration monitoring effort in Senegal (and more generally in West Africa it seems), with regular observations made from the mainland at Ngor between the end of July and the end of December. Highlights included a record number of Sabine’s Gulls, strong passage of Cory’s and Scopoli’s Shearwater, a Boyd’s Shearwater, a Balearic Shearwater, and much more. 
African Finfoot / Grebifoulque

African Finfoot / Grebifoulque

Que nous apportera 2018? Dans tous les cas, avec un nouvel ajout à la liste nationale des le 1er janvier, l’année a bien commencé!

 

 

 

And we’re off to a good start… with a new species for Senegal

New Year, New Birds! Apparently I found another new species to Senegal – needless to say that this resulted in a rather successful day out birding. Which left me wondering, rather pointlessly, how many country firsts have been found on the first day of the year.

Lac Rose

So I first went to Lac Rose, and more specifically the steppe to the NE of the lake as this area had produced a lot of good birds last winter, including three or even four Buff-breasted Sandpipers. I was keen to go back and see if any of the “specials” were around again this winter. One of the first birds I found in the short grass was Greater Short-toed Lark, so things were off to a good start.

GreaterShorttoedLark_LacRose_20180101_IMG_7763

Greater Short-toed Lark / Alouette calandrelle

As I started walking on the far end of the steppe, I found a very pale wheatear: a textbook Isabelline Wheatear, just like last year in January.

IsabellineWheatear_LacRose_20180101_IMG_7798

Isabelline Wheatear / Traquet isabelle

The same area held three Tawny Pipits and a few other birds, though not the hoped-for Temminck’s Coursers.

TawnyPipit_LacRose_20180101_IMG_7802

Tawny Pipit / Pipit rousseline

Towards the end of my visit I came across this Southern Grey Shrike – cool bird, but a bit too flighty to allow for decent pictures.

SoutherGreyShrike_LacRose_20180101_IMG_7819

Southern Grey Shrike / Pie-grièche meridionale

Also around were several Kittlitz’s Plovers (+ Common Ringed and Kentish on the lake shores), at least four Quailfinches thus confirming the species’ presence in the Niayes IBA, a Black-headed Heron, Vieillot’s Barbet dueting in the distance, and so on.

Yene

Next up: the Yène-Tode lagoon. While on my previous visit, barely two weeks earlier (17/12), there was still a good amount of water, by now the lake has all but dried up: just a little trickle here and a small pool there, with just a handful of Black-winged Stilts, Spur-winged Lapwings, a lone Knot, Common Sandpiper and a few other waders. With all the waterbirds gone, I didn’t think I’d see much on this visit, but was soon proved to be very wrong!

Shortly after getting out the car, I located a small flock of Yellow Wagtails feeding on a green patch in what used to be the lagoon just a few weeks earlier. A pipit amidst the wagtails was either going to be a Tree or (more likely) a Red-throated Pipit, so I got the bird in the scope… and was a bit puzzled at first that it didn’t fit either species?! As I approached, it flew off and called a few times, confirming my suspicion: a Meadow Pipit!! It landed a hundred meters or so further in more dense vegetation. I knew this was a good species for the country and wanted to get better views and maybe even a few pictures (I didn’t quite realise it had never been confirmed in Senegal before!), so I went after it, flushed it and again heard the diagnostic hurried hiist-ist-ist-ist flight call. It returned to the original spot, and this time round I got really good views plus a few record shots:

MeadowPipit_Yene_20180101_IMG_7900

Meadow Pipit / Pipit farlouse

MeadowPipit_Yene_20180101_IMG_7884

Meadow Pipit / Pipit farlouse

Note the dense streaking on a pale buffy background with streaks clotting together on middle of breast, general lack of warm tones (as would be the case for Tree Pipit), fine bill with diffuse yellowish base, absence of clear pale lines on the mantle (as in Red-throated), the “gentle” expression with fairly pale lores, an indistinct supercilium and narrow-ish submoustachial (what a word!) stripe. The rump was clearly unstreaked (thus ruling out Red-throated Pipit) and while I didn’t manage any good pictures of the hind toe, it did appear quite long and pictures show it to be only moderately curved (ruling out Tree Pipit). These pipits are no easy birds to identify on plumage, but luckily the call is so typical and unlike any other pipit that it allowed for a safe ID while I was watching the bird, and I was lucky to get a few decent shots. A few people have asked me to provide more pictures, so here they are – all are originals without any editing except for cropping.

This bird was obviously in a fresh plumage, and can be aged as a first-winter bird based on the shape and colour of the median coverts: the ‘tooth’ on the dark centre with a clear white tip (Svensson 1992) is quite visible in the pictures.

MeadowPipit_Yene_20180101_IMG_7891

Meadow Pipit / Pipit farlouse

Meadow Pipit is of course a common species throughout much of Europe, be it as a breeding bird or on passage or as a winter visitor. Its non-breeding range covers western Europe and most of the Mediterranean Basin, extending along the Atlantic coast down to the Canary Islands and Morocco. In Mauritania it is considered to be scarce but regular, reaching as far as the Senegal river delta, more or less as shown on the map below (borrowed from xeno-canto). Surely it must occur at least irregularly in northern Senegal, given its status in nearby Mauritania?

MeadowPipiMap_XC.PNG

 

While relocating the Meadow Pipit, I also flushed no less than eight Red-throated Pipits as well as three Common Quails. Two Collared Pratincoles were hanging out by the last puddles; the Marsh Harriers and most of the Ospreys are now gone, but there were still at least two Short-toed Eagles in the area, with another two along the track back to Rufisque. Two Mosque Swallow were also around, while two Zebra Waxbills were rather unexpected, given that they’re not supposed to occur in the Dakar region (see last year’s post on the sighting of a group at Technopole). Tawny Pipit was another addition to the site’s ever-growing list.

CommonPratincole_Yene_20180101_IMG_7838

Collared Pratincole / Glaréole à collier

 

Technopole

Following a very successful morning yesterday at Technopole (Short-eared Owl! Iberian Chiffchaff! Jack Snipe!) I stopped by to have a closer look at the numerous waders, given that yesterday I’d forgotten my telescope at home… Nothing out of the ordinary to report today, just tons of waders, gulls (incl. two Mediterranean Gulls) and lots of Caspian Terns (+150, and now also 27 Greater Flamingos (nine were present yesterday). And I relocated the Iberian Chiffchaff quite easily as it’s singing regularly, and tends to keep to a single bush – more on this in another post.

 

Oh and happy new year!

 

bram

 

A bit of news from our little neighbour

It’s about time we reported some news from Gambia on this blog.

Clive Barlow’s recent appointment as official bird recorder for The Gambia is a great excuse to do so. Given its peculiar enclaved geography – just like my home country, a bit of an accident of history, Gambia has always had close ties to Big Brother Senegal, in many ways – cultural, religious, linguistic, ethnic, economic… In the same way, Senegal’s and Gambia’s wildlife and ecosystems are of course intricately connected. A key difference, however, is that despite it being just about 6% of the size of its neighbour, The Gambia has a much higher density of resident birders, birding tours, and local guides, and as such is far better covered, ornithologically speaking, than Senegal.

Want some examples to illustrate the connections between the two? Here’s a first one: the wanderings of Abuko, one of several Gambian “Hoodies” that are equipped with satellite tracking devices. As a youngster, this particular Hooded Vulture was a keen traveler, having covered a good deal of central Senegal, Western Casamance (where it seemingly has taken up residence), and upriver Gambia. The map below shows its movements for the past 4 years.

Abuko movements 2017-12-03

 

Another example are the Slender-billed Gulls, Caspian Terns, and Royal Terns that breed in Senegal’s Saloum delta, many of which make it to The Gambia at some point. Take for instance Slender-billed Gull “POL” ringed as a chick in June 2014 at the Ile aux Oiseaux, and seen at Tanji Bird Reserve on 16/3/15, 14/4/15 and again the following winter, on 5/2/16. Among the 40+ other recoveries of the Saloum’s breeders in TG, another one is AUF: ringed on 15/6/15 at Jakonsa (also in the PNDS), it was seen on 26/8/15 at Tanji, and then almost a year later, on 26/6/16, at our very own Technopole.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Slender-billed Gull / Goéland railleur “POL” (John Hamilton & CrB)

 

And now for the very official announcement of Clive’s appointment, by the West African Bird Study Association from Gambia (WABSA):

“As from 15 Oct 2017 WABSA is pleased to appoint Clive R Barlow as the voluntary Country Recorder for bird observations in The Gambia. WABSA intends an annual Gambia bird report & general update of activities for presentation to DPWM & this publication will then will be accessible to all resident ornithologists & visiting birders. The work will also compliment the GIS bio diversity project currently under planning at DPWM. More news of e.g. single species enquiries, colour ring reports, nest/breeding records, will be notified as the project develops. In the meantime various report forms are being developed but feel welcome to email your ad hoc records, trip reports etc past, present & future to CliveRB [email]. Additionally, all related field research activities will involve WABSA and DPWM staff also to partake voluntarily in the absence or presence of funding. ”

So, if you visit TG: please send your records, whether of common birds or rarities, to Clive.

Clive also runs a project on the phenology of Paleartic passerine migrants to The Gambia, running from as far back as 1965 to present, systematically recording the first arrival  and last departure dates in the coastal area (Banjul – Tujering). In 2017, we have for instance the last record of Western Olivaceous Warbler in 29/03, with the first return bird as early as 28/07, while Subalpine Warbler was last seen on 26/04 and had a first returning bird on 06/10; Common Swift 14/04 & 30/07, etc. The first Common Nightingale of the autumn was heard singing on 13/11.

Watch this space for more trans-border collaborations and publications! (next up: Great Shearwater in Senegambia, status of Kelp Gull, and more!).

I certainly hope to make it to TG some time soon, to see what’s all the fuss about and visit some of the hotspots such as Tanji, Kartong, Abuko Forest, Kiang West and so on.

And meet CrB in real life 😉

 

For now, I’m off to the Djoudj, Langue de Barbarie, Lompoul and Somone. Happy holidays!

 

(Featured image: “Beach Boys” by CrB, 2017)

 

 

 

Yène 17/12: a rare duck, more waders & migrants

And Yène delivers again!

I went back to our little hotspot on Sunday morning to see what new there was to be found – and whether I could relocate three vagrant ducks that Miguel and colleagues spotted here the previous weekend (my first proper Sengalese twitch!). The lagoon is quite literally shrinking by the day at the moment, so not very much water is left by now – meaning that all waders and other remaining water birds were fairly concentrated in a small-ish area, not all of which is visible from the main viewpoints.

There were tons of waders so it took some time to go through them and count or estimate each species, resulting in the following totals:

  • A few hundred Black-winged Stilts (2-300?), still five Avocets
  • More than 320 Common Ringed Plovers, again at least two Little Ringed Plovers, but also a couple of Kentish and at least 39 Kittlitz’s Plovers; also several Grey Plovers
  • At least 70 Marsh Sandpipers was a pretty high count, even for Senegalese standards (I actually can’t remember ever seeing so many – at one point, about 50 birds were feeding in a single group). Unusually, Marsh Sandpiper was actually the most abundant Tringa wader. Technopole also has more than usual at the moment. There were about 30 Wood Sandpipers, and a handful each of Greenshanks, Redshanks, and Green Sandpipers.
  • About 60 Ruff scattered throughout
  • 200 Sanderling, 120 Little Stints, ca. 30 Dunlin, one Curlew Sandpiper
  • One Turnstone and Bar-tailed Godwit each
  • Three Common Snipes

The Pintails, Garganeys, Shovelers and even the White-faced Whistling Ducks seem to have left as the lagoon is probably too shallow now. Instead there are now three Common Shelducks! I didn’t see them at first, but after about half an hour of sifting through the waders, they were suddenly there, actively feeding on the opposite end of the lagoon and seemingly feeling quite at home here! Maybe they’ll end up staying for a few more days or weeks, until the lagoon dries up.

Shelduck_Yene_20171217_IMG_6631

Common Shelduck / Tadorne de Belon 1st c.y.

 

Not a species I thought I would ever see here: despite its name, it’s definitely not common in Senegal! With only six published records it should be considered a real vagrant to the country. The regular winter range of Tadorna tadorna extends along the Moroccan coast, with very small numbers reaching as far south as Mauritania, though apparently the species remains pretty rare even in the Banc d’Arguin NP. Olivier Girard very conveniently summarised the status of the species in West Africa, in a short paper published in the African Bird Club Bulletin in 2009¹. In his overview, he lists 28 records, almost half of which are from Mauritania, and just five from Senegal. One was apparently overlooked despite being published in the well-known “Annotated check-list of birds occurring at the PNOD, 1984-1994” by Rodwell and colleagues, while the location of another record is incorrect.

As far as we know, no other records have been published nor have any been reported to the ABC, on eBird, or on observado.org since Girard’s summary. As such, these should be all previous Shelduck records for Senegal:

  • Seven, Delta du Senegal, 27/12/73 (Morel & Morel)
  • Two immatures at Djoudj NP, 21/1/74 (Morel & Morel)
  • Two on 12-28/2/90 in the Djoudj NP (M. Fouquet in Rodwell et al. 1996)
  • 15 in the Djoudj NP, Januart 1996 (Yesou et al. 1996)
  • One in Djoudj NP, Jan. 1997 (Triplet et al. 1997)
  • Two on 5/1/97 at Yène-Todé lagoon (= in Dakar region and not “Siné-Saloum” as incorrectly stated by Girard.

And so now, more than 20 years later, we have three first-year birds from 9 to 17/12/17 at Yène-Todé, again!

It’s intriguing that there are so many more old records, given that observer coverage surely must have improved in the last 20-30 years – and that mid-winter waterbird counts are systematically conducted in the Djoudj and most other large wetlands (I really ought to get access to the database with past counts, as there don’t seem to be any published reports available?). What’s more, Shelducks have been on the increase in many parts of their Western European range, so one would logically expect more birds to show up in this part of the world. Maybe milder winters push fewer birds to the southern end of their range, or the populations that have increased are more sedentary than others? In better-watched Mauritania, at least during the first decade of the 21st century, there are just six records listed since 2000, one of which was near the border with Senegal in the Aftout es Saheli in January 2007, while elsewhere in the delta, Shelducks were seen in December 1995 and three times between Nov. ’98 and Jan. ’99: not much!! Three records each are known from Mali, Ghana and Niger, with one from Guinea (January 2006).

Addendum 2/2/18: eight birds were seen at the Grand Lac in the Djoudj NP on 17/1 (C. Ruchet, Y. Menétrey, I. Ndiaye), quite possibly the same group that was sighted on 30/12/17 in the Diawling on the other side of the border. 

Shelduck_Yene_20171217_IMG_6636

Common Shelduck / Tadorne de Belon

 

So what else was about? Glossy Ibis is still present (at least 3 ind.), and now no less than 28 European Spoonbills, most of which arrived from the NW and landed in the central part of the lagoon. As usual there were several Osprey and Marsh Harriers, plus an immature Short-toed Eagle hunting around the lake’s edge, a pair of Red-necked Falcons roosting on a tree, and a Common Kestrel (and on 9/12, Miguel & co. had a fine Barbary Falcon).

The flock of gulls and terns held the usual Caspian, Royal, Sandwich and Common Terns, but just a few Audouin’s Gulls, LBBGs, Slender-billed, Grey-headed and Black-headed Gulls this time round.

Just like on my last visit, Red-throated Pipit was present on the lagoon’s edge: I first heard its sharp pssiiiii call in the SE corner, then briefly saw (and heard) what was probably a second bird, a few hundred meters further. Two Tree Pipits were also present.

Other migrant songbirds included Yellow Wagtails of course, plus Northern Wheatear, Subalpine Warbler, Common Whitethroat, Sedge Warbler, and Woodchat Shrike.

All in all, another very enjoyable morning out at Yène!

Technopole update

A Technopole pit-stop on the way back to Dakar resulted in yet more waders, with still some 300 Black-tailed Godwits around (just one ring could be read, as most birds were feeding or resting in deeper water) and lots of other waders. On my previous visit, we managed to read six rings, mostly in this flock of BTGs feeding on land:

BlacktailedGodwit_Technopole_20171203_IMG_6580

The water levels are already quite low and I’d reckon that they are about the same as in April 2017: let’s hope that the site doesn’t completely dry up by the end of the dry season!!

More of a surprise was an adult African Spoonbill (also two Europeans) resting on one of the islets, its deep crimson face just about visible. Surprising, because it’s not a frequent visitor to Technopole, and so far my only records have been in April and May.

A Common Moorhen with a very young chick, confirming local breeding of the species. Other than that, lots of Lesser Black-backed Gulls (+300), a few Audouin’s Gulls, a White-winged Tern feeding among the Black Terns, at least two Knot, lots of Ruff, etc. An adult male Peregrine Falcon may be the same bird that I see almost daily on the Diarama hotel.

Peregrine_Technopole_20171217_IMG_6652

Peregrine / Faucon pèlerin

 

¹ Girard, O. 2009. Le Tadorne de Belon Tadorna tadorna en Afrique de l’Ouest. Bull ABC 16: 180-183.

 

 

La migration en mer devant Dakar: l’automne 2017 (2ème partie)

Comme promis, ci-dessous la suite de notre petite synthèse du suivi de la migration à Ngor. Au cas où vous l’auriez loupée, la première partie se trouve ici.

PomarineSkua_Pelagic_20171115_IMG_6003

Pomarine Skua moulting / Labbe pomarin en mue (2nd c.y.?), Nov. 2017

Je reprends ici le tableau des espèces, même si cette deuxième partie traite uniquement des limicoles, labbes, laridés, sternes et de quelques autres migrateurs (cliquez/tapez pour agrandir).

Seawatch_2017_Summary

Limicoles (Waders)

  • Huîtrier pie (Eurasian Oystercatcher): vu lors d’une séance sur quatre, c’est avec l’espèce suivante le limicole le plus régulier. Généralement des oiseaux isolés ou par 2-3 ensemble, rarement plus (max. de 7 le 12/10).
  • Courlis corlieu (Whimbrel): de loin le limicole le plus nombreux, avec plus de 500 oiseaux dénombrés. Le passage s’effectue – sans surprise – tôt en saison, les premiers oiseaux étant observés le 28/7 (certainement que d’autres les avaient déjà précédés courant juillet, le Corlieu étant l’un des migrateurs paléarctiques les plus précoces). Le matin du 9/8, ce ne sont pas moins de 293 Courlis corlieux qui passent devant le Calao, en 3h30 de suivi… impressionnant! Les effectifs deviennent plus modestes dès le début du mois de septembre, avec un dernier migrateur supposé le 27/10.
  • Barge rousse (Bar-tailed Godwit): ce limicole venu du Grand Nord est bien moins fréquent que l’espèce précédente, qu’il accompagne d’ailleurs volontiers. Plus de la moitié des 67 barges sont vues le 24/8, après quoi le passage est occasionnel avec des petits effectifs à chaque fois.
  • Phalarope à bec large (Grey Phalarope): le seul limicole “pélagique”, cette espèce ne s’observe pas très souvent depuis le Calao; seuls une centaine d’oiseaux sont vus dont 70 qui passent en trois groupes le 28/10, suivis par 24 le 6/11. Quelques observations lointaines de limicoles indéterminés qui pourraient bien se rapporter à cette espèce.
  • D’autres limicoles vus en migration active sont le Courlis cendré (deux le 5/9), le Grand Gravelot, les Chevaliers gambette, aboyeur, guignette et même culblanc, le Combattant varié; aussi Bécasseaux sanderling, cocorli, variable, minute, et le Tournepierre. La plupart de ces limis sont vus lors des matinées pluvieuses, ou après des averses nocturnes, comme ce fut le cas le 24/8 lorsque pas moins de neuf espèces sont vues en migration active.
Oystercatcher_Ngor_20170930_IMG_4931

Oystercatcher / Huîtrier en escale devant le Calao

Labbes (Skuas/Jaegers)

Avec un total de 5’882 labbes dénombrés, il s’agit là du 3e groupe le plus nombreux à passer devant Ngor, après les puffins (36’335 ind.) et le sternes (22’307 ind.).

  • Labbe de McCormick / Grand Labbe (South Polar / Great Skua): la présence des deux espèces a été confirmée dans les eaux dakaroises, mais leur identification reste toujours délicate voire impossible sur le terrain, du moins en l’absence de bonnes photos. Ceci vaut encore plus pour les oiseaux vus en migration active, typiquement vus de loin et pendant quelques secondes ou 1-2 minutes tout au plus, leur séparation est généralement impossible. J’ai donc noté seulement quelques individus typiques comme étant des McCormick sûrs, soit les oiseaux de forme claire ou intermédiaire vus suffisamment bien. Le premier “grand labbe” est vu le 23/8 déjà – date hâtive pour un Grand, donc plutôt McCormick? – puis des isolés passent les 18 et 20/9. Le 8/10 je note un McCormick, le lendemain deux “sp.”, trois le 14/10, puis ce n’est que du 18/10 au 31/10 que ces oiseaux sont vus quasi quotidiennement, avec un max. horaire de 8 le soir du 24/10 – un peu moins donc que l’an dernier à la même période. Encore deux observations fin novembre et une le 3/12, portant le total à 75 oiseaux pour la saison.
  • Labbe pomarin (Pomarine Skua): avec un minimum de 3’368 oiseaux comptes, c’est l’une des espèces les plus nombreuses à passer devant Ngor. Le passage est régulier dès le 31/8, culminant dans la dernière semaine d’octobre et la première décade de novembre. Le maximum est noté le 7/11: pas moins de 957 individus en deux heures de suivi a peine! La fin du passage n’est pas incluse dans ce suivi 2017, car des oiseaux continuent de migrer encore, en nombres variables selon les jours, jusqu’à la 2e décade de décembre en tout cas (p.ex. 47 inds. en 75 min. le 15/12), avec certainement encore quelques oiseaux encore tout à la fin du mois. A noter qu’une bonne partie des 1’731 labbes non identifiés étaient sans doute des Pomarins – probablement au moins les deux tiers, car en plus d’être de loin le labbe le plus fréquent, la plupart des labbes non identifiés sont ceux qui passent loin au large, et on a l’impression – partagée par les équipes des années 2000 – que le Pomarin passe généralement plus au large que le Parasite, qui lui migre volontiers plus près des côtes. Sur l’ensemble de la saison, le rapport Pomarin/Parasite s’établit à environ 6:1.
  • Labbe parasite (Arctic Skua): espèce très régulière bien qu’en petits effectifs, de la dernière décade d’août jusqu’à la fin de la saison. Comme indiqué sur le graphique ci-dessous, il n’y a pas eu de pic bien net, contrairement au labbe précédent qui passe en force pendant une période bien concentrée. On constate également des différences dans le comportement de ces deux labbes: lors des jours de forte migration, les Pomarins passent souvent en groupes lâches comprenant jusqu’à plusieurs dizaines d’individus (max. env. 70 ensemble!), alors que le Parasite migre typiquement seul ou en paires, rarement plus de 3-4 oiseaux ensemble. Autre différence, le Pomarin migre régulièrement assez haut dans le ciel.
  • Labbe à longue queue (Long-tailed Skua): sur les 125 individus dénombrés, 123 sont passés vers le SW – effectif probablement légèrement sous-estimé, car quelques labbes indéterminés sont notés comme “Longue queue ou Parasite”. Ce labbe peut être vu de la mi-août jusqu’à mi-novembre, bien que les deux derniers individus (16 et 21/11) n’étaient pas en migration active: sans doute des oiseaux en escale. Les adultes passent surtout en août et septembre, alors qu’en octobre on voit essentiellement des immatures. Malheureusement je n’ai pas eu le luxe de noter les classes d’âge pour les labbes – là j’aurais besoin de renforts! – donc difficile d’en dire plus sur la répartition précise des immatures et des adultes au fil de la saison chez les trois “petites” espèces.

Skuas_2017_chart

Mouettes & Goélands (Gulls)

  • Mouette de Sabine (Sabine’s Gull): cette belle mouette est sans aucun doute l’une des espèces phares du site, et cette saison on n’a pas été déçus: après un avant-coureur vu le 9/8 déjà, le passage s’amorce timidement dès la fin août, pour devenir régulier à partir du 18/9 au moins. Un premier petit pic est noté le 21/9 (66 inds. en 1h15), puis le 10/10 (84 en 1h30), le 16/10 (182 en 2h)… effectifs qui nous semblaient déjà tout à fait corrects. C’était sans compter (pour ainsi dire!) sur la suite de la saison: Après cinq jours avec à peine quelques individus (sans doute lié aux vents dominants du N/NNE), j’en vois 484 en 2h30 de suivi le 24/10, puis le matin du 25/10, Miguel et moi en comptent pas moins de 1’415 (!) en 3h30, avec encore 77 individus supplémentaires comptés le soir en 1h20. Cela porte donc le total à 1’492 Mouettes de Sabine: à notre connaissance il s’agit là d’un nouveau record journalier pour le Sénégal et sans doute pour l’ensemble de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. En extrapolant, on peut estimer l’effectif total à quelques 4’850 oiseaux pour cette seule journée du 25/10! Quel spectacle que de voir des groupes de 20, 30 Mouettes de Sabines défiler à la queue-leu-leu… Il y a encore eu quelques bons jours début novembre, puis la migration s’arrête assez brusquement après le 13/11, lorsque les vents tournent vers le N/NE. Deux retardataires le 21/11 et un seul le 1/12 portent finalement le total de la saison à 3’326 oiseaux. Plus encore que pour les autres espèces pélagiques, le passage de cet oiseau devant les côtes est fortement influencé par la direction des vents: quasiment toutes les observations sont faites par vent modéré d’ouest à nord-ouest. Les autres jours, elle doit passer bien plus au large. Là non plus, il n’a pas été possible de tenir des statistiques sur les âges, mais c’est sûr qu’il y avait en tout cas cette année une forte proportion d’adultes; les juvéniles sont plutôt vus en fin de saison.

SabinesGull_2017_chart

  • Pour ce qui est des autres laridés, il y a surtout le Goéland d’Audouin: (voir cet article pour en savoir plus sur son statut au Sénégal) et le Goéland brun (Audouin’s & Lesser Black-backed Gulls). Une centaine pour le premier (env. 85 vers le SW) et 24 oiseaux (dont 14 vers le SW) pour le deuxième, auxquels il faut ajouter 16 “grands goélands indéterminés”, soit des Leucophées, bruns ou dominicains. Un très probable Goéland dominicain (Kelp Gull) passe le 11/8. Le Goéland railleur est vu à cinq reprises seulement, entre le 9/8 et le 8/11, la Mouette à tête grise seulement deux fois (isolés les 18 et 24/9) (Slender-billed & Grey-headed Gulls).

 

Sternes (Terns)

  • Sterne arctique / pierregarin (Arctic / Common Tern): cette paire regroupe 50% (49,8% pour être précis!) de toutes les sternes notées en migration, mais vu la difficulté de distinguer entre les deux taxons lorsque les groupes défilent rapidement devant le site de suivi, j’avais fait le choix de toujours les grouper – ce qui une fois de plus montre les limites de faire un tel suivi tout seul! De plus, j’ai dû estimer le passage certains jours de fort passage, et lorsque les oiseaux passaient très proches du rivage voire haut dans le ciel (surtout le cas avec l’Arctique) j’ai dû en louper pas mal. Du coup, difficile d’interpréter la phénologie telle que suggérée par la courbe ci-dessous. On y note toutefois un net pic à fin septembre, avec une moyenne horaire de près de 300 individus. Le pic de la Sterne arctique se situe apparemment plus tôt en saison (fin août/début septembre); celui de la Pierregarin environ un mois plus tard.

Common-ArcticTern_2017_chart

  • Sterne de Dougall (Roseate Tern): le total de 98 individus est à considérer comme un stricte minimum, car plusieurs individus sont sans doute passés inaperçus dans le flot de Pierregarins et Arctiques sans se faire détecter. Quoiqu’il en soit, la phénologie est assez nette, le passage étant régulier du 24/8 au 20/10, avec un dernier individu le 24/10. Le pic doit se situer à la mi-septembre, mais en l’absence de suivi du 7 au 17/9, difficile d’en dire plus. Un groupe inhabituellement grand (19 inds.) passe encore le 13/10.
  • Sterne naine (Little Tern): avec 186 individus, cette espèce peut être considérée comme migratrice régulière, en faibles effectifs, de fin juillet à fin octobre ou début novembre (un dernier oiseau est vu le 29/11, mais celui-ci n’était pas en migration active).
  • Sterne caugek (Sandwich Tern): près de 4’000 individus dénombrés, surtout de la mi-août à la mi-octobre, bien que le passage s’étale sur toute la saison: déjà fin juillet, des petits groupes sont notés, mais à partir de novembre il devient de plus en plus difficile de faire la part entre migrateurs actifs et oiseaux partant vers les reposoirs ou les sites de nourrissage situés plus au SW du Calao.

SandwichTern_2017_chart

  • Sterne voyageuse (Lesser Crested Tern): les premiers oiseaux sont vus dans la première décade d’août qui marque le début du passage régulier, qui s’étale jusqu’à la mi-novembre. Comme pour l’espèce précédente, il est parfois difficile de distinguer entre oiseaux en migration active et hivernants locaux. En effet, entre deux et cinq oiseaux fréquentent régulièrement la baie de Ngor dès le mois de septembre. Le très modeste pic du passage semble se situer dans la dernière décade de septembre.
  • Sterne royale “africaine” (African Royal Tern): très régulière mais rarement vue en nombres importants, cette sterne est vue tout au long de la saison, mais dès début octobre le passage ralentit fortement pour ne concerner plus que quelques individus (là aussi, il a souvent été difficile de faire le tri entre locaux et migrateurs). Au nord de Dakar, cette espèce ne se reproduit que dans deux grandes colonies, soit celles de la Langue de Barbarie et du Banc d’Arguin.
  • Sterne caspienne (Caspian Tern): vue irrégulièrement: seulement douze données sur l’ensemble de la saison, pour un total de 31 oiseaux présumés migrateurs actifs (max. 12 le 18/9; les trois derniers individus n’étaient probablement pas des migrateurs). L’origine de ces oiseaux peut être européenne ou africaine.
  • Guifette noire (Black Tern): l’une des espèces les plus régulières, avec un “taux de présence” de 87%: elle a donc manqué à l’appel seulement lors de quelques sessions. Effectif maximal de 740 individus le 22/9, lorsque plusieurs milliers ont dû passer devant Dakar. A noter que j’ai entendu des migrateurs nocturnes à plusieurs reprises migrer au-dessus de la maison aux Almadies lors du pic de fin septembre. Une Guifette moustac (Whiskered Tern) est vue le 14/10, mais d’autres sont certainement passées inaperçues, tout comme quelques Guifettes leucoptères ont pu passer au milieu des noires.

BlackTern_2017_chart

Autres taxons

J’en ai déjà mentionné plusieurs ici, donc juste pour résumer voici les autres espèces vues en migration active devant Ngor:

Trois Hérons cendrés et deux pourprés passent le 24/9, alors que des Grandes Aigrettes (1 le 12/10, 5 le 31/10) étaient probablement des migratrices en escale (une Aigrette intermédiaire était également présente le 31/10). Un Balbuzard est noté en migration active le 5/10, tout comme un Busard des roseaux le 12/10, un Faucon crécerellette le 15, et des crécerelles le 27/10 (2 ind.) et le 20/11 (1 ind.). Une Tourterelle des bois passe devant le Calao le 5/9, puis il y a eu ce fameux Hibou des marais le 2/12. Peut-être l’espèce la plus insolite a été la Huppe fasciée, avec deux observations d’individus ayant le même comportement les 18 et 24/9: à chaque fois, je repère l’oiseau arrivant du N ou du NNE volant au-dessus de l’océan et se dirigeant vers Ngor. Seuls quelques Martinets noirs sont vus en tout début de saison (les 5 et 12/8), avec un probable Martinet pâle, vu la date, le 22/10. Quelques Bergeronnettes printanières sont vues ou entendues entre le 14 et le 28/10, alors qu’une Bergeronnette grise survole le site le 30/11. Et enfin deux passereaux en escale sur les rochers ou la petite plage du Calao: quatre Traquets motteux (16/10-29/11) et deux Rougequeues à front blanc (14 & 24/10).

 

Je doute fort que j’aurai le temps de refaire un tel suivi l’automne prochain… bien qu’avec un peu de renforts lors des périodes “stratégiques” il doit être possible de faire encore mieux que cette année. Pour l’instant, on va essayer de renforcer le suivi au printemps (fin février / fin mai) mais là non plus ce ne sera pas possible tout seul… avis aux amateurs!